Close Guantánamo Bay torture camp now


Mass demonstration of hunger strikers outside the US embassy in London, England demanding that the Guantanamo Bay prison is shut down

From daily News Line in Britain:

Shut G-Bay Down! 17 Years Of ‘Temple Of Torture’

8th May 2019

SEVENTEEN years since it opened, Guantánamo Bay remains as significant and problematic as ever, says Reprieve.

Here are five of the most compelling reasons why Guantánamo Bay should be closed for good, says Reprieve.

1. The ‘worst of the worst’ myth

More detainees have died in Guantánamo than have been convicted of a crime.

The US’s claim that Guantánamo detainees are the ‘worst of the worst’ does not stand up – US authorities started to release those who had been abducted and imprisoned as early as 2002, the year the prison opened.

Now, only 40 remain from a total of 780.

In fact, within a year of opening, Guantánamo’s operational commander complained that he was being sent too many ‘Mickey Mouse’ detainees.

As the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights points out: ‘According to official information, only 8% of Guantánamo detainees were characterised as ‘fighters’ for Al-Qaeda or the Taliban; 93% were not captured by US forces; and most were turned over to US custody at a time in which the United States offered bounties for the capture of suspected terrorists.”

The majority of the detainees were never even charged with a crime, let alone convicted of one.

In total, the US has only convicted six of the 780 prisoners who have been through Guantánamo’s gates.

2. Trump’s temple of torture

Leaked documents from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in 2004 detail ‘an intentional system of cruel, unusual and degrading treatment and a form of torture at Guantánamo.’

The ICRC documented the use of humiliating acts including solitary confinement, temperature extremes, use of forced positions, exposure to loud and persistent noise and music, and regular beatings.

The UN’s Special Rapporteur for Torture has made it clear that indefinite detention in itself amounts to torture.

The main conclusion of the US Senate’s 2014 probe into CIA torture was that it ‘was not an effective means of acquiring intelligence.’

But Donald Trump has said he would like to ‘bring back waterboarding’ and ‘a hell of a lot worse’, adding: ‘Don’t tell me it doesn’t work – torture works … if it doesn’t work, they deserve it anyway.’

3. The expensive mistake

It costs the US tax payer $445 million a year to keep the remaining 40 detainees held in Guantánamo. This means that it costs $29,000 per prisoner per night to keep Guantánamo open – far more than any federal or state prison.

4. The legal black hole

In opening Guantánamo Bay in 2002, the US Government sought to create a legal black hole – where it argued neither US nor international law applied.

Choosing an offshore facility in Cuba as the base, the administration claimed that detainees were not covered by the US Constitution because they were not on US soil, and that their enemy combatant status meant they could be denied legal protections.

The ‘legal protections’ in question ranged from being denied access to lawyers and fair trials to the systematic use of torture.

5. The prison of no exits

Last year, Donald Trump proudly announced that nobody else would be released from Guantánamo.

There are 40 men still in the prison – five of those have already been cleared for release in a rigorous process involving six separate US agencies including the Department of Defence and the Director of National Intelligence.

They have been deemed to pose no threat, yet Donald Trump won’t allow them to leave.

Reprieve says: ‘We led the fight for access to the men held at Guantánamo, and were one of the very first organisations allowed inside.

‘Since then, we have secured freedom for more than 80 men illegally detained without charge or trial – more than any other organisation.

‘After 9/11, the US government systematically designed and implemented a programme of abducting and torturing terrorism suspects, before imprisoning them without due process in Guantánamo Bay.’

Reprieve’s Clive Stafford Smith, who was one of the three lawyers who demanded and successfully sued for access to the prison, said: ‘Since 2002, 779, including at least 15 children, have been imprisoned at Guantánamo.

‘The vast majority of them were sold to the US for large bounties – typically, around $5,000 for each man.

‘So far, just four detainees have been convicted of a crime – fewer than the number who have died in detention.

‘No-one has ever been held accountable for the illegal detention and abuse at the prison camp and it remains open to this day.’

Meanwhile, Maya Foa, Director of Reprieve, has condemned Tory Home Secretary Sajid Javid for undermining UK opposition to the death penalty.

Commenting on a leaked letter from Javid to US Attorney General Jeff Sessions last year, Foa said: ‘Sajid Javid has undermined the UK’s decades-long opposition to the death penalty and Guantánamo Bay in an attempt to outsource our justice system to the US.

‘There is no reason why people accused of murdering British citizens should not face British justice in a British court.

‘Justice is not served by turning such individuals over to a US justice system which has an appalling record of trying such cases, in large part as a result of torture and mistreatment.

‘Guantánamo Bay has, over a period of 16 years, seen repeated attempts to hold any judicial process fail.

‘Only four out of 780 detainees have been convicted in the military courts system.

‘The death penalty, as the government has accepted many times, is not effective as a deterrent and has led to gross miscarriages of justice.

‘Instead of kowtowing to the Trump Administration, Sajid Javid should use the laws already in place to bring these cases before a British court.’

On Monday, the US Supreme Court refused to hear a challenge to the government’s indefinite detention of an inmate at the infamous Guantanamo Bay prison camp. Moath al-Alwi has been imprisoned and tortured for nearly two decades without ever having been convicted of any crime. The court’s action is for all practical purposes a repudiation of basic democratic rights and a tacit endorsement of the regime of abductions, renditions, torture, secrecy and indefinite detention without trial that has been erected in the course of the “war on terror”: here.

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Pentagon sacks Guantanamo commander for mentioning torture


This February 2017 British TV video is called Torture: The Guantanamo Guidebook.

By Bill Van Auken in the USA:

Pentagon fires Guantanamo prison commander for calling attention to US crimes

30 April 2019

The Pentagon has announced the abrupt firing of the commander of the infamous US prison camp at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba.

In a statement released Sunday, the US Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), which oversees the extra-legal detention center, claimed that Rear Adm. John C. Ring, the camp commandant, had been relieved of his command because of a “loss of confidence in his ability” to lead. The facility has a staff of 1,800 troops and civilian personnel deployed to continue the imprisonment of 40 remaining detainees.

The dismissal comes just weeks before Ring was to complete his tour as the 18th commander of the prison camp, which was opened in 2002 as part of the “war on terror” launched under the administration of George W. Bush. The timing suggests retaliation by the top brass over what it sees as the rear admiral’s overly frank statements to the media.

Last December, he gave an interview at one of Guantanamo’s detention centers to NBC News in which he complained about the deterioration of the camp facilities and the failure of Congress to appropriate funds for their replacement or repair. He also warned that the aging of the prisoners could soon turn the notorious site of torture, rendition and illegal detention into something resembling a nursing home.

Ring had estimated last year that $69 million was needed to replace the most dilapidated of the camp’s facilities, which houses the 15 so-called “high-value detainees” who were transferred to Guantanamo in 2006–2007 after being imprisoned and tortured at CIA “black sites” around the world.

His firing came on the same day that the New York Times published a lengthy article titled “Guantánamo Bay as Nursing Home: Military Envisions Hospice Care as Terrorism Suspects Age . ” Written by Carol Rosenberg, who has reported from Guantanamo since 2002, previously for the Miami Herald, the article included extensive statements made by Ring during a recent press trip to the prison camp.

“Unless America’s policy changes, at some point we’ll be doing some sort of end of life care here,” the Times quoted the commander as saying. “A lot of my guys are pre-diabetic… Am I going to need dialysis down here? I don’t know. Someone’s got to tell me that. Are we going to do complex cancer care down here? I don’t know. Someone’s got to tell me that.”

The oldest prisoner at Guantanamo is now 71, while the average age is 46. Many have been held since the facility opened in 2002, and the majority of them, 26 in all, have never been charged, much less tried for any crime.

Defense One quoted Ring as stating: “I’m sort of caught between a rock and a hard place. The Geneva Conventions’ Article III, that says that I have to give the detainees equivalent medical care that I would give to a trooper. But if a trooper got sick, I’d send him home to the United States. And so I’m stuck. Whatever I’m going to do, I have to do here.”

Any US military personnel with serious health problems are airlifted to the US Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. Laws passed by Congress, however, bar any Guantanamo detainees from being brought onto US soil for any purpose whatsoever. As a result, detainees who suffer serious medical conditions, in many cases the result of systematic torture, receive either inadequate care or none whatsoever.

The Times article cited the case of Abd al Hadi al Iraqi, accused of leading resistance to US troops who invaded Afghanistan. He was left untreated for degenerative disc disease and back injuries exacerbated by torture until he lost the use of his legs and became incontinent. What followed was a series of botched spinal surgeries performed in the prison camp that has left Hadi, 58, in a wheelchair and dependent upon painkillers. While medical personnel concluded that he needed complex surgery that could not be performed at the camp, the law bars his being transferred to a US military hospital.

The Times article also cited the case of Mustafa al Hawsawi, a Saudi man alleged to have provided assistance with travel and expenses to the 9/11 hijackers. He “has for years suffered such chronic rectal pain from being sodomized in the CIA prisons that he sits gingerly on a pillow in court, returns to his cell to recline at the first opportunity and fasts frequently to try to limit bowel movements.”

Another prisoner, an Indonesian man known as Hambali, who is accused of being a leader of the Southeast Asian Islamist group Jemaah Islamiyah, requires a knee replacement as a result of injuries suffered during torture at CIA black sites, including being continuously shackled by his ankles.

Massive anti-Trump demonstrations in Britain


This 13 July 2018 video from England is called Anti Trump March London July 13 2018.

This video says about itself:

Anti-Trump protests take over London

Thousands of women marched in a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump’s visit to the U.K. on July 13. The march paraded down Regent Street, through Piccadilly, onto Trafalgar Square finishing up at Parliament Square.

This Canadian TV video says about itself:

Anti-Trump protests put Theresa May in awkward spot

12 July 2018

Anti-Trump protests greeted the U.S. president in London, putting Prime Minister Theresa May in a tough spot. Much of Britain has
voiced their opposition to Trump’s visit.

This video from London, England says about itself:

Trump UK visit met with mass protests

13 July 2018

RT’s Anastasia Churkina reports from Westminster where the Donald J. Trump baby balloon has been flown ahead of mass protests expected in London today.

By Chris Marsden in Britain:

Mass protests against Trump’s UK visit

14 July 2018

The huge protests in London and elsewhere in the UK yesterday were an outpouring of anger and revulsion against US President Donald Trump.

Organisers estimated a quarter of a million flooded into Trafalgar Square and surrounding streets. Police admit over 100,000. Tens of thousands also protested in major cities such as Manchester, Sheffield and Glasgow.

This was the first opportunity for workers in Europe to express their own views on the US president, after a week he spent threatening the European powers with trade war and demanding they speed up their own ongoing rearmament.

And whereas Europe’s rulers bemoaned their wounded pride at Trump’s pointed insults while seeking to maintain working relations, the UK protests prove that millions upon millions of workers despise Trump and everything he stands for—the enrichment of the billionaires, gutting of welfare provision, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim racism and naked warmongering.

There is no doubt that Trump’s trip to Europe played its part in galvanising yesterday’s protests, including his xenophobic outburst in the Sun against immigrants and immigration destroying British and European culture.

Prime Minister Theresa May invited Trump to visit, despite more than a million people signing a petition in opposition. She hoped to secure his support for a US trade deal post-Brexit, promising the president at Blenheim Palace “an opportunity to tear down the bureaucratic barriers that frustrate business leaders on both sides of the Atlantic.”

Instead, in the pages of the Sun Trump treated her with naked scorn for daring to seek a continued relationship with the European Union, publicly savaging her just as he had German Chancellor Angela Merkel. All while his fascist attack dog, Steve Bannon, organised meetings with far-right figures at his Mayfair hotel …

But the nationwide protests gave only a very partial expression to the opposition that exists to Trump. He complained that he had been made to feel “unwelcome” in London. But had anyone called for strikes and boycotts of his visit, then Trump would have been sent packing.

No one made such a call—neither the trade unions, nor Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Corbyn spoke at Trafalgar Square, gave press interviews and made a video castigating Trump for his abuses of immigrants and attacks on human rights. But he made sure to declare, “We are committed to dialogue, including of course with those we strongly disagree with and in government we would find a way to work with his administration while also standing up for our values.”

What does such a statement signify? That in office Labour would seek to work with Trump because he represents US imperialism. …

The character of the political establishment’s nominal opposition to Trump was spelt out in the Guardian’s editorial. Supporting the protests, it contrasted Trump’s trip with the very first visit by a US president to Europe, Woodrow Wilson, in the aftermath of World War I, “to make peace in war-ravaged Europe and to lead the construction of a liberal international order based on laws and rights.” But it did so without offering any explanation for Trump’s rise to the presidency and to insist that the European powers continue to represent a shining beacon for these same values.

“Mr Trump’s America can no longer be regarded with certainty as a reliable ally for European nations committed to the defence of liberal democracy”, it declared, while columnist Jonathan Freedland insisted that Britons “need to decide where we stand on what is emerging as the defining global divide.” With the EU or “with the world of Putin, Viktor Orbán and Trump… in which you either screw or get screwed…”

Dear Mr Freedland: Hungarian Viktor Orbán, the most racist head of government in Europe, stands ‘with the European Union’. His far-right party is a ‘respected’ member of the ‘Christian Democrat’ European People’s Party, the most influential political party in the European Union. During the Brexit referendum in Britain, Viktor Orbán paid for ‘open letter’ advertisements in the Daily Express and other British media, urging British voters to vote Yes to the European Union.

There is a political gulf between such apologists for the British and European imperialist powers and the great mass of working people and youth. They have been subject to savage austerity by Europe’s governments and have seen them eviscerate democratic freedoms and collectively preside over the treatment of refugees every bit as brutal as Trump, while boasting of their own rearmament programmes and turn to militarism.

The stench of fascism hovering over Trump and his Mafia-like shakedown of May and other European leaders is not an issue of an aberrant personality. Rather, his boorishness and brutality is the embodiment of all the violent characteristics of American imperialism in the period of its decline.

Whether led by Trump and the Republicans, or Hillary Clinton and the Democrats, the US will stop at nothing to preserve global political, economic and military domination. Indeed, Trump’s ascent to power confirm the prescience of Leon Trotsky’s insistence that “In the period of crisis the hegemony of the United States will operate more completely, more openly, and more ruthlessly than in the period of boom.”

One hundred years ago, in 1918, President Woodrow Wilson came to Europe, holding aloft his “Fourteen Points” presenting himself and America as the savior of “democracy, universal brotherhood and peace.” There was no small element of deceit and hypocrisy in the pretensions of Wilson, but the ascent of American imperialism endowed the president’s proclamations with a certain credibility. Wilson, a former university president, was even able to articulate the ambitions of US imperialism with considerable eloquence.

But a century later, the grotesque figure of Trump lumbers across Europe, threatening one and all with “offers that can’t be refused”. The differences in appearance, culture, demeanor and language reflect different stages in the historical trajectory of American imperialism. Wilson represented the ascent of the United States. Trump personifies its descent and putrefaction.

The same processes—the deepening economic crisis of world capitalism, the ferocious struggle to control the world’s markets and resources—also drives the European powers to respond in kind to the US challenge. Above all Trump, May, Merkel, Macron and the rest share the same basic hostility to the working class, who must be made to pay for the trade and military war through the destruction of their jobs and living standards.

A genuine movement against the societal promotion of inequality, nationalism, xenophobia, militarism and war that has become associated with the name Donald J. Trump demands the unification of the British, European, American and international working class against the imperialist world order and all its governments. It means the building of a new leadership to take forward the fight for a socialist alternative based on equality, internationalism and peace.

Facing up to Trump and his policies. Matt Willgress reports on an upcoming major Labour left festival of ideas which will look at how we can better campaign for a better world for the many. Thousands of people will protest today and over this week against Theresa May rolling out the red carpet for Donald Trump. Even though over 1.8 million people signed a petition against Trump being given a state visit to Britain only last year, the increasingly isolated Prime Minister has put on a visit for Trump which is a state visit in all but name, with a meeting with the Queen included in the itinerary: here.

This video says about itself:

Massive Protests in the UK Against Donald Trump’s Visit

13 July 2018

Massive protests against US President Donald Trump visit to the UK have been organized in 25 cities across the country. Tens of thousands of people are taking part in the demonstrations. We were joined on the phone, live from the protest in London by Mohammed Ateek, from the Stop Trump Coalition.

Prime Minister May assures Trump over trade deal with US: here.

This 13 July 2018 video is called Meet the Activist Who Called Piers Morgan an “Idiot” for Criticizing Anti-Trump Protests in Britain.

This 13 July 2018 video from the USA says about itself:

Piers Morgan got owned on his own show. Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, Brooke Thomas, and Ben Mankiewicz, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down.

“President Donald Trump said Friday that immigrants fleeing violence and seeking asylum in Europe are changing “the fabric of Europe. … And I don’t mean that in a positive way.” Trump’s xenophobic comments came during a shocking interview with the Rupert Murdoch-owned British tabloid The Sun. Massive protests have greeted President Trump during his two-day trip to Britain—including a 20-foot-long giant baby Trump blimp outside Parliament. We go to the streets of London to speak with Ash Sarkar, the anti-Trump coalition organizer who confronted Piers Morgan during a “Good Morning Britain” interview Thursday that went viral.”

Read more here.

This 13 July 2018 video is called In U.K., Trump Insults Theresa May, Praises Far-Right Boris Johnson, Attacks London’s Muslim Mayor.

Trump has desperately turned on his allies to try to force them to accept the full impact of the developing crisis of capitalism, so as to avoid a socialist revolution at home. The ‘bully’ is terrified of the US working class! He has a truly desperate policy for the truly desperate state of world capitalism: here.

Demonstration outside the US Embassy in London demanding that Guantanamo Bay is shut down

ON WEDNESDAY, July 11, lawyers representing eight long-term detainees at Guantánamo Bay argued in federal court that the US government cannot continue to detain the prisoners there forever, immune to judicial review. The mass habeas corpus motion, filed on the men’s behalf by Reprieve, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and other counsel, argues that their indefinite detention, based on President Donald Trump’s proclamation that he will not release anyone from Guantánamo, is arbitrary and unlawful: here.

This 13 July 2018 video from the USA is called White House: We Can Keep You At Gitmo [Guantánamo Bay] “For 100 Years” With No Trial.

Guantanamo torture camp still open today


This video says about itself:

The Dark Legacy Of The Guantanamo Prison

11 January 2018

Guantánamo inmates claim Trump‘s ‘anti-Muslim bias‘ fuels their detention. Eleven prisoners are petitioning a federal court in Washington to end their indefinite incarceration and are citing the president’s campaign comments: here.

Will religion decide the fate of the Guantánamo Bay detainees? The Trump administration has moved from releasing detainees based on their risk factor to treating individuals as dangerous because of their faith: here.

Guantánamo: Bush-era officials warn keeping prison open may be $6bn error. Trump’s decision to keep the prison open may be costly and dangerous, according to officials who set up the Cuba facility: here.

The Man Who Almost Escaped Guantanamo Bay. After 14 years of imprisonment without charge, Abdul Latif Nasser thought he was finally going home. Then Donald Trump won: here.

CIA tried to use ex-Guantanamo prisoners as spies


Guantanamo Bay

Here, another old blog post by me which I thought was lost.

CIA tried to use ex-Guantanamo prisoners as spies

30 June 2005

Mood: Thinking Playing: War, by Edwin Starr

Dutch TV program NOVA of today is about an attempt by the United States CIA to use ex-prisoners of Guantanamo Bay camp as spies in The Netherlands and other countries.

They tried with five men of Moroccan ancestry. NOVA interviewed three of them.

Two of them declared that the CIA promised them the right to stay in The Netherlands.

Their lawyer, Mr Mohamed Hilal, said that for that they were supposed to spy within the Moroccan Dutch community.

Experts say the story of these three Moroccans is credible.

The five Moroccans were imprisoned in August 2001 in Afghanistan. Then, they went to Guantanamo Bay camp.

Last August, they were released without charges and sent to Morocco.

In NOVA, Mohamed Ouzar, Mohamed Mazouz, and Brahim Benchekroun said that the CIA in Guantanamo offered them to spy in five countries, including The Netherlands, Canada, and Switzerland.

There was heavy pressure on them not to return to Morocco. The CIA said they’d probably be tortured there.

In spite of the bad circumstances in Guantanamo, where prisoners were isolated in their cells and one said he had been ill most of the time, the prisoners refused the offers; as they said, they had committed no crimes and owed their captors nothing.

A Moroccan court released them after their return to Morocco.

NOVA showed the report on the three Moroccans to Martin Dillon. He wrote much on British intelligence in Northern Ireland.

Today, this intelligence expert studies mainly the CIA. Dillon says the ex-prisoners’ testimony fits into US tactics in Guantanamo Bay.

Also Dutch intelligence expert Wil van der Schans says the ex-prisoners’ story is credible. He suspects Dutch secret service AIVD were also implicated in this case.

Guantanamo Bay military judge arrests military defense lawyer: here.

Guantanamo Bay inmate refused access to book on non-violence written by bereaved 9/11 relatives. Exclusive: The book discusses the teachings of Martin Luther King: here.

The Pentagon faces renewed outrage this month over human rights abuses at Guantanamo Bay, after reports that the prison will prevent the release of, and possibly incinerate, detainees’ artwork. While previously the prison allowed rigorously pre-screened artwork to leave with released detainees and to be given to lawyers and aid workers, Department of Defense officials have ordered Guantanamo to stop releasing cellblock art altogether, declaring it “property of the U.S. government”: here.

Guantánamo inmates claim Trump’s ‘anti-Muslim bias’ fuels their detention. Eleven prisoners are petitioning a federal court in Washington to end their indefinite incarceration and are citing the president’s campaign comments: here.

Turkish Erdogan emulates Guantanamo, Saudi Arabia


This 2012 video about torture is called UK’s channel 4 “Guantanamo Handbook” documentary.

Three years ago, this blog mentioned that the ISIS terrorist organisation had copied its torture and its orange jumpsuits for prisoners from the United States Guantanamo Bay concentration camp which is illegally in Cuban territory.

It now turns out that ISIS are not the only ones to emulate Guantanamo. Turkish President Erdogan, voted ‘dictator of the year’ along with the ISIS boss in a poll, now wants Guantanamo jumpsuits for prisoners as well.

From RTE in Ireland, 15 July 2017:

Mr Erdogan also said the suspects being tried on suspicion of involvement in the failed coup should wear uniform clothing like the notorious orange jumpsuits used at US military prison at Guantanamo Bay.

“I spoke to the prime minister and… when they appear in court, let’s make them appear in uniform suits like in Guantanamo,” Mr Erdogan said.

United States President Trump, who has praised moves toward dictatorship in Turkey, and who likes Guantanamo and torture, won’t object to that.

Guantanamo is not the only inspiration for ISIS. The Saudi Arabian absolute monarchy is another one.

ISIS and Saudi Arabia punishment

This graph is from Middle East Eye. It shows where the cruel ‘state’ of ISIS, present in parts of Syria, Iraq, Libya and southern Yemen gets its ideas of fanatically religious criminal ‘justice’ from: from the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, staunch allies of the Pentagon and the CIA in the USA, of Theresa May in Britain, etc. etc.

Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world with the death penalty by beheading. ISIS might be called the second country; but ISIS territory is hardly a country. The French neo-fascist National Front party wants France to become the second country; but its candidate Marine Le Pen lost the presidential election.

Erdogan’s Turkey is in a proxy war with the Saudi regime in Libya, and on the brink of war with it about Qatar. Nevertheless, Erdogan wants to emulate not only Guantanamo, but also Saudi Arabia.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened to “chop off the heads” of traitors in a speech marking the first anniversary of the failed coup bid that aimed to oust him from power.

“First of all we will chop off the heads of those traitors,” Mr Erdogan told a rally in Istanbul, prompting cries from the crowds that capital punishment should be restored in Turkey.

Guantánamo, Cuban views, new film


This video says about itself:

ALL GUANTÁNAMO IS OURS

25 October 2016

Produced by RESUMEN LATINOAMERICANO, 2016

From the Investigaction site:

The word Guantánamo was popularized world-wide in 2002 when the U.S, Government opened a detention camp at the military base to detain more than 1,000 suspected terrorists there.

Few know that the territory is a piece of land that belongs to Cuba, but has been illegally occupied since 1903 and remains a present impediment to the normalization of relations between the two countries. Watch the new documentary All Guantánamo is Ours, directed by Colombian journalist and writer Hernando Calvo Ospina. This short film shows the feelings of the Cuban people, especially the people of Guantánamo, in relation to the occupied territory.