British corporate media promote racism

This video from Britain says about itself:

The Sun Newspaper Is Racist With Rupert Murdoch At The Helm

12 August 2016

A break down of everything Murdoch owns and the front page of the worst rag in Britain.

From lies and cover ups about the Hillsborough disaster to forcing racist articles down your throat on a daily basis with no substance and very little thought.

Boycott the Sun.

Music ‘A piece for two fingers’ by Kevin Mcleod.

Additional narrative content James O Brien LBC Radio.

By Ben Cowles in Britain:

Brands vulnerable to media exposure

Friday 14th October 2016

Ben Cowles discusses the Stop Funding Hate social media campaign with its founder RICHARD WILSON

“DRIP by drip our society is being poisoned with headlines selling hatred,” begins a video by Stop Funding Hate. “Right now the press use fear and division to sell more papers and they don’t care what we think because hate pays.”

Stop Funding Hate is a social media-based grassroots campaign aiming to deter companies like Virgin, Waitrose and Specsavers from inadvertently funding racism by paying for advertisement space in the Daily Mail, Daily Express and the Sun. The hope is that the advertisers will see that the hate speech presented in these papers is damaging to society and that they will pull their ads from those publications.

Intrigued by the campaign, I got in touch with Richard Wilson, the campaign’s co-founder, and posed the following questions.

What motivated you to start Stop Funding Hate?

Katie Hopkins’s article in the Sun last year comparing migrants to “cockroaches” was a real wake-up call for me. I’ve met survivors of the Rwandan genocide and have friends from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where similar language was used to incite ethnic killings. I was seeing comments from Congolese friends on Facebook horrified to see this dehumanising language in the UK — a country that they had taken to be safe and stable.

Then the UN put out a statement pointing out that the Sun was using the language of genocide, warning that “history has shown us time and again the dangers of demonising foreigners and minorities […] It is extraordinary and deeply shameful to see these types of tactics being used […] simply because racism and xenophobia are so easy to arouse in order to win votes or sell newspapers.”

Research by Liz Gerard has shown that the anti-migrant coverage has actually been intensifying, with the Daily Express and Daily Mail in particular running an increasing number of anti-migrant front pages each year. At the same time community tensions are rising and there are growing divisions in our society. I’m personally quite worried about what will happen if things continue in this direction.

So far, you have aimed the campaign at Virgin, Specsavers and Waitrose. Why have you chosen these companies specifically?

Virgin and Waitrose are companies known for a particular set of values, which many people would say are fundamentally at odds with advertising in newspapers like the Sun, Mail and Express. Specsavers are clearly also a well-loved company, about which people have a lot of positive feelings. Again their association with these very aggressive and divisive newspapers just doesn’t sit right.

Specsavers issued a response after members of the Facebook community expressed their displeasure at one of their advertisements and threatened to boycott the company. How do you feel about the company’s response?

We were amazed by the scale of the public response to the Specsavers ad. We hadn’t originally identified them as a key company to engage with. But when we saw that they had an advert next to an anti-migrant front page headline in the Daily Express, we put a couple of things on social media that a lot of people picked up.

We think it’s commendable that Specsavers have responded to public concern over this issue rather than ignoring it. We know that this idea of “ethical advertising” is a new and emerging one, but we hope that Specsavers and other companies will start to factor it into their future marketing plans.

It’s a sad reality that migrant-bashing sells papers. The Sun, Mail and Express are more interested in profit than genuine reportage. But though we may completely disagree with what they say, they can exercise the freedom of expression (as long as it’s not hate speech, of course). Do you think what they print is hate speech?

The UN has stated unequivocally that elements of the British media are engaging in hate speech — and they’ve called on the government to do more to tackle it.

We are fully committed to freedom of expression, not just for newspapers but also for the customers of companies like Virgin, Waitrose and Specsavers who may want to express a view on these companies’ association with the anti-migrant press. We recognise that there are good reasons for treading carefully in the area of government regulation so the UN is actually going further than what we are calling for.

Our campaign is also about freedom of choice. The overwhelming majority of people in the UK don’t buy — and might never buy — the Sun, Daily Mail or Daily Express. Yet it’s currently very difficult to avoid shopping with one company or another that advertises in these newspapers.

Freedom of expression also means that the public has the right to question, criticise and challenge big media outlets like the Sun, Mail and Express. Yet the aggressive behaviour of the press can mute or even silence such criticism.

Obviously the Mail, Express and Sun are the most shameless offenders when it comes to migrant bashing. But the Telegraph and the [Murdoch-owned] Times generally also portray migrants in an unfavourable light. Will you focus on them also?

This is a campaign that focuses very specifically on the most extreme cases. We don’t take sides in political debates. This is not about whether people like or dislike a particular newspaper, but rather whether that newspaper is engaging in activities that are causing significant social harm. In this respect the evidence we’ve seen suggests that the Daily Mail, Express and Sun are in a category all of their own.

Of course companies care about the way people (especially their target market) perceive their brand, but if we really want them to change, wouldn’t we have to affect their bottom lines? Is this type of thing what you’re hoping to achieve or is media attention enough?

I think ultimately brand perception does affect the bottom line, otherwise companies wouldn’t invest so much in it.

Alongside that, supporters of the campaign are already making their own individual choices over whether to continue shopping with the companies we are engaging with.

We aren’t telling people what they should or shouldn’t do — and I don’t think we need to, as everyone’s individual circumstances are different. But if enough people get involved in the campaign, we do think it could have a significant impact on the bottom line, alongside those less tangible things like brand perception.

Some might describe campaigns such as yours as mere clicktivism. How would you respond to that? Though social media has great power to rally voices around a cause, does Stop Funding Hate have the momentum to keep going?

I wouldn’t make such a big distinction between online and offline campaigning. Whether it’s a Facebook page, a phone call, or a letter, these are just tools that can be used, more or less effectively, to communicate and organise. The key thing is how well you use those tools.

Whether or not our own campaign succeeds, we think it’s likely that this issue — and the public concern surrounding it — will not go away until we see a significant improvement in the way that the British press behaves towards migrants and other demonised groups.

How do you see things moving forward for the campaign?

We are currently working on a major new campaign focusing on one of the UK’s leading ethical brands, with a new video that we hope to release very soon. We’ve also got some big plans for the Christmas period, which is obviously the “peak” advertising season for many companies.

The campaign keeps on growing and gaining new supporters — from faith groups and academic experts to people who work within the media and are horrified by the way things have been going. Our biggest challenge is staying on top of all of the excellent ideas and offers of help that keep coming in.

Ben Cowles is the deputy features editor for the Morning Star. His twitter handle is @Cowlesz

If you wish to support or contribute to the Stop Funding Hate campaign then you can find their Facebook page here or sign the petition here.

Hungarian regime censors newspaper for corruption revelations

Hungarians demonstrate against corruption by the Orban government

When media in Turkey expose corruption by the family of President Erdogan, the Erdogan regime reacts with police violence and censorship to these revelations (and to revelations about links between the Turkish government and ISIS terrorism).

When media expose the regime of the ‘Erdogan’ of Hungary, Viktor Orban, Mr Orban likewise reacts with censorship.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Critical Hungarian newspaper closed down after stories about corruption

8 October 2016, 20:25

The biggest left-political newspaper of Hungary is not published anymore. Journalists and opposition talk of a coup, and suspect that the regime of President Orban is behind it.

The owners of the newspaper (Nepszabadsag) say that financial losses forced them to take this decision, but that is strongly doubted. The end of publication follows on a number of critical articles about corruption.

Journalists say they were completely surprised by the closure. “Our first thought was about a coup. You will hear from us,” they wrote to readers on the Facebook page of the newspaper.

In recent years, many media have fallen into the hands of pro-Orban owners. On the sale of Nepszabadsag, with a circulation of 40,000, has been speculated for a long time.

Government corruption in Hungary: here.

Facebook whitewashes Vietnam war atrocities

Vietnamese children injured after napalm attack, AP photo

This 8 June 1972 photo shows children wounded by napalm bombs fleeing during the Vietnam war. Among them then 9-year-old Kim Phuc. Ms Kim Phuc, an adult woman now, still hurts from the napalm injuries which United States warplanes flown by the Saigon puppet regime then inflicted on her.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Norwegian newspaper after removal of Vietnam photo: Facebook abused power

Today, 10:38

The Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten has criticized Facebook sharply. In an open letter to their CEO Mark Zuckerberg, chief editor Espen Egil Hansen says that the platform has abused its power. Following the removal of a famous photo from the Vietnam war. Aftenposten is one of the largest newspapers in Norway.

The photo was used by the Norwegian writer Tom Egeland, in a story about iconic war photos. The newspaper reported this story on Facebook. On Wednesday, Facebook told Aftenposten that it would delete the photo.

Then that deletion happened within 24 hours and before the chief editor could respond, he writes. The image was removed according to Hansen because it showed a naked girl, Kim Phuc. When Egeland responded on Facebook to the deletion the platform decided to make it impossible for the writer to post any messages, says Hansen.

“This is serious”

“Listen, Mark,” Hansen writes. “This is serious. First you decide to make no distinction between child pornography and famous war photos and apply your rules without thinking properly. Then you censor criticism and debate about the decision and also punish critics.”

Hansen calls Zuckerberg the most powerful editor of the world. “I am convinced that you abused your power”, says Hansen. “I also think you have thought insufficiently.” Hansen also points to the role of the media in the Vietnam War: they made sure Americans did not get to see the true face of the conflict.

The Norwegian editor asks Zuckerberg what he will do if again terrible images turn up.


Hansen is not the first person criticizing Facebook’s policies. The platform often removes photographs and critics say that is against freedom of expression. Known in the Netherlands is an example of cartoonist Ruben L. Oppenheimer. A drawing by him was removed and then put back.

The guidelines of Facebook say that pictures of naked people will be removed.

Including on famous ancient paintings. Somewhat like Rupert Murdoch and Silvio Berlusconi.

The company always says they do that based on reports from users. The decision to remove a photograph is then taken by an employee of the company. In the case of the Vietnam picture this is startling, because this is a very famous photograph which has been published worldwide on countless occasions.

One of many reasons why I am not on Facebook, including this one and this one and this one, etc.

Meanwhile, eg, the Dutch neonazis of the Nederlandse Volksunie are welcome to spew their racist hatred on Facebook.

Turkish government attacks terrorists … whoops, teachers

This video says about itself:

Turkish weapons ‘heading to end in ISIS hands’: RT speaks to Cumhuriyet journalists

1 December 2015

Anger over the arrest of two prominent journalists is gathering steam in Turkey. Police used pepper spray to push back protesters in Ankara rallying in their support… while in Istanbul, hundreds also gathered outside the newspaper’s headquarters in a show of solidarity.

In September 2015, the Egyptian military dictatorship killed twelve terroristswhoops-a-daisy, they turned out to be Mexican tourists.

Maybe Tony Blair, extremely well-paid adviser to the Sisi dictatorship in Egypt, has advised the Egyptian regime to have a very broad definition of who is a ‘terrorist’? Just like when Mr Blair was still Prime Minister of Britain? After all, the words ‘terrorist’ and ‘tourist’ both have the letters t, r, s and i. [sarcasm off]

Also in September 2015, Dutch police arrested a terrorist … whoops-a-daisy, he was a homeless teenager. However, that teenager looked like a Muslim, and according to racists all Muslims are terroristsNOT!

Now, on to 1 September 2016. Dutch police in a supermarket in Medemblik town have arrested two terrorists … whoops-a-daisy, they were tourists.

Now, on to today. The Turkish government has suspended 11,500 teachers. This comes after the thousands of teachers already suspended for supposed links to the Gülen movement, spuriously accused of complicity in the recent military coup attempt in Turkey (even the most ham-fisted coup plotting army colonel will not involve thousands of teachers in his putsch plans).

This new wave of suspensions of teachers is not about the Gülen movement, but about teachers suspected of sympathy for the leftist HDP opposition party and Turkish and Syrian Kurdish parties. This makes those teachers ‘terrorists’ according to Turkish President Erdogan. While the Turkish and Syrian Kurds are the only effective opponent of the real terrorists, ISIS.

After all, the words ‘terrorist’ and ‘teacher’ both have the letters t, e, and r. [sarcasm off]