Sloth swims in Panama, video


This BBC video, from Planet Earth II, recorded in Panama, says about itself:

7 November 2016

A pygmy three-toed sloth swims between mangroves on the island of Escudo on the hunt for a mate.

Lance-tailed manakins in Panama update


This video from Panama says about itself:

Morning Visit to the Display Perch, Short Display—Lance-tailed Manakin Cam

18 May 2016

The Lance-tailed Manakin Cam is a collaboration between Florida State University researcher Dr. Emily DuVal and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology‘s Bird Cams project.

Watch live and learn more about manakins here.

This 18 May 2016 video is called Long Perch Maintenance Bout—Lance-tailed Manakin Cam.

Manakins dancing in Panama, new videos


This video from Panama says about itself:

Early Morning Single Male Dancing, May 12, 2016 [Lance-tailed Manakin Cam]

When not much is going on, males “groom” the area around their perch, pulling off chunks of leaves that get too close to the major stick. They also bite at the stick, perhaps to smooth the dancing surface? This behavior leaves little perpendicular marks on the display perch itself, and this worn appearance is one feature that clues us in to exactly which stick in a cluster is the perch used for dancing.

The Lance-tailed Manakin Cam is a collaboration between Florida State University researcher Dr. Emily DuVal and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology‘s Bird Cams project.

Watch live and learn more about manakins here.

This video from Panama says about itself:

Short Morning Display, May 12, 2016 [Lance-tailed Manakin Cam]

This video from Panama says about itself:

Rufous-and-white Wren Visits the Lance-tailed Manakin Display Area, May 12, 2016

This video from Panama says about itself:

Two Males Display May 13, 2016 [Lance-tailed Manakin Cam]

Manakin mating season in Panama


This video from Panama says about itself:

Morning Courtship Session, May 4, 2016

The Lance-tailed Manakin Cam is a collaboration between Florida State University researcher Dr. Emily DuVal and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology‘s Bird Cams project.

Learn more about manakins and watch live here.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this:

This year we’ve been working behind-the-scenes with collaborators from Florida State University to bring you a view of a phenomenon that can be difficult to see: the dance of the Lance-tailed Manakin. Dr. Emily DuVal and her group have been studying a population of manakins in Panama for many years, chipping away at the mysteries behind the interesting social structure of Lance-tailed Manakins.

Thanks to her hard work, we’ve been able to get a “beta” cam system up and running this year as a proof-of-concept that we hope to improve upon for next season. The cam shows a single display perch that is used by a pair of male manakins to court females. The dances themselves are a low-frequency event, with only a handful to a dozen happening within any given day; however, they are complex and beautiful, with the males vocalizing and dancing in a highly coordinated way. The background audio often contains howler monkeys, cicadas, and the vocalizations of other birds, and is a beautiful backdrop to any scene.