Rare Amazon jungle dog video


This video says about itself:

See an Extremely Rare Jungle Dog | National Geographic

4 August 2017

One of the Amazon rain forest‘s most elusive inhabitants, the short-eared dog, has been caught on video in southeastern Peru.

About the size of a fox, these jungle canines are incredibly difficult to spot. In fact, a journey to the Amazon is far more likely to yield a jaguar sighting than a glimpse of a wild short-eared dog. In late May 2014, conservation biologist Lary Reeves set up a camera trap near a white-lipped peccary carcass. Wanting to record what he’d heard was a “king vulture fiesta” at the carcass, Reeves braved the rampaging insects and rancid stench to set the camera a few feet from the carcass.

Read more here.

Three small frog species discovered in Peru


This video says about itself:

7 March 2017

In the Pui Pui Protected Forest, Peruvian Andes, researchers discovered a new species of terrestrial-breeding frog. The species was named Pristimantis attenboroughi, Attenborough’s Rubber Frog, in honour of Sir David Attenborough.

And now, more relatives of this frog have been discovered in that area.

From the University of Michigan in the USA:

Three species of tiny frogs discovered in Peruvian Andes

July 27, 2017

A University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues have discovered three more frog species in the Peruvian Andes, raising to five the total number of new frog species the group has found in a remote protected forest since 2012.

The three newly found species live in the mountain forests and Andean grasslands of the Pui Pui Protected Forest in central Peru. They are described in a study to be published online July 27 in the journal Zootaxa. All three species measure an inch or less in length, from snout to vent.

“Our team has now described five new species of frogs from this region, with several more to come in the near future,” said Rudolf von May, a postdoctoral researcher in the Rabosky Lab at the U-M Museum of Zoology and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Other team members are in Illinois, the Czech Republic and Peru.

“These discoveries demonstrate the need for further scientific exploration of such Andean habitats,” he said. “While the Pui Pui Protected Forest was established in 1985, virtually no biological surveys were conducted in the park for nearly three decades, and the potential for additional discoveries is enormous.”

The three new frog species belong to the genus Pristimantis, the most diverse genus of frogs in the tropical Andes. With nearly 500 species, they are part of the family Craugastoridae, commonly known as land-breeding or terrestrial-breeding frogs.

While most frogs lay eggs in water, terrestrial-breeding frogs use a specialized reproductive mode called direct development: A clutch of embryos hatches directly into froglets; there are no free-living tadpoles. This allows the group to exploit a wide variety of habitats, as long as those locations contain sufficient moisture.

Terrestrial-breeding frogs appear to have undergone an evolutionary radiation at high elevations in Peru, as many species resemble one another and have similar life histories. A so-called adaptive radiation occurs when a single ancestral group produces many descendant species adapted to different habitats and ways of life.

The Zootaxa paper names and describes the three newly discovered frog species and presents supporting morphological and phylogenetic evidence. The first author of the paper is Edgar Lehr of Illinois Wesleyan University.

The frog species bear the name of the Pui Pui park, the mountain-forest habitat in the park, and a naturalist-explorer. They are:

The Pui Pui Rubber Frog, Pristimantis puipui, known from a single site near Laguna Sinchón, which marks the approximate center of the Pui Pui Protected Forest, at an elevation of 12,762 feet above sea level. The species name is derived from the Quechua words “pui pui” meaning “eyes of water,” a reference to the many lakes of the Pui Pui Protected Forest.

The Hill Dweller Rubber Frog, Pristimantis bounides, known from two sites at elevations of 10,991 feet and 11,362 feet. The species name “bounides” is derived from the Greek noun “bounos,” which means “dweller of the hills” and refers to the habitat of the mountain forests where this frog was found.

The Humboldt’s Rubber Frog, Pristimantis humboldti, known from a single site at 10,886 feet. The species name is the patronym of the German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt, who traveled the New World between 1799 and 1804 and whose ideas changed our understanding of the world.

Earlier this year, the researchers described two other new species of Peruvian frogs, Pristimantis ashaninka and Pristimantis attenboroughi. The first was named after the Ashaninka, a group of indigenous people from the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon, some of whom live near Pui Pui. The second species was named after BBC naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough.

Future papers by the group will describe five more newly discovered species from Pui Pui: three frogs and two lizards.

The Pui Pui Protected Forest covers 150,000 acres and includes dozens of lakes and streams that feed several rivers in the upper Amazon River watershed. About 70 percent of the protected forest is covered by Andean grasslands, and about 30 percent is cloud forest.

“Our findings suggest that the Pui Pui Protected Forest houses unique biological communities containing species found nowhere else,” Lehr said. “One reason for this is that the area has a steep topographic gradient including a broad array of habitats and local microclimates that contribute to high amphibian species diversity.”

Von May and Lehr first discussed the possibility of exploring the Pui Pui in 2003. In early 2012, Lehr received funding from the National Geographic Society to survey the area, and they carried out the first expeditions that year.

Two other herpetologists joined subsequent trips: Jiri Moravec of the National History Museum in Prague, Czech Republic and Juan Carlos Cusi of the Museum of Natural History of Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru.

Altogether, the team spent nearly three months in the field between 2012 and 2014, in a region where mountains taller than 13,000 feet are common.

“Our team worked with local guides and park rangers,” von May said. “The equipment, food and camping supplies used in the expeditions were carried by horses and mules.”

Most of the frogs were discovered by searching through moss and grass and under rocks, small bushes and other vegetation. In some cases, the researchers found frogs after hearing the males calling during light afternoon or evening rains.

Given that the newly discovered frog species live in the Pui Pui Protected Forest, much of their habitat is formally protected. However, amphibians worldwide face multiple threats — including habitat loss, the deadly chytrid skin fungus and climate change — and Andean amphibians are no exception.

In the Peruvian Andes, habitat loss is currently the main threat. Of special concern are forest clearcuttings and humanmade fires used to expand agricultural crops and grazing areas for livestock.

Worldwide, the number of known amphibian species continues to rise due to new discoveries and now stands at nearly 7,700.

Young hummingbirds fledge, video


This video says about itself:

Both Green-and-white Hummingbird nestlings fledged on New Year’s Day, 2017, from their nest next to the Andean Bear Rescue Center at Machu Picchu Inkaterra.

The Green-and-white Hummingbird cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Inkaterra Asociación. Very little has been published about this small species of hummingbird endemic to the eastern Andean slopes of central Peru.

Young hummingbirds test their wings


This video from Peru says about itself:

Intense Flapping at the Green-and-white Hummingbird Nest, 31 Dec 2016

One of the nestlings nearly takes off while practicing flying on the edge of the nest.

The Green-and-white Hummingbird cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Inkaterra Asociación. Very little has been published about this small species of hummingbird endemic to the eastern Andean slopes of central Peru.

Watch live anytime here.

Green-and-white Hummingbirds are locally common through their range and inhabit the canopy of humid forests, forest borders, clearings, and second growth. Its breeding biology is thought to be similar to other Amazilia hummingbirds, with an incubation period of 15-16 days followed by fledging at 18-22 days. Only the female adult cares for the nestlings, and she feeds them a steady diet of insects and nectar gathered from nearby the nest site.

Unfortunately, rates of nest predation for open-cup nesters in the tropics are very high—only around 18% survive to fledge. Eggs hatched around December 3 or 4 …

The cam situated on the expansive grounds of the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in Aguas Calientes, Peru, near Machu Picchu.

Hummingbird nestlings in Peru, video


This video says about itself:

Green-and-white Hummingbird Feeds Growing Nestlings – Dec. 14, 2016

The Green-and-white Hummingbird cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Inkaterra Asociación. Very little has been published about this small species of hummingbird endemic to the eastern Andean slopes of central Peru.

Watch live anytime here.

Green-and-white Hummingbirds are locally common through their range and inhabit the canopy of humid forests, forest borders, clearings, and second growth. Its breeding biology is thought to be similar to other Amazilia hummingbirds, with an incubation period of 15-16 days followed by fledging at 18-22 days. Only the female adult cares for the nestlings, and she feeds them a steady diet of insects and nectar gathered from nearby the nest site.

Unfortunately, rates of nest predation for open-cup nesters in the tropics are very high—only around 18% survive to fledge. Eggs hatched around December 3 or 4, and if the chicks make it, they should fledge around 22-25 December, 2016.

The cam situated on the expansive grounds of the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in Aguas Calientes, Peru, near Machu Picchu. The hotel sits on 12 acres of protected cloud forest where 214 species of birds – including such rarities as the Golden-headed Quetzal and the Andean Cock-of-the-rock – have been seen. In addition to the avifauna, the hotel hosts the world’s largest native orchid collection (372 species) and the Andean Bear Rescue Center, where 5 endangered Andean Bears are being rehabilitated following bouts in captivity.

The hummingbird nest is near the Rescue Center, and from time to time you may see a bear walking by in the background. The “tick”-ing that you hear on the audio is the sound of the electric fence surrounding the Rescue Center.

Inkaterra Asociación is a non-profit institution that started research in 1978 to promote the conservation of Peru’s biodiversity and cultural resources. Committed to sustainable development, its core objectives are the encouragement of scientific research and the promotion of responsible business models to benefit local communities.

Determined to improve the quality of life for every living being, ITA has been able to protect over 15,000 hectares of Amazon rainforest in the low basin of Madre de Dios river (capturing 3,400,000 tons of carbon emissions), as well as ecosystems in Cuzco’s cloud forests. These activities are supported by partnerships with National Geographic Society, Global Environment Facility (United Nations), Conservation International, … International Game Fish Association, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and other influential organizations.

As intended by the founder of Inkaterra Hotels, José Koechlin von Stein, ITA’s research program is self-funded through its ecotourism activities, which have provided 21 new species for science among orchids, amphibians, insects and liana. An Andean (Spectacled) Bear conservation program in Machu Picchu; bird and orchid studies; and a marine reserve at Cabo Blanco (Northern Peru) stand out among ITA’s current projects.