Basilisk lizard at Panama bird feeder


This video says about itself:

Common Basilisk Snatches Fruit From Panama Feeder – May 7, 2018

Watch LIVE 24/7 with highlights and viewing resources at http://allaboutbirds.org/panamafeeders

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Canopy Family.

I saw a common basilisk in Costa Rica.

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Thick-billed euphonias in Panama


This video says about itself:

Thick-billed Euphonias Congregate On Panama Fruit Feeder – April 26, 2018

Watch and listen as a small group of Thick-billed Euphonias congregate on cam and exchange sweet, burry notes across the feeder platform. Male Thick-billed Euphonias are mainly glossy steel blue with a yellow forecrown patch that reaches to just behind the eye, and bright yellow underparts including the throat. Females are, like those of most euphonias, much duller, being olive above and yellow below. You may also notice a few olive-backed individuals with the signature yellow forecrown of the male birds—these are immature males that have yet to molt into their full adult plumage.

Watch LIVE 24/7 with highlights and viewing resources at http://allaboutbirds.org/panamafeeders

Clay-colored thrush sings, forages in Panama


This video says about itself:

Clay-colored Thrush Singing and Foraging on Fruit, April 24, 2018

Watch LIVE 24/7 with highlights and viewing resources at http://allaboutbirds.org/panamafeeders

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Canopy Family.

Panamanian lance-tailed manakins on video


This video says about itself:

Successful Displays and Copulation, April 13, 2018 | Lance-tailed Manakin Cam

Watch Live at http://allaboutbirds.org/manakins

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999.

Lance-tailed Manakins are small passerine birds in the family Pipridae that live in secondary growth forests of Western Panama, Columbia, and Venezuela. Male Lance-tailed Manakins are black with a blue back and red crest; females are olive-green with orange legs, and have an orange or red crest.

Young males initially look like females, but pass through two intermediate subadult plumages before attaining adult coloration in their 4th year after hatching. Lance-tailed Manakins are primarily frugivorous, and manakins as a group are important seed dispersers in tropical forests.

Lance-tailed manakins’ mating season in Panama


This video says about itself:

Successful Displays & Multiple Copulations, April 11, 2018

Watch Live at http://allaboutbirds.org/manakins

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999.

Lance-tailed Manakins are small passerine birds in the family Pipridae that live in secondary growth forests of Western Panama, Columbia, and Venezuela. Male Lance-tailed Manakins are black with a blue back and red crest; females are olive-green with orange legs, and have an orange or red crest. Young males initially look like females, but pass through two intermediate subadult plumages before attaining adult coloration in their 4th year after hatching. Lance-tailed Manakins are primarily frugivorous, and manakins as a group are important seed dispersers in tropical forests.

Rufous motmots, other birds in Panama


This video says about itself:

Rufous Motmot Pair Sample Fruit, April 11, 2018—Panama Fruit Feeder Cam

Two colorful Rufous Motmots forage on fresh fruit at the Panama Fruit Feeder cam site at the Canopy Lodge.

Watch LIVE 24/7 with highlights and viewing resources at http://allaboutbirds.org/panamafeeders

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Canopy Family.

The Panama Fruit Feeder Cam is located on the grounds of the Canopy Lodge in El Valle de Antón, Panama. This site is just over 2,000 ft above sea level in the low mountains of Cerro Gaital, with a mild springtime climate year-round. A small stream called Rio Guayabo runs past the feeders in the background, and the lush landscaping of the Canopy Lodge grounds grade into the forested slopes around them. The feeding table is around 40 feet from the main lodge, and is one of several feeders provisioned throughout the day so that guests to the lodge are greeted to spectacular views of many of the common birds found in this ecosystem.

Some Panamanian frogs recovering from epidemic


This video says about itself:

Frogs vs. Fungus | National Geographic

22 September 2009

Panama’s golden frog is a symbol of good luck and prosperity. Now researchers are fighting to save the rare amphibian from a naturally occuring – and deadly – fungus.

That was then. And now …

From Science, 30 March 2018:

Shifts in disease dynamics in a tropical amphibian assemblage are not due to pathogen attenuation

Resistance is not futile

The fungal disease chytridiomycosis has wreaked havoc on amphibians worldwide. The disease is caused by the organism Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and was first identified in the late 1990s. Voyles et al. revisited protected areas in Panama where catastrophic amphibian losses were recorded a decade ago (see the Perspective by Collins). Although disease theory predicts that epidemics should result in reduced pathogenicity, they found no evidence for such a reduction. Despite this, the amphibian community is displaying signs of recovery—including some species presumed extinct after the outbreak. Increased host resistance may be responsible for this recovery.

Abstract

Infectious diseases rarely end in extinction. Yet the mechanisms that explain how epidemics subside are difficult to pinpoint. We investigated host-pathogen interactions after the emergence of a lethal fungal pathogen in a tropical amphibian assemblage. Some amphibian host species are recovering, but the pathogen is still present and is as pathogenic today as it was almost a decade ago. In addition, some species have defenses that are more effective now than they were before the epidemic. These results suggest that host recoveries are not caused by pathogen attenuation and may be due to shifts in host responses. Our findings provide insights into the mechanisms underlying disease transitions, which are increasingly important to understand in an era of emerging infectious diseases and unprecedented global pandemics.

See also here.