Lynx meets wolf in Poland, video


This video says about itself:

Rare encounter of wolf and lynx in nature

Watch the exceptional encounter between the highly threatened wolf and a family of lynx in Poland’s wild forests. See also here.

Both animals have bounced back from the brink of extinction in Europe thanks to strong protection under EU Nature laws, but they are still at risk. We are campaigning to ensure that Europe’s beauties of nature are effectively protected.

Learn more about WWF campaign here.

Rare marbled cats photographed in Borneo


This video says about itself:

Elusive Marbled Cat Filmed

November 21, 2011—The little-known marbled cat, whose tail is nearly the length of its body, was recently captured by a camera trap in Indonesia.

© 2011 National Geographic; video courtesy of Marten Slothouwer.

From LiveScience:

Elusive Marbled Cats Secretly Photographed in Borneo

by Laura Geggel, Staff Writer | March 23, 2016 05:39pm ET

A secret photo shoot deep in the forests of Malaysian Borneo is helping researchers determine just how many marbled cats — rare, tree-climbing felines — live in the region, according to a new study.

Marbled cats (Pardofelis marmorata) are extremely elusive creatures. To get a better idea of the cats’ stomping grounds, the researchers placed camera traps in eight forests and two palm oil plantations in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, they said.

After four months of secret, motion-triggered infrared photography, the researchers found that marbled cats are most numerous in the lowlands where the forest is undisturbed. However, they did find a few cats in selectively logged areas. [See Camera Trap Photos of the Elusive Marbled Cat]

“We show that marbled cats can still survive in logged forests,” said study lead researcher Andrew Hearn, a doctoral candidate at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. “This lends further weight to the argument that such disturbed forests are important to the conservation of biodiversity and should be preserved wherever possible.”

Little is known about the cats, which are named for their marble-patterned fur. They live in dense tropical forests, and are rarely seen, except for the odd camera-trap sighting. Perhaps that’s because the species is listed as “near threatened,” according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) red list, largely due to habitat loss and poaching.

In the new study, the researchers used the surreptitiously taken photos to identify individual cats and estimate the species’ population density and distribution. They found that the lowland Danum Valley Conservation Area had about 19.5 cats per 39 square miles (100 square kilometers). Tawau Hills Park had fewer — about seven cats per 39 square miles. The Tabin Wildlife Reserve, which was selectively logged from 1969 to 1989, had an estimated density of about 10 cats per 39 square miles.

These estimates provide “tentative evidence” that undisturbed, lowland hill forests have the highest densities of marbled cats, Hearn said. Other areas, including disturbed lowlands and undisturbed highlands, had lower densities of the cats, he said.

The camera traps didn’t record any marbled-cat sightings within the plantations, although one cat was spotted walking along the forest-plantation boundary, the researchers added. They also photographed cubs in the Tabin North, Tawau and Ulu Segama forests.

The results of this exhaustive study suggest that the marbled-cat population may be somewhat higher in northern Borneo than it is elsewhere, but more studies are needed to verify this, Hearn said. For instance, researchers could use camera traps in other places in which the cats are found in the Indomalayan ecorealm, a region extending from eastern India and Nepal to Yunnan province, China; and throughout mainland Southeast Asia to the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. [Photos: In Images: The Rare Bay Cat of Borneo]

But enforced regulations could increase the number of Borneo’s marbled cats even more. Although poaching is illegal, the researchers found used shotgun cartridges in seven of the eight forests. However, they didn’t come across any evidence that poachers are shooting marbled cats, the scientists wrote in the study.

Laws governing logging and forest conservation may also help preserve the population of marbled cats, Hearn said.

“We provide further evidence that logged forest may still be used by these cats, and should be preserved,” he said.

The study was published online today (March 23) in the journal PLOS ONE.

Editor’s Recommendations

Cougar saved from trap in Utah, USA


This 17 March 2016 video from the USA is called Two Utah Men Free An Angry Cougar From A Trap!

About this, another video from the USA says about itself:

8 March 2016

Rescuers free furious cougar from bobcat trap in Utah

Footage has been released showing a large cougar being released from a bobcat trap in the Pine Valley Mountains in Utah. Division of Wildlife Resources employee Mark Ekins took the footage after responding to a call…

By Ed Mazza from the USA on this:

The Terrifying Job Of Helping A Trapped, Angry Mountain Lion

The cougar was accidentally caught in a bobcat trap.

03/15/2016 04:13 am ET

How do you help a wounded animal that thinks you want to hurt it, and could tear you to shreds in a matter of seconds if it ever gets its paws on you?

Very, very carefully.

A heart-stopping video shows rescuers in Utah working to free a ticked-off mountain lion who got caught in a bobcat trap.

The rescue was captured on video by Division of Wildlife Resources conservation officer Mark Ekins, who told KSL that most cougars can escape bobcat traps on their own without injury.

But from time to time, this happens.

Ekins admitted he was nervous during the rescue effort, and said that’s a good thing.

“If I wasn’t nervous or started to lack respect for the power of that animal, it could potentially be very dangerous,” Ekins told the station. “I’m nervous and I’m extremely careful when doing it… I’ve probably only done three in my career that were as big as the one you saw. That was a really big one.”

Not only does the cougar look intimidating, it also lets out a few angry snarls that sound like something out of a horror movie. …

Ekins told KUTV that he and the other rescuer used catch poles to immobilize the cougar. He said they could also use tranquilizers, but the poles are “more humane and a lot safer.”

Once the cougar was held down, they put a blanket over it, released the trapped paw and stood back until the cat realized it was free to go. The mountain lion ran off with one of the catch poles still attached, but dropped it not too far away.

Ekins told KUTV that the big cat had a cut on its paw but was otherwise fine.

Although the incident happened in December, the video was only recently posted online.

Other sources, like Dutch daily Metro of 19 March 2016, claim the cougar was in a bear trap, not a bobcat trap.

Wildcat in Dutch Limburg, video


This 6 March 2016 video from the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

In February 2016, a wildcat was captured on film images in a forest between the Limburg rivers Geul and Gulp. This is the first observation in this area since 2006. A special recording of a special animal.

See also here.

Fox against cat, video


This 2 February 2016 video shows a red fox driving away a house cat from a meal in Russia.

See here.

Wildlife conservation victories and problems


This video says about itself:

8 March 2014

The Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a leopard subspecies native to the Primorye region of southeastern Russia and Jilin Province of northeast China, and is classified as Critically Endangered since 1996 by IUCN. Only 14–20 adults and 5–6 cubs were counted in a census in 2007, with a total of 19–26 Amur leopards extant in the wild.

Footage from BBC’s “Planet Earth”.

Music by Yo-yo Ma: “Desert Capriccio”.

From the Wildlife Conservation Society in the USA:

WCS has been in the conservation business for over a century – and we’ve found the key to rebuilding animal populations is to preserve what land they have left… and fiercely defend it on their behalf. Our approach works. We’ve helped dramatically rebuild wildlife populations around the world:

  • Tigers once again live freely in India’s Western Ghats Mountains – in large part because of a massive community effort. Villagers voluntarily moved away from tiger habitats, community members became vigilant conservationists, and the government cracked down on poachers. And now there are 300% more wild tigers than 25 years ago. Amazing.
  • Our work to protect elephants in their habitats is our best hope for saving elephants. Despite declining numbers across Africa, elephant populations are actually increasing in Uganda, thanks to crackdowns on poachers in Murchison Falls, Queen Elizabeth, and Kidepo Valley National Parks. Improved protection of these lands has created safe havens for elephants to live peacefully.
  • The most endangered big cat in the world has a newly protected home in Russia. WCS helped establish the Land of the Leopard National Park – preserving a critical 60% of the Amur leopard‘s habitat. The program has been so successful that there are plans to reintroduce the Amur leopard in the Far East Lazo region of Russia – where the leopards have been absent for decades.
  • The second most endangered turtle is back on the road to recovery in Myanmar. The Burmese Roofed Terrapin was thought to be extinct until a small population was found in the ponds of a pagoda. In 2007, we started an ambitious program to protect wild nests and hatch eggs in captivity. And earlier this year, we started releasing them back into their old habitat.

These are tremendous victories for animals and for people like you and me who deeply care about their future. But sadly, for every victory we celebrate, dozens of other threats to endangered animals loom.

Balkan lynx in danger


This 2015 video is called Wild Balkan: HD National Geographic Documentary.

From BirdLife:

Balkan Lynx added to the IUCN list as Critically Endangered

By Sanya Khetani-Shah, Tue, 24/11/2015 – 16:40

The IUCN Red List has added the Balkan Lynx to its Red List as a Critically Endangered subspecies of the Eurasian Lynx. This is a very real confirmation that the Balkan Lynx requires urgent and coordinated conservation actions in order to increase its population in the wild.

“In the past 10 years, through the Balkan Lynx Recovery Programme, we have collected enough data to assess the status of the lynx according to IUCN standards and we have realized that its status is Critically Endangered,” said Dime Melovski, MES (BirdLife in Macedonia) project manager, at a press conference in Skopje.

“We are saddened to acknowledge just how dire is its current condition. We hope that by being added to the Red List, the Balkan Lynx will become more visible and recognized as a species in need of very concrete conservation measures.”

The Balkan lynx is a subspecies of the Eurasian Lynx and its current population is estimated at 19 to 36 adult individuals. Its only confirmed breeding grounds are located within the Mavrovo National Park in Macedonia. Threats include hunting and illegal killing, decline of prey populations, and loss and fragmentation of habitat.

There are no Balkan Lynx in captivity and thus if its designation is uplisted from Critically Endangered, it will mean complete extinction.

The Balkan Lynx Recovery Programme is implemented by several civil society organizations and volunteers from the Balkan region (MES in Macedonia, CZIP in Montenegro, PPNEA in Albania, ERA and Finch in Kosovo) as well as organizations from Germany (EuroNatur), Switzerland (KORA) and Norway (NINA). The programme is funded by the Swiss Foundation MAVA.

The aim of the Balkan Lynx Recovery Programme is to secure the survival of the population through a series of protected areas and better management of protected areas along the borders of Albania and Macedonia, Albania and Montenegro as well as Albania, Macedonia and Kosovo. The protected areas will be established in areas where there are strongholds of the Balkan Lynx.

The programme was the catalyst for the proclamation of new national parks in Albania and Kosovo and our BirdLife partner in Macedonia is awaiting the proclamation of a new national park in Macedonia as well.

“Until a decade ago the lynx in Macedonia was almost a myth. Nobody knew much about it, but our cooperation with local stakeholders, especially hunters, opened the door to a very detailed study of this secretive animal, its status and its prey,” Melovski added. “Of course, our next step will be to downlist the lynx on the Red List. But that is no easy task, since it means increasing the current population of approximately 30 individuals to over 50.”

Until a decade ago the Balkan Lynx (a subspecies of the Eurasian Lynx) was virtually unknown to the local population and its sightings were almost mythical. This is not surprising: the subspecies’ current population is estimated at 19 to 36 adult individuals: here.

Lynx may be reintroduced to UK after 1,000 years following success of Spain programme: here.