Guantanamo torture camp still open today

This video says about itself:

The Dark Legacy Of The Guantanamo Prison

11 January 2018

Guantánamo inmates claim Trump‘s ‘anti-Muslim bias‘ fuels their detention. Eleven prisoners are petitioning a federal court in Washington to end their indefinite incarceration and are citing the president’s campaign comments: here.

Will religion decide the fate of the Guantánamo Bay detainees? The Trump administration has moved from releasing detainees based on their risk factor to treating individuals as dangerous because of their faith: here.

Guantánamo: Bush-era officials warn keeping prison open may be $6bn error. Trump’s decision to keep the prison open may be costly and dangerous, according to officials who set up the Cuba facility: here.


CIA tried to use ex-Guantanamo prisoners as spies

Guantanamo Bay

Here, another old blog post by me which I thought was lost.

CIA tried to use ex-Guantanamo prisoners as spies

30 June 2005

Mood: Thinking Playing: War, by Edwin Starr

Dutch TV program NOVA of today is about an attempt by the United States CIA to use ex-prisoners of Guantanamo Bay camp as spies in The Netherlands and other countries.

They tried with five men of Moroccan ancestry. NOVA interviewed three of them.

Two of them declared that the CIA promised them the right to stay in The Netherlands.

Their lawyer, Mr Mohamed Hilal, said that for that they were supposed to spy within the Moroccan Dutch community.

Experts say the story of these three Moroccans is credible.

The five Moroccans were imprisoned in August 2001 in Afghanistan. Then, they went to Guantanamo Bay camp.

Last August, they were released without charges and sent to Morocco.

In NOVA, Mohamed Ouzar, Mohamed Mazouz, and Brahim Benchekroun said that the CIA in Guantanamo offered them to spy in five countries, including The Netherlands, Canada, and Switzerland.

There was heavy pressure on them not to return to Morocco. The CIA said they’d probably be tortured there.

In spite of the bad circumstances in Guantanamo, where prisoners were isolated in their cells and one said he had been ill most of the time, the prisoners refused the offers; as they said, they had committed no crimes and owed their captors nothing.

A Moroccan court released them after their return to Morocco.

NOVA showed the report on the three Moroccans to Martin Dillon. He wrote much on British intelligence in Northern Ireland.

Today, this intelligence expert studies mainly the CIA. Dillon says the ex-prisoners’ testimony fits into US tactics in Guantanamo Bay.

Also Dutch intelligence expert Wil van der Schans says the ex-prisoners’ story is credible. He suspects Dutch secret service AIVD were also implicated in this case.

Guantanamo Bay military judge arrests military defense lawyer: here.

Guantanamo Bay inmate refused access to book on non-violence written by bereaved 9/11 relatives. Exclusive: The book discusses the teachings of Martin Luther King: here.

The Pentagon faces renewed outrage this month over human rights abuses at Guantanamo Bay, after reports that the prison will prevent the release of, and possibly incinerate, detainees’ artwork. While previously the prison allowed rigorously pre-screened artwork to leave with released detainees and to be given to lawyers and aid workers, Department of Defense officials have ordered Guantanamo to stop releasing cellblock art altogether, declaring it “property of the U.S. government”: here.

Guantánamo inmates claim Trump’s ‘anti-Muslim bias’ fuels their detention. Eleven prisoners are petitioning a federal court in Washington to end their indefinite incarceration and are citing the president’s campaign comments: here.

Turkish Erdogan emulates Guantanamo, Saudi Arabia

This 2012 video about torture is called UK’s channel 4 “Guantanamo Handbook” documentary.

Three years ago, this blog mentioned that the ISIS terrorist organisation had copied its torture and its orange jumpsuits for prisoners from the United States Guantanamo Bay concentration camp which is illegally in Cuban territory.

It now turns out that ISIS are not the only ones to emulate Guantanamo. Turkish President Erdogan, voted ‘dictator of the year’ along with the ISIS boss in a poll, now wants Guantanamo jumpsuits for prisoners as well.

From RTE in Ireland, 15 July 2017:

Mr Erdogan also said the suspects being tried on suspicion of involvement in the failed coup should wear uniform clothing like the notorious orange jumpsuits used at US military prison at Guantanamo Bay.

“I spoke to the prime minister and… when they appear in court, let’s make them appear in uniform suits like in Guantanamo,” Mr Erdogan said.

United States President Trump, who has praised moves toward dictatorship in Turkey, and who likes Guantanamo and torture, won’t object to that.

Guantanamo is not the only inspiration for ISIS. The Saudi Arabian absolute monarchy is another one.

ISIS and Saudi Arabia punishment

This graph is from Middle East Eye. It shows where the cruel ‘state’ of ISIS, present in parts of Syria, Iraq, Libya and southern Yemen gets its ideas of fanatically religious criminal ‘justice’ from: from the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, staunch allies of the Pentagon and the CIA in the USA, of Theresa May in Britain, etc. etc.

Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world with the death penalty by beheading. ISIS might be called the second country; but ISIS territory is hardly a country. The French neo-fascist National Front party wants France to become the second country; but its candidate Marine Le Pen lost the presidential election.

Erdogan’s Turkey is in a proxy war with the Saudi regime in Libya, and on the brink of war with it about Qatar. Nevertheless, Erdogan wants to emulate not only Guantanamo, but also Saudi Arabia.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened to “chop off the heads” of traitors in a speech marking the first anniversary of the failed coup bid that aimed to oust him from power.

“First of all we will chop off the heads of those traitors,” Mr Erdogan told a rally in Istanbul, prompting cries from the crowds that capital punishment should be restored in Turkey.

Guantánamo, Cuban views, new film

This video says about itself:


25 October 2016


From the Investigaction site:

The word Guantánamo was popularized world-wide in 2002 when the U.S, Government opened a detention camp at the military base to detain more than 1,000 suspected terrorists there.

Few know that the territory is a piece of land that belongs to Cuba, but has been illegally occupied since 1903 and remains a present impediment to the normalization of relations between the two countries. Watch the new documentary All Guantánamo is Ours, directed by Colombian journalist and writer Hernando Calvo Ospina. This short film shows the feelings of the Cuban people, especially the people of Guantánamo, in relation to the occupied territory.

British art on the ‘war on terror’

This video from Britain says about itself:

3 March 2013

Step behind the scenes and get a glimpse of the thinking motivating the digital world’s greatest artists, filmmakers, thinkers and doers with the Lighthouse Monthly Talks. Award winning artist, Edmund Clark, was our November 2012 speaker.

As part of our Brighton Photo Biennial 2012, we were extremely pleased to have BPB12 artist and 2012 Prix Pictet nominee, Edmund Clark speaking at Lighthouse. Clark discussed his practice, which explored modes of control, living under conditions of surveillance, censorship and representation. His latest work experiments with how multidisciplinary collaboration and new technology can further address these themes. Clark’s exhibition, Control Order House is on at the University of Brighton Gallery.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

An atrocity exhibition

Saturday 20th August 2016

A new show at the Imperial War Museum is a grim reminder of the consequences for those perceived to be a terrorist threat by increasingly authoritarian states

LONDON’S Imperial War Museum has an outstanding track record in staging hard-hitting exhibitions, with Peter Kennard’s photo-montages and Edward Barber’s documentary photographs being two very recent examples.

Added to the roster is this disturbing new show of work by award-winning artist Edmund Clark. War of Terror, which runs until August next year, focuses on the measures states take to counter perceived terrorist threats and the malign impact they have on all our lives and explores the experience of people in Britain suspected — but never convicted — of terrorist-related offences in the interminable “war on terror.”

Clark says: “A vital challenge for today’s visual artists and photographers is how to explore new and unseen processes of contemporary conflict.

“My work engages with state censorship and control to find new visual strategies to try and achieve this and to reconfigure subjects we normally see as distant or threatening stereotypes on our screens.”

His personal contribution to the debate around those issues is a series of photographs, film and documents, some never previously exhibited.

They explore hidden experiences of state control and address the issues of security, secrecy, legality and ethics which they raise.

Clark’s most recent work Negative Publicity: Artefacts of Extraordinary Rendition, created in collaboration with counter-terrorism investigator Crofton Black, explores the experiences of those secretly detained and transferred without legal process to US custody for further detention and interrogation.

Guantanamo: If The Light Goes Out offers an uneasy contrast between living spaces at Guantanamo and the homes of former British detainees who were released without charge, while Letters to Omar features reproductions of censored correspondence sent to Omar Deghayes, a British detainee at Guantanamo, and later made available to Clark.

Cards and letters sent to him by people from around the world, most of them strangers, were scanned and redacted by military censors.

When and in what form Deghayes received the correspondence was part of the control exercised over him. Created by the bureaucratic processes of Guantanamo, these fragmentary reproductions added to his sense of paranoia.

Equally disturbing is the installation Control Order House. In December 2011 and January 2012, Clark was given exclusive access to a suburban house in England in which a British man suspected of involvement in terrorist-related activity was living under the terms of a Home Office enforced control order — a form of detention without trial based on secret evidence.

The installation contains nearly 500 photographs of the house in the order in which he took them. Two video sequences, on display for the first time, convey the tension, claustrophobia and monotony of a controlled person’s life, while documents, architectural plans and photographs reveal further details of life under a control order.

As an exhibition exploring the complexities of modern asymmetric warfare and its implications for human rights, this is a must-see.

The exhibition is free and runs until August 28 2017, opening times:

‘Guantanamo Diary’ author to be freed at last

This video says about itself:

22 July 2016

The author of the best-selling memoir “Guantanamo Diary,” Mohamedou Ould Slahi has been cleared for release after being held at the military prison for 14 years without charge.

Mohamedou Ould Slahi freed without charge at last: here.

The New Yorker investigates Obama’s failure to close Guantanamo.

Last Tuesday, United States military officials escorted a dozen journalists and human-rights representatives into a sealed Pentagon conference room to watch the live video feed of a “hearing” before the Guantanamo Bay detention center “Periodic Review Board,” which will advise the Obama administration on the fate of Abu Zubaydah, one of 41 inmates still not cleared for release or transfer eight years after Obama pledged to close the military prison: here.

Close Guantanamo torture prison, petition

This video says about itself:

Torture -The Guantanamo Guidebook

28 August 2012

UK’s channel 4 “Guantanamo Handbook” documentary

From Congresswoman Barbara Lee in the USA today:

It’s long past time to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Fellow Progressive.

Indefinite detentions do not promote our democratic ideals and the ongoing use of the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay is an affront to American values. President Obama has asked Congress to work with him to shut it down – join his call for action now.

This is about more than values. Our use of Guantanamo Bay is serving as a recruiting tool for terrorists. Congress’s failure to close Guantanamo is jeopardizing our national security. Americans don’t have to accept this. We need to speak up.

You can join President Obama in asking Congress to advance our values and our security. Add your name to demand action.

Tell Congress: Close Guantanamo Bay!

Obama Administration No Longer Pursuing Executive Order To Shut Down Guantanamo: Report: here.