‘Stop Japanese militarist war flags at Olympics’


This 6 September 2019 video from South Korea says about itself:

The International Olympic Committee has said recently that it does not plan to stop Japanese fans next year at the Games in Tokyo from flying the so-called Rising Sun flag, a symbol highly offensive to people throughout Asia whose countries suffered under Japanese imperialism.

The IOC, so far, has said simply that the Olympics should be free of political statements, and that the flag itself is not inherently political.

Our Kim Bo-kyung takes a closer look at the issue.

To people in China, Korea and other countries in Asia, the Rising Sun flag was the symbol of the Japanese Empire as it took over their countries in whole or part in the early 20th century.

According to Alexis Dudden, a historian in the University of Conneticut, it is both unnecessary and unfortunate to see this flag still used by Japan’s self-defense forces, some sports fans and right-wing political groups.

She compared the use of the Rising Sun to the Confederate flag in the U.S., flown by the South in the American Civil War.

Like the Rising Sun, she said, the Confederate flag is now discredited not only because that side lost the war, but also because it causes deep pain and suffering to descendants of the victimized.

In her opinion, the IOC should reconsider allowing the Rising Sun flag next summer in Tokyo.

“It really is important IOC learns why this hurts so much. I mean, imagine this Los Angeles stadium Olympics full of American confederacy flags. That would be terrible.”

In fact, the design Japan has chosen for next year’s medals at the Paralympics feature elements that strongly resemble the Rising Sun, which Professor Dudden thinks is intentional.

“I find it deeply unfortunate that the Paralympics medals will have the Rising Sun flag on the medals that is displaying right now. I think that is a specific political act and it is up to IOC to recognize that there really is historical distinctions going on here.”

To settle the issue, she said it’s important to have an international conversation to educate people on how much suffering this flag still causes.

Along with that, she said she hopes the South Korean government can navigate the challenges Japan keeps putting in its way, and she urged the South Korean athletes who’ll be competing in Tokyo to rise above any provocations they encounter there.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

South Korea has urged the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to ban the ‘Flag of the Rising Sun’ around next year’s Games in Tokyo. The country expressed great concern about Japan’s plans to allow the flag in the stadiums.

South Korea finds the impact of the flag similar to what Nazi expressions are for Europeans, and calls it a symbol of Japanese aggression during the war in the first part of the last century.

The flag, with a sun in the middle and sixteen rays around it, has been the official war flag of the Japanese armed forces.

“The flag is a direct violation of the Olympic spirit, which promotes world peace and love for humanity,” writes the Asian peninsula country, which was occupied by Japan from 1910 to 1945.

Flag forbidden in football

The same discussion about whether or not to allow the flag took place earlier in football matches, after which FIFA decided to ban the flag in stadiums.

The IOC has only confirmed that the request from South Korea has been received in good order.

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Fukushima disaster and Japan Olympics


This 28 July 2019 video says about itself:

Fukushima 2020 Olympics Nightmare: Is Prime Minister Abe Criminally Insane?

This 2019 documentary looks at the plans of Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to bring the Olympic baseball games and Paralympics to Fukushimaduring the 2020 July August Japan Olympic games. It interviews experts, community activists and trade unionists about the reality of Fukushima and the massive propaganda campaign to cover-up the continuing dangers and crisis.

PM Abe told the International Olympics Committee that Fukushima had been “decontaminated” but there is over 1 million tons of tritium radiocative water in over. 1,000 tanks surrounding the broken nuclear reactors, the melted nuclear rods still remain in the reactors and there are 9 million bags of contaminated radioactive material spread throughout the prefecture. The Abe government and its IOC representatives have also been involved in corruption through bribery of IOC delegates to vote for having the Olympics in Japan.

This documentary hears from people in Japan about the reality of having the 2020 Olympics in Japan and Fukushima.

Japanese cyberspace minister knows nothing about computers


This 15 November 2018 video says about itself:

A Japanese minister in charge of cyber security has provoked astonishment by admitting he has never used a computer in his professional life, and appearing confused by the concept of a USB drive.

Yoshitaka Sakurada, 68, is the deputy chief of the government’s cyber security strategy office and also the minister in charge of the Olympic and Paralympic Games that Tokyo will host in 2020.

In parliament on Wednesday however, he admitted he doesn’t use computers. “Since the age of 25, I have instructed my employees and secretaries, so I don’t use computers myself”, he said in a response to an opposition question in a lower house session, local media reported.

He also appeared confused by the question when asked about whether USB drives were in use at Japanese nuclear facilities. His comments were met with incredulity by opposition lawmakers.

“It’s unbelievable that someone who has not touched computers is responsible for cyber security policies”, said opposition lawmaker Masato Imai.

And his comments provoked a firestorm online. “Doesn’t he feel ashamed?” wrote one Twitter user. “Today any company president uses a PC. He doesn’t even know what a USB is. Holy cow.”

Another joked that perhaps Sakurada was simply engaged in his own kind of cyber security. “If a hacker targets this Minister Sakurada, they wouldn’t be able to steal any information. Indeed it might be the strongest kind of security!”

Sakurada has been in office just over a month, after being appointed in a cabinet reshuffle following Prime Minister Shinzo Abe‘s reelection as head of his political party. But he has already come fire for other gaffes in parliament including garbling an opposition lawmaker’s name and repeatedly stating “I don’t know the details” when questioned about his new Olympic brief.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Japanese cyber minister knows nothing about computers

The Japanese internet security minister is under attack because he knows nothing about computers. Minister Yoshitaka Sakurada (68) has admitted that he has never used a computer.

Sakurada was installed a month ago. In parliament he received questions about malware (malicious software) and what a USB port is for. When the minister said that such a port was practically never used, the MPs began to laugh incredulously. The interrogation was directly visible on Japanese TV.

Mr Sakurada is in the right-wing government of Prime Minister Abe. To become a minister in that government, you don’t have to know anything about anything. You just have to be right-wing. Eg, Mr Sakurada said that World War II comfort women [women forced into prostitution] were “professional prostitutes. That’s business.”

Mr Sakurada is in a government which does not know, or pretends not to know, that militarism is wrong; that the Japanese regime in World War II practiced forced prostitution and other crimes; that nuclear plants are dangerous; that Fukushima food is hazardous to eat; etc.

I guess that the only thing that Mr Sakurada does know about computers is that his job is to, like in the USA, France, Germany etc., censor pro-peace leftist Internet sites.

First Dominican speed skater to Winter Olympics?


This 8 October 2018 video shows Manuel Leito, a speed skater born in the Dominican Republic, now living in the Netherlands, at a 500 meter race in Thialf stadium in Heerenveen.

Today, Dutch NOS TV reports on Manuel Leito.

Manuel Leito wants to become the first ever Dominican participant in winter Olympics, at the 2022 Beijing games.

Leito started speed skating when he was almost 30 years old, his third season has only started now.

Leito is trying to learn a lot to catch up with other speed skaters who started much earlier. During his first year as skater, his 500 meter was in 40,41 seconds. Now his personal best is 38:56. To qualify for the World Cup, he needs a time below 38 seconds.

First Dutch outdoor speed skating marathon, Haaksbergen tomorrow


This video is about the speed skating women, during the first outdoor marathon race of 2016, in Haaksbergen in the Netherlands.

23-year old Irene Schouten, the Dutch champion on indoor ice, won the race, as it snowed.

Irene Schouten wins in Haaksbergen, ANP photo

Later, the men’s race started.

This year, the first Dutch speed skating marathon will again be on the Haaksbergen rink in Overijssel province. Tomorrow, 28 February 2018.

A few days ago, Ms Schouten won a bronze medal at the speed skating mass start in the Winter Olympics in Korea.

See this 24 February 2018 video.

And this December 2017 one.

Winter Olympics in Korea, music


This 11 February 2018 video shows Kleintje Pils playing at the Winter Olympics in Korea, at the 5,000 meter men speed skating event.

In 2014 at the Sochi, Russia games, they played YMCA.

This 6 February 2018 video from the Netherlands says about itself:

The Dutch mopping orchestra called “Kleintje Pils” (Little Beer) is invited to play at the 2018 winter olympics in PyeongChang, Korea. So they rehearse the [Korean] song “Gangnam Style” in Sassenheim, Holland.

Olympic speed skating and Donald Trump


Dutch speed skating fans' on Donald Trump

Today, the speed skating races of the Winter Olympics in Korea started. The Dutch fans on this photo were at the first race: 3000 meter for women.

In that match, all three medals, gold, silver and bronze went to Dutch skaters.

The fans had predicted that well on their banner. The sign jokes about United States President Trump‘s ‘America First policy‘.

Sometimes, sports authorities ban political allusions by spectators. Good that that did not happen with this banner in Korea.

This is a Dutch video with speed skater Carlyn Achtereekte; of 8 February 2018, two days before she became the surprising gold medal winner.

This video is about today, about Ms Achtereekte winning gold, and her two Dutch team mates silver and bronze.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Trump, Pence Rain on Koreas’ Olympic Unity Parade

9 February 2018

In a show of unity, athletes from North and South Korea marched at the Winter Olympics‘ Opening Ceremony under the same flag. But the Trump administration is doing its best to thwart hopes for peace on the peninsula, says Christine Ahn of Women Cross DMZ.