Dead whales feed other animals


This video says about itself:

Dead Whale Carcass Feast – Blue PlanetBBC Earth

26 February 2017

In Alaska, humpback whales feed on plankton in the shallow water. When one whale perishes in the treacherous waters, scavengers on the coastline such as black bears, wolves and gulls feed from the carcass.

This video says about itself:

Sharks Feasting On A Whale Carcass – Blue Planet – BBC Earth

3 March 2017

Rare footage of Sleeper Sharks, Hagfish and a whole succession of deep sea scavengers feasting on the carcass of a 30 tonne Grey Whale.

Tropical shark in Britain, first ever


This 2 March 2017 video is called Crocodile Shark discovered in UK waters for first time.

From the BBC:

Crocodile Shark discovered in UK waters for first time

2 March 2017

A tropical species of shark has been found on the UK coastline for the first time in recorded history, marine experts said.

A Crocodile Shark carcass was discovered on a beach at Hope Cove near Plymouth and was reported to the National Marine Aquarium.

Experts think the animal, normally found in tropical waters, may have died from the shock of UK’s colder seas.

It is commonly found in Brazil and Australia growing to about 1m (3.3ft).

Steven Greenfields spotted the shark washed up on the beach while walking with his family.

Warmer waters

Mr Greenfields said: “We regularly visit this beach and have never seen anything like this before. My whole family was stunned as the animal had really unusual features but was unmistakably a shark.

Because it was so unusual we consulted our local aquarium to confirm what species it was.”

James Wright, curator at the National Marine Aquarium, said: “This species has never been recorded in the UK before, as it is normally found in deep waters during the day in tropical climates, such as Brazil and Australia, then coming shallower at night to feed.

“With the Crocodile Shark accustomed to much warmer waters, travelling so far and reaching colder waters would have caused a shock to its system and account for the cause of death.

“We would urge the public to share any other unusual sightings with us or The Shark Trust, so we can monitor any trends.”

Paul Cox, managing director of the Shark Trust, said: “Any information that we can get is useful so it’s great that this one has been reported and identified.”

Blacktip shark saved from fishing line


This video says about itself:

Occurred on February 9th, 2017 / Jensen Beach, Florida, USA

“Myself and two of my buddies were at the beach fishing for jacks and bluefish while we saw a shark struggling in the surf. We realized it was wrapped around something and ran to see if we could help. At this point my buddy Adam jumped into the surf to rescue the blacktip shark. We then got the fishing line unwrapped from around the body and took the hook out of its jaw. Adam then released the shark and it swam off to live another day.

See also here.

New hammerhead shark species discovery in Belize


This video says about itself:

5 February 2017

Scientists have discovered a new population of miniature sharks off the coast of Belize. The bonnethead, a small species of hammerhead shark, can be found in many spots around the Caribbean. However, the new shark is an entirely different species based on large genetic differences between them and other bonnetheads. Bonnethead sharks are commercially fished in the United States, throughout the Caribbean and in South America. The recording of the new shark was reportedly made during a 2016 shark tagging expedition.

From The Reporter in Belize:

New hammerhead shark species found in Belize

Posted by The Reporter newspaper on February 9, 2017 at 10:42 am

By Benjamin Flowers

Shark researchers have discovered a new species of shark in Belize.

Researchers from Florida International University (FIU) were conducting DNA sequencing on bonnet head sharks, a species of hammer head sharks, when they made the discovery.

The bonnet head shark is found in the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States; however, the DNA of the species found in Belize did not match that of the bonnet heads found anywhere else. The bonnet heads found in Belize, which have yet to be named, have the same physical appearance as its counterparts within the region, but have large genetic differences.

Evaluating the DNA analysis conducted by Andrew Fields from Stony Brook University, FIU researchers estimated that the bonnet head sharks around the nation stopped interbreeding with those from Mexico, the United States and the Bahamas several million years ago.

Demian Chapman, lead researcher on the team that made the discovery, said that the find raises concerns about the sustainability measures in place to keep the species from extinction. While the bonnet head is ranked at “Least Concern” for extinction risk by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, the union made the classification assuming there was a single species of bonnet head.

“Now we have to define the range of each of these species individually and assess them independently against where the potential threats are,” Chapman said.

Chapman who is currently leading a shark survey project called Global Finprint, believes that the discovery could be the door way to finding even more new species of sharks.

Global Finprint is an initiative seeking to determine the cause for the decreasing number of sharks and rays.

Fish in ocean food chain, video


This 3 February 2017 video says about itself:

Predators Attack Fish Bait Ball – Blue Planet – BBC Earth

3 feb. 2017

Small fish swim at phenomenal speed and form a daunting bait ball in a desperate attempt to ward off hungry predators [like sharks].

Pacific sharks on video


This video says about itself:

Thousands Of Sharks Visit A Sea Mount – Blue Planet – BBC Earth

27 January 2017

In the Pacific, a tiny island 300 miles away from the shore hides a giant mountain beneath the waves that forms a home for thousands of plankton feeding fish. These fish attract tuna, and the tuna attract thousands of sharks. Watch this video to learn more about this fascinating food chain, and hear some weird but true facts about the visiting hammerhead sharks..

Taken From Blue Planet Series 1.