Young roe deer drives away cat


This 23 May 2018 video shows a young roe deer driving away a black cat in the Speulderbos woodland in the Veluwe region in the Netherlands.

Henk Kroon made this video.

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Cute marine animals video


This video from the USA says about itself:

5 Sea Creatures Cuter than Cats! | BLUE WORLD ACADEMY

23 February 2018

Jonathan explains why there should be less cat videos and more beluga videos in this goofy short video about the cutest creatures in the sea.

BLUE WORLD ACADEMY is a studio-based spin-off of the underwater YouTube program JONATHAN BIRD‘S BLUE WORLD featuring host Jonathan Bird.

Good wildcat news from Dutch Limburg


This 2014 video is the first ever footage of a wildcat in Limburg province in the Netherlands.

Since then, this species has expanded. On 7 January 2018, ARK Natuurontwikkeling estimated there are now at least 14 of these cats in Dutch Limburg. Kittens were born in 2017 at at least two spots. At one of them, at least five young wildcats were born.

What a Dutch wildcat ate


This video is about European wildcats in Bavaria in Germany.

Since a few years ago, wildcats are back in the Netherlands; where they had been extinct for a long time.

Translated from Dutch daily De Volkskrant, 10 December 2017:

A wildcat that was killed in February at the village of Nijswiller in the south of Limburg province had nine prey animals in his stomach: five wood mice, two yellow-necked wood mice, one harvest mouse and one common vole. He was not only well fed with a varied menu, but also very healthy and only had bad luck when crossing the N281 highway.

Saber-toothed cat evolution, new research


This 2017 video from the USA is called Prehistoric Predators – Sabertooth.

From ScienceDaily:

Ancient DNA offers new view on saber-toothed cats‘ past

October 19, 2017

Researchers who’ve analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from ancient samples representing two species of saber-toothed cats have a new take on the animals’ history over the last 50,000 years. The data suggest that the saber-toothed cats shared a common ancestor with all living cat-like species about 20 million years ago. The two saber-toothed cat species under study diverged from each other about 18 million years ago.

“It’s quite crazy that, in terms of their mitochondrial DNA, these two saber-toothed cats are more distant from each other than tigers are from house cats,” says Johanna Paijmans at the University of Potsdam in Germany.

Paijmans and colleagues reconstructed the mitochondrial genomes from ancient-DNA samples representing three Homotherium from Europe and North America and one Smilodon specimen from South America. One of the Homotherium specimens under investigation is a unique fossil: a 28,000-year-old mandible recovered from the North Sea.

“This find was so special because Homotherium is generally believed to have gone extinct in Europe around 300,000 years ago, so [this specimen is] over 200,000 years younger than the next-to-youngest Homotherium find in Europe,” Paijmans explains.

The new DNA evidence confirmed that this surprisingly young specimen did indeed belong to a Homotherium. The discovery suggests that the saber-toothed cats continued to live in Europe much more recently than scientists previously thought.

“When the first anatomically modern humans migrated to Europe, there may have been a saber-toothed cat waiting for them,” Paijmans says.

The finding raises new questions about how and why the saber-toothed cats went extinct. Paijmans says they are now interested in studying DNA from other samples of saber-toothed cats. Although it will be technically challenging, they also hope to recover and analyze DNA from much older Homotherium specimens.

This project received funding from the European Research Council, the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development, and demonstration and the Lundbeck Foundation.

Saber-toothed cats’ illnesses, new research


This video from the USA is about the La Brea Tar Pits and Natural History Museum and a saber-toothed cat.

From Science News in the USA:

Surgeon aims to diagnose deformities of extinct saber-toothed cats

By Lesley Evans Ogden

9:00am, October 13, 2017

Robert Klapper has examined scores of damaged and diseased human knees, hips and shoulders. But a visit to the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum introduced the orthopedic surgeon to the suffering of an extinct cat — and a scientific mystery. In 2000, Klapper took a break from his patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles to visit the nearby tar pits, where myriad mammals and other animals (SN: 5/17/14, p. 18) have been getting stuck for the last 40,000 years. (Yes, modern birds and insects still wander in).

After examining a museum display of broad-snouted dire wolf (Canis dirus) skulls, Klapper made a beeline for the security guard and asked to see a curator. He badgered then collections manager Chris Shaw with questions about why the skulls looked so perfect — no signs of cancers, fractures or arthritis.

“Instead of throwing me out,” Klapper says, Shaw took Klapper into the bowels of the museum and pulled out a drawer of bones from saber-toothed cats (Smilodon fatalis), one of the abundant prehistoric animals preserved in the pits about 14,000 years ago. Klapper noticed a pelvis with a surface that reminded him of a medieval mace: One hip socket was spiky with sharp edges, a telltale sign of arthritis. At the healthy hip socket, the bone was billiard ball smooth.

That kind of bone damage did not happen overnight. The arthritic animal had been disabled for years, Klapper estimated, perhaps even from birth. The surgeon asked a favor: “I’d love to get a CT scan.” Signing out the ancient cat’s pelvis, he says, was a thrill.

Paleontologists have long debated whether saber-toothed cats were solitary or social hunters. If this lame cat had been unable to hunt for years, which is what its traumatized hip bone indicated to Klapper, it could have survived only with help from other cats.

Klapper scanned that fossilized cat pelvis but left the images untouched for years, occupied with his hospital job and hosting ESPN Radio’s Weekend Warrior, a health and sports program. Now, collaborating with Emily Lindsey, a paleoecologist at La Brea, Klapper plans to use more sophisticated radiology techniques to diagnose the deformity and possibly deduce clues about the cat’s lifestyle.

It’s still early days for the revitalized project, Lindsey cautions, but “I’m really excited about it.” The museum houses some 2,000 fossils of saber-toothed cats, several of which the two plan to scan in the months ahead.