Florida Islamophobe’s crusade against Arabic numerals

This video says about itself:

3 September 2013

Hank unravels the fascinating yarn of how the world came to use so-called Arabic numerals — from the scholarship of ancient Hindu mathematicians, to Muslim scientist Al-Khwarizmi, to the merchants of medieval Italy.

By Tom Boggioni in the USA:

Conservative Florida mom vows to stop her children from learning about Islam and Arabic numerals

06 Oct 2015 at 14:29 ET

A Florida mom posted a rambling 15 minute video to her Facebook account complaining that her son’s high school world history class textbook spends an entire chapter on Muslims and advances in the Islamic world, including the “origin of Ay-rabic numerals.”

According to the post by Christian Kayla Normandin, she had previously promised to share a video detailing objections she has with the history book being used in her son’s class. …

Touching upon developments in education, astronomy, architecture, art, agriculture, science and mathematics in the Islamic world, Normandin drew attention to the development of the Arabic numeric system — the most common numeric system used in the world today.

“It even has the origin of ‘Ay-rabic’ numerals,” she read from the book …

Following her review of the chapter, Normandin asserted, “We need to stand up against this, y’all. Our children don’t need to be taught this. It’s not teaching them facts. It’s not teaching them truth. It’s basically telling them that this is going to be the way of life.”

She went on to state that she will go as far as she needs to go to get the textbook pulled, saying, “My children aren’t going to learn this.”

Roman mosaic discovery in Italy

This video says about itself:

14 January 2008

A short film about Roman mosaics. The film shows a series of Roman mosaics and information about their construction.

From Discovery News:

Ancient Roman Mosaic Found in Tuscany

Oct 6, 2015 02:30 PM ET // by Rossella Lorenzi

Italian archaeologists digging in a small Tuscan village have unearthed part of what they believe is a large and impressive ancient Roman mosaic.

Laying in a private property next to a local road in the village Capraia e Limite, the mosaic features two different designs. One, dating to the second half of the 4th century AD, features geometric patterns framed by floral motifs, the other, dating to the 5th century AD, boasts octagons decorated with animals, flowers and a human bust.

The large mosaic graced the floor of a luxurious Roman villa that stood in the Tuscan countryside for four centuries, from the 1st to the beginning of the 6th century AD.

Photos: See Images of the Mosaic

“Evidence of this villa was first found in 1983, when workers digging to build an orchard unearthed some black and white mosaic fragments and, most interestingly, an inscription mentioning one of the owners of the complex,” Lorella Alderighi of the Archaeological Superintendency of Tuscany, told Discovery News.

The inscribed slab of stone referred to Vettius Agorius Praetextatus, one of the most famous pagan senators of the later fourth century AD. He came from an ancient and noble family and died in 384 while serving as the praetorian prefect at the court of Emperor Valentinian II.

It is well known that Vettius Agorius Praetextatus owned villas in Tuscany — and liked them very much.

“The Roman statesman and orator Quintus Aurelius Symmachus even complained in his letters that Vettius enjoyed too much opium in his estates in Etruria, instead of dealing with politics in Rome,” Federico Cantini, the archaeologist of the University of Pisa who led the dig, told Discovery News.

Built in the first century, the villa in Capraia e Limite had its most glorious time in the 4th century AD, when Vettius Agorius Praetextatus rebuilt it according to luxurious standards. By the beginning of the 6th century AD it was completely abandoned and plundered.

1500-Year-Old Mosaic Map Found

“Luckily, they could not remove the mosaics,” Alderighi said.

Excavations in 2013 brought to light a stunning oval mosaic with a wild boar hunting scene which dates to the second half of the 4th century AD.

Because of legal issues and lack of funding, the mosaic was covered soon after its discovery in order to preserve it. The finding prompted new archaeological investigations.

“We speculated the mosaic floor extends further, thus we tested the hypothesis with a survey dig,” Cantini said.

The excavation proved Cantini and his team were right.

Parts of two floor mosaics came to light. The older one consisted of geometric patterns framed by red decorations with acanthus and vine leaves in various shades of grey, blue and black. The other displayed scenes with animals, flowers, geometric patterns framed by octagons. Catching the attention at the center of one of such octagons, is the bust of a man with a tunic and large eyes.

“We believe it is not a portrait, but just a decoration,” Alderighi said.

According to the archaeologists, the investigated portion of the villa had an hexagonal structure with rooms opening onto a central hall.

“We estimate the size of the floor mosaic to be about 300 square meters (984 square feet). We only have unearthed one-eighth of it,” Cantini said.

Photos: Greek God Hermes Featured in Ancient Mosaic

Unfortunately, most of the mosaic lies beneath an industrial shed. Although the archaeologists believe the artwork is still intact, it is unlikely it will be brought to light in the near future.

The newly unearthed mosaics have been already covered for preservation — just like the mosaic with the hunting scene.

“Our goal is to open these beautiful artworks to the public. We are working to make this happen,” Alessandro Giunti, mayor of Capraia e Limite, said.

He added that the first mosaic to be restored and displayed will be the one showing the wild boar hunting scene.

Worst ever British monarch, poll

This video says about itself:

The Most Evil Men and Women in History – Episode Fourteen – Bloody Mary Tudor

16 September 2014

Mary I was the fourth crowned monarch of the Tudor dynasty, she is remembered for restoring England to Roman Catholicism after succeeding her half-brother, Edward VI, to the English throne. In the process, she had almost 300 religious dissenters burned at the stake in the Marian Persecutions, earning her the sobriquet of “Bloody Mary”.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Who is our worst monarch of all time? The people have spoken

A poll of 1,579 British adults by YouGov has shown that the public considers Henry VIII to be our worst ever monarch.

Which would you consider to be our worst-ever monarch?

Survey of 1,579 British adults between 3-4 September 2015. Figures as a per cent, not including answers of “Don’t know”.

19 Henry VIII
7 Other
6 King Canute
3 William the Conqueror
1 Alfred the Great
1 Elizabeth I
1 Victoria

Henry VIII is perhaps best known for his six wives and his separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church, leading to the dissolution of the monasteries.

King Canute ranks second in our public opinion, with 6 per cent of the vote, whereas James I ranked third worst, with 5 per cent.

Among Labour supporters, Elizabeth II ranks as fourth worst on the given list of monarchs with four per cent naming her as the worst to sit upon the throne, whereas 0 per cent of Conservative supporters nominated her as the worst.

On Wednesday at around 5.30pm, Queen Elizabeth II becomes the longest-ever reigning monarch of the United Kingdom.

She will have reigned for 63 years and seven months, surpassing Queen Victoria’s record.

I am a bit surprised that Bloody Mary, Charles I, Charles II, James II, George III and George IV are not options in the multiple choice question.

Witches, how Bruegel, other artists, depicted them

This video is about the exhibition De heksen van Bruegel (Bruegel‘s witches), in the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht, the Netherlands; 19 September 2015 till 31 January 2016.

Translated from the site Museumkaart.nl:

Witches are ugly women, who fly on brooms or make magic potions in a big pot on a stove. That is the image we have today of witches. But who knows that this originated in the work of the famous Brabant artist Pieter Bruegel?

Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht presents the first exhibition about witches in art.

For just one time you can see a unique collection of witch scenes from the turbulent period of witch persecutions in the Netherlands (1450-1700).
The Witches of Bruegel is a journey through the most beautiful and impressive depictions of witches produced the Low Countries. From the first images of witches in legal treatises and precious manuscripts, to the matchless prints by Pieter Bruegel and the spectacular depictions of sabbaths by his followers. A journey through the evolution of the witch image. From fear to fantasy, from nightmare to fairytale figure.