Great horned owl news from the USA

This video from California in the USA is called From Hatching to Release: the story of an orphaned Great Horned Owl.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Savannah Owls on the Horizon

Last year’s surprise season with a pair of Great Horned Owls in Savannah, Georgia, captured the imagination of hundreds of thousands of viewers worldwide. In their first year of nesting on cam they successfully fledged two owlets from an abandoned eagle nest near the top of a dying loblolly pine (watch highlights). No one knows whether the owls will return and nest this year, but our partners at Skidaway Audubon have reported seeing the adults courting and making alterations to the nest.

In hopeful anticipation of the owls’ nesting again, we have activated all of the camera equipment added and a second camera for a wide, fixed view of the nest from the west. The cams are streaming live, and it may still be a couple months before the owls begin nesting in earnest (last year’s pair laid their first egg on January 1). Tune in and you may be lucky enough to be greeted by hoots in the distance, or even a pair of wide eyes staring back at you! Watch cam.

Colourful cephalopods, video

This video from the USA says about itself:

Science Today: Colorful Cephalopods | California Academy of Sciences

1 June 2015

Learn how and why octopus, squid, and cuttlefish change colors.

African American teenager arrested by nine California police officers for jaywalking

This video from the USA says about itself:

8 September 2015

Nine police officers arrest an unarmed black teenager in California for allegedly trespassing in a bus-only lane … in Stockton, California. YouTube user Edward Avendaño posted the video and said in a Facebook post that the officer tried to stop the teenager, who kept walking to his bus. The teen was held in custody and released to his mother pending a charge in juvenile court of resisting arrest and trespassing.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Black teenager arrested by nine California police officers after ‘jaywalking’

Video shows unarmed teenager forced to ground by group of Stockton police officers after allegedly walking in a bus lane

Nine police officers arrested an unarmed black teenager in California after he allegedly jaywalked and then scuffled with an officer.

A video of the incident shows the officers surrounding the 16-year-old African American and forcing him to the ground after he got into an altercation with an officer who accused him of walking in a bus-only lane.

The incident happened in the city of Stockton, 80 miles (130km) east of San Francisco, on Wednesday morning. A cellphone video uploaded to Facebook and YouTube by a passerby has been viewed more than 10,000 times.

It shows an officer using his baton to push and hold the boy, wearing shorts, on a landscaped perimeter on the sidewalk.

They scuffle, the boy yelling “get the fuck off me” and the officer shouting “stop resisting arrest”. The officer strikes him in the face and orders him to the ground but the boy does not comply.

An unseen female bystander shouts in protest: “That’s a fucking kid! Don’t touch him, leave him alone! That’s a kid. Are you serious? He didn’t do nothing wrong.”

The officer retrieves from the ground what appears to be a body camera knocked off during the scuffle.

Several patrol cars arrive and four officers force the boy to the ground, handcuff him and march him to a car while colleagues mill around them. The protester’s voice rises in anger and disbelief: “That is a child! That is child that was jaywalking! That’s a fucking child! What’s wrong with y’all?”

YouTube user Edward Avendaño posted the video under the username Stockton Port City. In a Facebook post he said the officer tried to stop the teenager for jaywalking and ordered him to sit but the teen kept walking to his bus.

“The cop kept grabbing his arm & the kid took the cop’s hand off his arm so the cop took out his baton & that’s when I started recording because everything happened too quick. He didn’t have to hit the kid with the baton & no need to call about 20 cops.”

This, by the way, is not the first time that some police officer gets hysterical about the horrible crime of jaywalking; as this Spanish British history professor, attending a congress in the USA, can tell.

I must confess something. I have committed the heinous crime of jaywalking myself. When? In the 1980s. Where? In Prague; today in the Czech republic, then in Czechoslovakia.

If police react so violently to jaywalking in the USA, ‘the land of the free’, just imagine what would happen in then communist party-ruled Czechoslovakia. Ronald Reagan, then president of ‘the land of the free’ used to call these East European states ‘the evil empire’.

A Czech policeman saw me jaywalking. Did he kill me? Did he send me to a concentration camp?

The policeman said: ‘You should cross the street this way. Not that way’. And that was it.

Maybe police in California might learn from that, thirty years later?

Indeed, some things were very seriously wrong in 1980s Czechoslovakia. I was in Prague then as a guest of people who had been sacked for being political dissidents. However, establishment politicians and corporate media in NATO countries depicted real wrongs plus invented wrongs in eastern Europe as a contrasting background for their claims of how free western countries supposedly were.

Basking shark off California, USA

This video from the USA says about itself:

On May 5, 2012 our whale watching boat, Manute’a, encountered a rare Basking Shark off the coast of Dana Point. The animal was estimated to be about 20 feet long. These plankton eating sharks are the second largest fish in the world; only a whale shark is bigger. Whale watchers were awestruck when this huge shark turned and swam right up next to the boat!

California condor nest webcam on the Internet

This video from California in the USA says about itself:

Male Condor #509 Visits Delivers Meal to Chick, August 21, 2015

24 August 2015

The male condor returned for an extended period, repeatedly feeding the youngster and resting for a while before leaving.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA writes about this:

August 26, 2015

Live From a California Condor Nest!

Our newest cam focuses on one of the most iconic and hard-to-observe species in North America: the California Condor. The cliffside nest cavity on camera in the Sespe Condor Sanctuary is home to a 5-month old condor (wing tagged #93), who is the offspring of a 21-year old female (#111) and a 6-year old male (#509). Learn more about the condors on cam.

This live stream is the product of a long-term collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Santa Barbara Zoo, and the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology.

In 1982, only 22 California Condors survived world-wide. By spring of 1987, all remaining wild condors had been placed in captivity, thus beginning an intensive recovery effort among government agencies, zoos and other conservation groups to save the California Condor from extinction. In 1992, the Service began reintroducing captive-bred condors into the wild and with the help of public and private partners the total population has grown to approximately 430 birds, with more than half of the population flying free. Learn more about condor conservation.

This year, the California Condor Recovery Program celebrated a milestone in endangered species recovery with a record 19 wild condor nests in California. Biologists with the Service began using cams to remotely monitor the nests of condors in 2010, and this year we were able to help bring the live view to Bird Cams viewers everywhere.

The Condor Cam runs from dawn to dusk, and you can expect to see the growing condor chick stretch its wings and feet in unique yoga-like poses and interact energetically with its attentive parents during their nest visits … Off-camera, the persistent calls of Acorn Woodpeckers, Stellar’s [sic: Steller’s] Jays, and Common Ravens provide the auditory backdrop that helps make you feel like you’ve got your own cliffside seat.

Condor chicks can be very curious, and we’re excited to share their little-known world with you. We’ll be posting updates on the Condor Cam twitter feed and the Bird Cams Facebook page so you don’t miss anything important. Thanks for watching!

Wolves back in California after almost a century

This video from the USA says about itself:

20 August 2015

Wildlife officials in California say they have photographic evidence of the first gray wolf pack in the state in nearly a century. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife captured images of two black-furred gray wolf adults and five pups in northern California. Other than a lone wolf spotted in 2011, official say the so-called Shasta Pack are the first confirmed wolves in the state since 1924. Trail cameras recorded individual images of the two adults, as well as one photo of the pups, which appear to be a few months old. Wolves used to be seen regularly in California, but they are now considered endangered by both the state and federal government.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

First wolf pack found in California in nearly a century

Fears hunters may kill newly discovered canine group

Siobhan Fenton

Friday 21 August 2015

A wolf pack has been spotted in California for the first time in nearly a century.

Two adults and five pups have been confirmed in southeastern Siskiyou County. Local ranchers tending to their herds told authorities they had spotted the animals.

State and federal authorities subsequently confirmed the sightings after a remote camera captured photos of the pack.

Read more:

Stuffed Arctic wolf worth £32,000 stolen in London
Litter of wolf pups ‘first’ of its kind to be born in UK

The state’s grey wolf population became extinct in 1924. They were named the Shasta pack, after the nearby Mount Shasta.

Karen Kovacs, from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, said she was stunned by the news of the wolves’ return. She believes they have most likely migrated from Oregon’s north-eastern corner.

It is hoped DNA tests might be able to give a more accurate understanding of the animals’ backgrounds.

The canines are protected by federal and state endangered species legislation but Amaroq Weiss, from the Centre for Biological Diversity, said local conservationists are concerned the wolves could still fall victim to hunters as hunting season gets underway in the area.

See also here.