Lorikeets, originally from New Guinea?


This video from Australia says about itself:

Lorikeet Feeding Frenzy

22 November 2012

The feeding of the Rainbow Lorikeets at Bungalow Bay Koala Village which is on the North-east side of Magnetic island, just off the coast of Townsville, Queensland.

From Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Volume 90, September 2015, Pages 34–48:

Molecular phylogenetics suggests a New Guinean origin and frequent episodes of founder-event speciation in the nectarivorous lories and lorikeets (Aves: Psittaciformes)

Highlights

We report the first DNA sequence-based phylogeny of parrots known as lories and lorikeets.

The group is inferred to have originated within the last 10 million years in New Guinea.

Dispersal and founder-event speciation have been important in their diversification.

Dispersal appears to have been primarily ‘downstream’ from New Guinea and Australia.

Some genus level changes to the group’s systematics are recommended.

Abstract

The lories and lorikeets (Aves: Loriinae: Loriini) are a readily recognizable, discrete group of nectarivorous parrots confined to the Indo-Pacific region between Wallace’s Line and the Pitcairn Island group in the central-east Pacific Ocean. We present the first phylogenetic analysis of all currently recognized genera in the group using two mitochondrial and five nuclear loci.

Our analyses suggest a New Guinean origin for the group at about 10 million years ago (95% HPD 4.8–14.8) but this origin must be interpreted within the context of that island’s complicated, recent geological history. That is, the origin and early diversification of the group may have taken place as New Guinea’s Central Cordillera arose and the final constituent terranes that form present-day New Guinea were accreted. The latter activity may have promoted dispersal as a key element in the group’s history.

We have detected several instances of dispersal out of New Guinea that we argue constitute instances of founder-event speciation. Some phenotypically cohesive genera are affirmed as monophyletic but other genera are clearly in need of taxonomic dismantlement and reclassification. We recognize Parvipsitta Mathews, 1916 for two species usually placed in Glossopsitta and we advocate transfer of Chalcopsitta cardinalis into Pseudeos Peters, 1935. Other non-monophyletic genera such as Charmosyna, Psitteuteles and, probably, Trichoglossus, require improved taxon sampling and further phylogenetic analysis before their systematics can be resolved. Cursory examination of trait mapping across the group suggests that many traits are ancestral and of little use in determining genus-level systematics.

Lorikeet and lori family tree, according to new research

Rose-ringed parakeets preparing to sleep


This video, by Luuk Punt from the Netherlands, is about rose-ringed parakeets, also called ring-necked parakeets, Psittacula krameri, gathering in trees in Leiderdorp, the Netherlands, to sleep, on 23 October 2011.

Recently, big groups of rose-ringed parakeets started sleeping in Leiderdorp. They sleep in a part of the town called Vogelbuurt, where streets have birds’ names.

This Leiderdorp parakeet video is the sequel to the first one.

Australian night parrot killed by feral cat


This video from Australia says about itself:

3 July 2013

Thought to be extinct: Queensland bird enthusiast presents first photos of the elusive night parrot.

From the Birds Alive Newsletter, March 2015:

Feral cats versus Night Parrots

The latest twist in the rather secret story of the Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) is that a cat-killed individual has been found in an area of arid spinifex country SW of Winton, in W Queensland, close to where John Young photographed the species for the first time in May 2013.

Apparently, according to Queensland government sources, professional marksmen have been employed by a private conservation company to patrol the area at night with spotlights, shooting feral cats (Felis catus) on sight. The programme is funded by mining company Fortescue Metals, whose involvement dates back to the reported discovery of Night Parrots in a mineral exploration area in Western Australia in 2005. However, government agencies have been kept in the dark concerning the whereabouts of Night Parrots in Queensland, and the sites where the species occur are on a privately leased grazing property.

Feral cats have long been implicated in the decline of this once widespread species: in 1892, it was reported that ‘numerous’ parrots were killed by cats near Alice Springs. Some observers have noted increases in feral cat populations in recent years in parts of inland Australia. The region around Winton where the parrots occur has been drought-afflicted for several years.

Endangered Puerto Rican parrots released into the wild


This video says about itself:

19 March 2014

Get to know the Puerto Rican Parrot with Mr. Wizard.

From La Prensa in Puerto Rico:

15 Endangered Puerto Rican parrots released into the wild

22 January 2015

San Juan, Jan 22 (EFE). Fifteen Puerto Rican parrots were released into the wild to strengthen the critically endangered species, the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, or DRNA, said.

The release of the birds, also known as Puerto Rican amazons, in the Rio Abajo State Forest “is a crucial step in the program to restore this species,” DRNA Secretary Carmen Guerrero said.

“Each time we release birds, with the intention of increasing the number of parrots living in the wild, we advance step by step toward a not-so-distant future when the bird the Tainos (Puerto Rico‘s early inhabitants) called the iguaca may be taken off the list of species in danger of extinction,” she said.

The DRNA is in the process of preparing an additional 200 Puerto Rican to be released into the wild.

The most recent census found the number or Puerto Rican parrots living free in the Rio Abajo State Forest ranges between 50 and 100, with another group in the El Yunque National Park on the island’s northeastern coast.

The program to restore the species is led by DRNA, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the United States Forest Service.

Birds being trained for life in the wild must spend at least one year in cages large enough to allow flight. They are fed with fruits they will find in the wilderness and taught to recognize their natural predators.

Two Puerto Rican parrots were born in the wild last year in the Rio Abajo, an landmark achievement for the program.

Authorities estimate that Puerto Rico was home to more than 1 million Puerto Rican parrots in the 19th century. By the 1950s, their numbers had fallen to barely 200.

In 1968, the species was included in the U.S. federal endangered species list and the restoration program began in 1973 with a first center in El Yunque for reproduction in captivity.

A second center for reproduction in captivity was established in Rio Abajo in 1993.

The first release of a batch of Puerto Rican parrots took place in 2000 in El Yunque, followed in 2006 by a release in Rio Abajo.

Ring-necked parakeets in Rotterdam, video


This video is about ring-necked parakeets in Rotterdam city in the Netherlands.

Stefan Timmermans made the video.

Parakeet, jackdaws, wood pigeon feeding in garden


This video is about an escapee Australian ringneck parakeet, jackdaws, and a wood pigeon feeding in a garden.

C. van Leeuwen from the Netherlands made this video.