Lance-tailed manakin display and copulation


This video says about itself:

Frenzied Lance-tailed Manakin Displays and Successful Copulation, April 19, 2017

The alpha [manakin PGVm] displayed with his old beta (SAmY) but the female solicited copulation in the middle of the leapfrog and SAmY started to oblige. PGVm attacked him and drove him off and copulated with the female 2 minutes later. A third male came in to check it all out, and SAmY came over and chased HIM off (this happened off camera).

Watch live here.

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999.

Lance-tailed manakins’ mating dance video


This video says about itself:

Epic Lance-tailed Manakin Dance and Display Sequence with Female, April 15, 2017

Two male Lance-tailed Manakins work together to convince a visiting female that the alpha male is worth mating with.

Watch live here.

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999. Lance-tailed Manakins are small passerine birds in the family Pipridae that live in secondary growth forests of Western Panama, Columbia, and Venezuela.

Lance-tailed manakins’ display in Panama


This video says about itself:

Trio of Manakins Practices Courtship Displays – Apr. 11, 2017

When there are no females around to entertain, the male Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava hone their courtship skills by practicing dance displays together.

Watch live here.

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999.

Manakin and wren in Panama


This video says about itself:

Rufous-and-white Wren Joins Female Manakin on Display Perch – Apr. 10, 2017

This cam shows one display perch in a population of Lance-tailed Manakins on Isla Boca Brava, Chiriquí, Panamá, that has been monitored intensively since 1999. Lance-tailed Manakins are small passerine birds in the family Pipridae that live in secondary growth forests of Western Panama, Columbia, and Venezuela.

Male Lance-tailed Manakins are black with a blue back and red crest; females are olive-green with orange legs, and have an orange or red crest. Young males initially look like females, but pass through two intermediate subadult plumages before attaining adult coloration in their 4th year after hatching. Lance-tailed Manakins are primarily frugivorous, and manakins as a group are important seed dispersers in tropical forests.

Watch live here.

Lance-tailed manakin webcam in Panama


This video from Panama says about itself:

20 March 2017

Male Lance-tailed Manakins go to great lengths to keep a well maintained display perch. Notice how this male “cleans” the area by tearing away at leaves in the area and scratching the surfaces of the surrounding branches with his beak.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

The Manakin Cam Returns

On the small Panamanian island of Boca Brava, male Lance-tailed Manakins are beginning to compete for mates—which they do by working together. You’ll have a front row seat when you watch our live cam.

The Cornell Lab has partnered with Dr. Emily DuVal to bring this live view of manakins to your screen. She has been studying these cooperative displays since 1999, unraveling the mystery of why males form alliances and work together to woo females—even though only one male typically gets to mate.

Here’s what to look for: The live cam shows a display perch used by one pair of males, within a larger area with up to 30 “alpha” males and their partners. Throughout the day, the males perform coordinated displays featuring leaps and butterfly-like flights on the display perch.

Occasionally, a brownish female stops by to watch. If she seems interested and receptive, the beta male typically leaves the area and the alpha male starts displaying on his own.

Through much of the day the perch may appear empty; but you can often hear the sweet calls of the male manakins singing a duet, trying to entice a female to check out one of their meticulously maintained display perches (they also have two other display areas off-cam). When the manakins aren’t around, other species (like this antshrike, this wren, or even this wood-rail!) may wander into the frame, and in the mornings and evenings the roaring of howler monkeys echoes through the forest.

Share what you see and hear with us on the cam’s Twitter feed, @ManakinCam, and join us in learning more about these gorgeous birds and their complicated approach to courtship. Save up your questions—Dr. DuVal will be joining us for a live Q&A session in the near future. Stay tuned for more details, and thanks for watching.

Pygmy sloths in Panama video


This video from Panama says about itself:

Life as a Pygmy SlothPlanet Earth II – Islands Behind The Scenes

19 December 2016

Pygmy sloths are home to an unusually varied number of creatures.

Panama’s beautiful wildlife, video


This video says about itself:

13 December 2016

This compilation of birds, reptiles and mammals footage was filmed exclusively in 4K (3840 x 2160) in the wild during a one week span in Panama in December 2016 in the regions of Gamboa, Soberania and Summit and features the following species:

Broad-billed Motmot (Electron clatyrhynchum)
Blue-crowned Motmot (Momotus coeruliceps)
Swainson’s Toucan (Ramphastos ambiguus swainsonii)
Keel-billed Toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus)
Green-and-rufous Kingfisher (Chloroceryle inda)
Blue-crowned Manakin (Lepidothrix coronata)
Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis)
Cinnamon Woodpecker (Celeus loricatus)
Squirrel Cuckoo (Piaya cayana)
Slaty-tailed Trogon (Trogon massena)
Gartered Trogon (Trogon caligatus)
Spectacled Owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata)
Violet-bellied Hummingbird (Damophila julie)
White-necked Jacobin (Florisuga mellivora)
Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)
Crimson-crested Woodpecker (Campephilus melanoleucos)
White-faced Capuchin Monkey (Cebus capucinos)
White-nosed Coati (Nassua narica)
Mantled Howler Monkey (Allouatta palliata)
Central America Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
Black-chested Jay (Cyanocorax affinis)
Lesser Kiskadee (Pitangus lictor)
Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (Amazilia tzacatl)
Red-eared Turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans)
Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea)
Fasciated Antshrike (Cymbilaimus lineatus)
Mealy Parrot (Amazona farinosa)
Semiplumbeous Hawk (Leucopternis semiplumbea)
Long-billed Hermit (Phaethornis longirostris)
Chestnut-headed Oropendola (Psarocolius wagleri)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)
Brown Vinesnake (Oxybelis aeneus)
Yellow-headed Caracara (Milvago chimachima)

Song by Snow Music Studio via Audio Jungle

© The 4K Guy 2016