Save Caribbean sharks


This 26 August 2015 video was recorded in the Oceanium, the big aquarium in Rotterdam Zoo in the Netherlands. It is about marking there the start of the three years long Save Our Sharks campaign, by the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance.

This campaign aims to help sharks in the Caribbean to survive. There are about thirty shark species in the Caribbean.

This video is called Jonathan Bird examines one of the world’s most photographed–yet least studied–sharks, the Caribbean Reef shark.

Shark study in the Netherlands


This video says about itself:

15 April 2015

School sharks, Galeorhinus galeus, in a Fuerteventura beach (Canary Islands).

There used to be quite some sharks around the Dutch Wadden Sea islands; mainly starry smooth-hound sharks and school sharks.

However, ever since the 1970s, their numbers declined.

Recently, some fishermen say the numbers are going up again.

To see whether that is true, some shrimp fishermen will tag sharks which they catch, and release them.

Today, 28 August 2015, was supposed to be the start of this. However, the shark caught today was too small to tag, so it was freed without having been tagged.

Basking shark off California, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

On May 5, 2012 our whale watching boat, Manute’a, encountered a rare Basking Shark off the coast of Dana Point. The animal was estimated to be about 20 feet long. These plankton eating sharks are the second largest fish in the world; only a whale shark is bigger. Whale watchers were awestruck when this huge shark turned and swam right up next to the boat!

Shark beached on Schiermonnikoog island


This 17 August 2014 video by a diver in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands shows a common smooth-hound shark.

Translated from conservation organisation Natuurmonumenten in the Netherlands:

Friday, August 21st, 2015

In mid-August participants in the beachcombers’ excursion on Schiermonnikoog found a very special find! THe Volunteer Collective of National Park Schiermonnikoog found at beach post 5 a one meter long common smooth-hound shark. …

The eyes and a part of the gills were already gone, but otherwise the shark was still completely intact.

Big dinosaur age shark discovery


Cretaceous fossil sharks reconstruction. Credit: Frederickson et al.

From LiveScience:

20-Foot Monster Shark Once Trolled Mesozoic Seas

by Tia Ghose, Senior Writer

June 03, 2015 02:01pm ET

A giant shark the size of a two-story building prowled the shallow seas 100 million years ago, new fossils reveal.

The massive fish, Leptostyrax macrorhiza, would have been one of the largest predators of its day, and may push back scientists’ estimates of when such gigantic predatory sharks evolved, said study co-author Joseph Frederickson, a doctoral candidate in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Oklahoma.

The ancient sea monster was discovered by accident. Frederickson, who was then an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, had started an amateur paleontology club to study novel fossil deposits. In 2009, the club took a trip to the Duck Creek Formation, just outside Fort Worth, Texas, which contains myriad marine invertebrate fossils, such as the extinct squidlike creatures known as ammonites. About 100 million years ago the area was part of a shallow sea known as the Western Interior Seaway that split North America in two and spanned from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic, Frederickson said.

While walking in the formation, Frederickson’s then-girlfriend (now wife), University of Oklahoma anthropology doctoral candidate Janessa Doucette-Frederickson, tripped over a boulder and noticed a large vertebra sticking out of the ground. Eventually, the team dug out three large vertebrae, each about 4.5 inches (11.4 centimeters) in diameter. [See Images of Ancient Monsters of the Sea]

“You can hold one in your hand,” but then nothing else will fit, Frederickson told Live Science.

The vertebrae had stacks of lines called lamellae around the outside, suggesting the bones once belonged to a broad scientific classification of sharks called lamniformes that includes sand tiger sharks, great white sharks, goblin sharks and others, Frederickson said.

After poring over the literature, Frederickson found a description of a similar shark vertebra that was unearthed in 1997 in the Kiowa Shale in Kansas, which also dates to about 100 million years ago. That vertebra came from a shark that was up to 32 feet (9.8 meters) long.

By comparing the new vertebra with the one from Kansas, the team concluded the Texas shark was likely the same species as the Kansas specimen. The Texan could have been at least 20.3 feet (6.2 m) long, though that is a conservative estimate, Frederickson said. (Still, the Texas shark would have been no match for the biggest shark that ever lived, the 60-foot-long, or 18 m, Megalodon.)

By analyzing similar ecosystems from the Mesozoic Era, the team concluded the sharks in both Texas and Kansas were probably Leptostyrax macrorhiza. Previously, the only fossils from Leptostyrax that paleontologists had found were teeth, making it hard to gauge the shark’s true size. The new study, which was published today (June 3) in the journal PLOS ONE, suggests this creature was much bigger than previously thought, Frederickson said.

Still, it’s not certain the new vertebrae belonged to Leptostyrax, said Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University in Chicago, who unearthed the 1997 shark vertebra.

“It is also entirely possible that they may belong to an extinct shark with very small teeth so far not recognized in the present fossil record,” Shimada, who was not involved in the current study, told Live Science. “For example, some of the largest modern-day sharks are plankton-feeding forms with minute teeth, such as the whale shark, basking shark and megamouth shark.”

Either way, the new finds change the picture of the Early Cretaceous seas.

Previously, researchers thought the only truly massive predators of the day were the fearsome pliosaurs, long-necked, long-snouted relatives to modern-day lizards that could grow to nearly 40 feet (12 m) in length. Now, it seems the oceans were teeming with enough life to support at least two top predators, Frederickson said.

As for the ancient shark’s feeding habits, they might resemble those of modern great white sharks, who “eat whatever fits in their mouth,” Frederickson said. If these ancient sea monsters were similar, they might have fed on large fish, baby pliosaurs, marine reptiles and even full-grown pliosaurs that they scavenged, Frederickson said.

Beach visitors save injured hammerhead shark


This video from the USA says about itself:

Brothers Save Hammerhead Shark. Destin, Florida 2015

21 July 2015

Me and my brother fight to save an injured hammerhead shark on the Destin, FL shoreline and bravely took it to safety away from the public. My brother, once realizing it was injured, swam out to bring it to shore away from people still in the water. I filmed this heroic display as he dragged the injured 10 ft. hammerhead to shore. The shark was pulled to shore and we realized it had several deep sea fishing hooks in its mouth as well as steel fishing line tangled in and around its head. My brother, along with help from bystanders worked to get the hooks out and save the dying shark. My brother was able to pull the shark into deeper water until it was able to swim away safely in an attempt to avoid further injuring itself or the public.

All of the distress and yelling heard in the background were caused by a natural fear from certain individuals and lack of understanding the situation as well as the behaviors of hammerhead sharks. Once bystanders realized we were trying to help the shark they quickly did what they could to help

Shot on a GoPro Hero 3+ and iPhone 5

From WJHG.com in Florida in the USA:

Visitors Help Hammerhead Shark

Tue 9:51 PM, July 21, 2015

By: Zak Dahlheimer

DESTIN– UPDATE: 7/21/15 6:24 P.M.

Marcus and Logan Lakos try to make it down to the Panhandle for the summer every year.

But this year’s visit they say came with a catch.

Marcus captured his younger brother Logan pulling an injured hammerhead shark to shore at Henderson Beach State Park Monday, where they eventually removed two hooks and a lure from its mouth.

And now with battle scars after pulling the shark to shore, Logan says it was a wave of adrenaline that came over him, looking out for his mother also in the water.

“I started pulling it in and it was kind of scary, but hammerhead sharks aren’t really that dangerous to humans,” said Logan. “Knowing that, I pulled it in. Everyone else was freaking out so it was hard to bring him in. But once people started realizing we were trying to help it, some of the other guys around were all crowding around it and trying to help it.”

When he saw his brother going to save the shark, Marcus says his first instinct was to get this on video.

“I’m just like, ‘I’m going to grab my camera,'” said Marcus. “Because Logan, he’s the brave one. He’s swimming out trying to help grab it, so I wanted to grab whatever I can on film since I’m the film person. I’m sitting there, and out of nowhere, he’s dragging this thing onto shore.”

After originally pulling it onshore, both brothers say the shark ended up swimming back out into the water. After that they say they went about 50 to 100 feet down the beach, where they ended up pulling the two hooks and lure out of the shark’s mouth.

Both brothers say they’ve received praise from people who witnessed the event.

But Logan says it was really about grabbing life by the tail.

“If you see a shark out in the water, it’s not always a bad thing to grab your camera and enjoy one of nature’s greatest creatures,” said Logan.

Logan says the shark did not appear to have any other injuries after the hooks are lure were removed.

Marcus Lakos and his brother, Logan, were visiting Destin from Texas when they saw a hammerhead shark swimming near the beach.

They say Logan noticed something hanging out from the shark’s mouth and pulled it by its tail to the shore.

With the help of a few bystanders, Logan took out what appears to be a steel hook from a deep sea fishing line that was caught in the shark’s mouth.

Both brothers say they know something about sharks, Logan is an avid fisherman, and say they had an idea the shark would not hurt them.

Indonesian fish and coral research


Whale shark

November 2011. Read here about marine research in Indonesia: tagging whale sharks, maybe new fish species discovered, and coral.