Murdoch’s O’Reilly sacked for sexual harassment


This 19 April 2017 video from the USA says about itself:

FOX News Bill O’Reilly FIRED For Sexually Harassing Co-Workers.

BILL O’REILLY IS OUT The Fox star has been let go from the network following a mass exodus of advertisers over sexual harassment allegations. Executives at Fox reportedly fear more will come out in the coming months. O’Reilly’s name has already been scrubbed from “The Factor,” a show he hosted to much acclaim for 20 years, and Tucker Carlson is taking over his time slot. This is what Twitter thinks O’Reilly will do next. Here’s how the rise of President Donald Trump led to O’Reilly’s fall. And take a look at the timeline of the “nine and a half months that shook Fox News.” [HuffPost]

BILL O’REILLY TO RECEIVE $25 MILLION PAYOUT FROM FOX As part of his settlement to leave the network. Here’s why his fall from grace was particularly steep and what it means for the culture at Fox. And yes, O’Reilly did once write a fictional novel about a fired newsman’s murderous revenge. [HuffPost]

First Roger Ailes, Now Bill O’Reilly: Sexual Harassment Scandal Ousts Top Men at Fox News: here.

Roger Ailes did sexually harass me,’ says former Fox journalist Alisyn Camerota. Ex-Fox News chair allegedly told Camerota, who spent more than a decade at the channel and is now at CNN, joining him in a hotel room would help her career: here.

Black employees allege discrimination by Fox, say bosses made them arm wrestle white colleagues: here.

United States militarist media egg on militarist Trump


This video from the USA says about itself:

18 April 2017

Donald Trump cultivated legitimacy among the press when he recently decided to become exponentially more belligerent with respect to his foreign policy. In this segment we discuss how the media has been fawning over his newfangled militaristic behavior, and how it’s dangerously emboldening him to be even more aggressive internationally.

How the Media is Praising Trump’s War in Syria: here.

Madman Trump Drops Largest Non-Nuclear Bomb: here.

Washington Post Writer Doesn’t Initially Disclose He’s a Tomahawk Lobbyist: here.

The repeated statements by US Vice President Mike Pence and other Trump administration officials Monday that the “era of strategic patience” with North Korea is over and “all options are on the table” have laid bare the mounting threat that Washington will provoke a war on the Korean peninsula involving the use of nuclear weapons and the deaths of millions: here.

So listen well, manager, or supervisor of what you yourself call the “free world”. Or how should I call you, President? Ok, fine, President [Trump]… If you shoot your Tomahawk missiles at them, at DPRK [North Korea], (as you recently did at Syria), or if you drop your bloody “Mother of All Bombs” on them (as you just did on some god-forsaken hamlet in Afghanistan, just in order to demonstrate your spite and destructive force), their bodies will be torn to pieces, people will die in tremendous agony; wives will be howling in despair burying their husbands, grandparents will be forced to cover the dead bodies of their tiny grandchildren with white sheets, entire neighborhoods and villages will cease to exist: here.

Trump administration announces new military operation in Somalia: here.

British media anti-left Labour witchhunt


This video from Birmingham in England says about itself:

Stand Up To Racism | Jeremy Corbyn

12 October 2015

Jeremy Corbyn stands up against racism, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and fascism.

Filmed and edited by Adam Yosef

By Felicity Collier in Britain:

Pro-Corbyn Labour roots protest at Blairite brochure

Thursday 6th April 2017

GRASSROOTS Labour activists will rally outside the offices of the New Statesman today in protest at the magazine’s “bias” in running a 30-page attack on Jeremy Corbyn.

A series of editorials, articles and contributions in the liberal weekly’s edition last week urged opposition to the Labour leader, including a call for Mr Corbyn and his shadow chancellor John McDonnell to quit the party.

One article headline reads: “The stench of decay and failure coming from the Labour Party is now overwhelming,” and betrays its prejudices when editor Jason Cowley admits: “From the beginning we were opposed to the Corbyn leadership.”

Elsewhere, the editor of

Rupert Murdoch owned

The Times is given a guest spot to state: “It will probably require a resounding general election defeat to make Labour come to its senses, root out Momentum and retake the territory that Tony Blair so successfully occupied.”

It looks like the ‘New’ Statesman has become an old ‘New’ Labour=old Tory statesman.

A Momentum Camden member, who did not wish to be named, told the Star: “Thousands of members voted for Jeremy Corbyn to lead the Labour Party — yet the media and the Establishment are trying to sabotage democracy.

The group will protest outside the magazine’s offices at 71-73 Carter Lane in central London from 5 to 6pm.

The one-eyed attacks on Mr Corbyn have continued in the broadcasting media. On Tuesday, Jeremy Corbyn was asked by an ITV News presenter: “If you’re so concerned about what the Conservative government is doing, wouldn’t it be an idea to step aside?”

Mr Corbyn answered: “We have a strong opposition in Britain — if you bothered to report what we are doing; if you bothered to report what Jon Ashworth is doing on the health service; what Angela Rayner is doing and saying on schools; if you bothered to report what the Labour Party is actually saying.

“It’s your responsibility to make sure the opposition voice is heard as well as the government’s.

Mr Corbyn commented later: “The media must stop treating politics like a game and do its job of informing people about what the government is doing and what we’ll do differently.”

Bill O’Reilly, another Murdoch-Fox sexual harassment scandal


This 2 April 2017 CNN video from the USA is called Lisa Bloom on Bill O’Reilly sexual harassment settlements.

After the resignation of Roger Ailes, boss of Rupert Murdoch-owned Fox News, because of sexual abuse

By Rebecca Shapiro in the USA:

04/04/2017 01:45 am ET

Hyundai Pulls Upcoming Ads From ‘O’Reilly Factor’ Amid ‘Disturbing’ Allegations

The decision comes after a bombshell New York Times investigation into sexual harassment claims made against Fox News host Bill O’Reilly.

Hyundai announced on Monday that it will pull advertising spots slated to air during “The O’Reilly Factor” amid sexual harassment claims leveled at the Fox News host.

The decision came after Mercedes-Benz withdrew its advertising spots following a New York Times investigation that reported Bill O’Reilly and Fox News had paid about $13 million in settlements to address sexual harassment and other behavioral complaints brought forth by five women who previously worked with the host.

New York Times reporter Emily Steel, who co-bylined the bombshell report, tweeted Hyundai’s statement late Monday night. The automaker said it had upcoming spots planned for “The O’Reilly Factor,” but would reallocate them after learning about the “recent and disturbing allegations.”

Mercedes-Benz shared a similar sentiment on Monday.

“The allegations are disturbing and, given the importance of women in every aspect of our business, we don’t feel this is a good environment in which to advertise our products right now,” Mercedes-Benz spokeswoman Donna Boland said.

In a statement to The New York Times, O’Reilly denied the harassment allegations, adding that his role at the network made him a target. …

The typically pugnacious host, who has previously addressed a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against him, did not say a word about the latest revelations during Monday night’s broadcast.

O’Reilly’s show is considered the most valuable to the news network, raking in millions of viewers each night during a coveted primetime spot. Fox News reportedly extended his contract, which was set to expire this year.

‘O’Reilly Factor’ Loses About 15 Advertisers. Here Are The Ones That Stayed. The exodus comes after new revelations about sexual harassment claims against the Fox News host: here.

WILL BILL O’REILLY MAKE IT THROUGH THIS SCANDAL? Media reporter Michael Calderone breaks down why this harassment scandal is different. At least 40 advertisers have pulled their ads from his show. But President Trump defended the Fox News host, saying “I don’t think Bill did anything wrong.” [HuffPost]

Fox has hired the firm that investigated sexual harassment claims against Roger Ailes to look into Bill O’Reilly.

BILL O’REILLY ANNOUNCED VACATION PLANS Amid news he may not have a job when he returns. [HuffPost]

BILL O’REILLY REPORTEDLY ON THE CHOPPING BLOCK Multiple outlets are reporting that the Murdoch family is leaning toward axing O’Reilly. The reports follow a new claim by attorney Lisa Bloom, who said the TV host used to call a black woman “hot chocolate.” [HuffPost]

And the news for Fox keeps going from bad to worse: former Fox News host Alisyn Camerota accused former CEO Roger Ailes of sexually harassing her and a Fox News contributor also leveled sexual harassment claims against host Sean Hannity. And cable rivals are circling for those primetime viewers. [HuffPost]

Yemen, Somalia wars and British Guardian daily


This video from the USA says about itself:

14 October 2016

The United States Navy fired missiles at sites in Yemen, continuing America’s long tradition of perpetual wars for profit.

Jimmy Dore breaks it down.

By Ian Sinclair in Britain:

Please don’t mention Western intervention

Wednesday 29th March 2017

By downplaying the West’s role in Yemen and Somalia, the Guardian is keeping its readers ignorant of the true nature of Western foreign policy, says IAN SINCLAIR

EARLIER this month Stephen O’Brien, the United Nations undersecretary-general for humanitarian affairs, warned the world was facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the second world war.

Speaking to the UN security council, O’Brien said more than 20 million people in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and Nigeria were facing starvation and famine.

Following up on this, on March 17 2017 the Guardian published a report on Yemen, noting that aid agencies have warned the country is “at the point of no return.”

UN figures show 17 million people face severe food insecurity, the Guardian noted, including nearly seven million people deemed to be in a state of emergency.

With the article relegated to page 29 of the newspaper, there was just one oblique mention of the US and Britain, which the report explained “have influence over the Saudi-led coalition” currently attacking Yemen and blocking aid entering the country.

Here are the basic facts the Guardian chose not to highlight. Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia has led a coalition of countries in a bombing campaign to overthrow the Houthi government in Yemen (which itself overthrew the previous government).

According to the United Nations, there have been over 10,000 civilian casualties, with the Saudi-led coalition’s air strikes responsible for the majority.

In 2016 the Yemen Data Project — a group of academics, human rights organisers and activists — reported that one third of Saudi-led air raids have hit civilian sites such as school buildings, hospitals, markets and mosques. Martha Mundy, emeritus professor at the London School of Economics, believes that “in some regions, the Saudis are deliberately striking at agricultural infrastructure in order to destroy the civil society.”

The US and Britain have been closely collaborating with Saudi Arabia in Yemen. “We’ll support the Saudis in every practical way, short of engaging in combat… political support, of course, logistical and technical support,” the then foreign secretary Philip Hammond announced a month into the bombardment.

Speaking to me last year, activist Medea Benjamin, author of Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the US-Saudi Connection, explained Saudi Arabia is “getting munitions from the West… The US is even refuelling their planes in the air.”

President Barack Obama, described as “the reluctant interventionist” by senior Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland, sold $115 billion worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia during his eight years in office. This makes the 44th president of the United States “the most enthusiastic arms salesman to Saudi Arabia in American history,” according to senior Brookings Institution fellow Bruce Riedel.

Speaking in January 2017, O’Brien was crystal clear about the main cause of the ongoing humanitarian crisis: “The conflict in Yemen is now the primary driver of the largest food security emergency in the world.”

The Guardian has form when it comes to (not) reporting the causes of the deepening humanitarian crisis in Yemen. Surveying the newspaper’s coverage of Yemen between June 2016 and mid-January 2017, Peace News editor Milan Rai concluded: “The critical role of the Saudi blockade in creating these conditions in Yemen has been effectively suppressed by the British media, including Britain’s most liberal mainstream newspaper, the Guardian.”

According to Rai, there were 70 stories or editorials about Yemen on the Guardian website during this period: “Most of those 70 items (42 stories, 60 per cent of the total) do not mention the humanitarian crisis — or the role of the Saudi blockade — in any way at all.” And though the other 28 articles did refer to the humanitarian crisis “most did so only in a way that effectively suppressed the information,” Rai notes.

Unsurprisingly a recent YouGov/ Independent poll found more than half of British people were unaware of the war in Yemen, with just 37 per cent of 18-24 year olds aware of the conflict.

Turning to Somalia, on March 13 the Guardian published a full-page article on the ongoing humanitarian crisis in east Africa. “As many as 6.2 million Somalis — more than half the population — need urgent food assistance,” noted the Guardian, including “some districts… under the control of Islamist rebels al-Shabab, making [aid] access complicated.” There is one mention of the US: “The US government says it has spent more than $110 million on humanitarian assistance in Somalia in 2017.”

In reality, the US has been heavily involved in Somali affairs since the 1990s. These interventions, noted BBC journalist Mary Harper in her 2012 book Getting Somalia Wrong?, are viewed by “a growing number of experts” as having “contributed towards [Somalia’s] destruction as a viable nation-state.”

Speaking to Democracy Now! in 2013, journalist Jeremy Scahill explained that in the early years of the “war on terror” the George W Bush administration “made a disastrous decision to put [Somali] warlords on the CIA payroll” and “basically had them acting as an assassination squad.”

A relative stability was created for a brief period when the Islamic Courts Union took control in 2006 — quickly shattered by the December 2006 US-supported Ethiopian invasion and occupation.

The occupation, as occupations often tend to do, energised extremists, with Somali journalist Jamal Osman explaining “al-Shabab was born when Ethiopia invaded Somalia in 2006 and some still see the group as a resistance movement.”

Since then the US has been trying to destroy the group its actions helped create. In 2012 the Los Angeles Times reported: “The US has been quietly equipping and training thousands of African soldiers to wage a widening proxy war against the Shabab.”

“Officially, the troops are under the auspices of the African Union,” the report explained. “But in truth, according to interviews by US and African officials and senior military officers and budget documents, the 15,000-strong force pulled from five African countries is largely a creation of the State Department and Pentagon.” The US government “is trying to achieve US military goals with minimal risk of American deaths and scant public debate,” the Los Angeles Times noted.

Since then the US has intensified its clandestine war in Somalia “using special operations troops, air strikes, private contractors and African allies in an escalating campaign against Islamist militants,” the New York Times reported last year.

Like Yemen, the US military involvement in Somalia has harmed the country’s ability to deal with humanitarian crises. For example, though the Financial Times explains the looming famine in Somalia is primarily the result of regional drought, it goes on to note: “The lack of effective government and an insurgency by al-Shabab, an al-Qaida linked jihadist group, have not helped.”

This quick survey of the Guardian’s recent coverage of Yemen and Somalia puts the lie to Guardian regular Polly Toynbee’s claim that the newspaper is “always free to hold power to account: to take on politicians, global corporations, the secret security state or great vested interests.”

The Guardian may well be free to hold power to account but it’s currently missing some huge open goals when it comes to Western foreign policy.

To be clear, I’m not saying the Guardian never mentions Western interference in Yemen and Somalia or links this to the growing humanitarian crises — I’m arguing the newspaper’s coverage does not match the importance of the issue.

As Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky argue in their 1988 book Manufacturing Consent, the fact “that the media provide some information about an issue… proves absolutely nothing about the adequacy or accuracy of media coverage… More important is the way they present a particular fact — its placement, tone, and frequency of repetition — and the framework of analysis in which it is placed.”

Indeed, by downplaying of US intervention in Yemen and Somalia, the Guardian has helped to keep the large swatches of the general public ignorant of Western foreign policy — a state of affairs that suits the US government’s interests, as the Los Angeles Times report above makes clear.

Up To 50,000 Cases Of Cholera Expected In Somalia By This Summer: WHO. Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease that can kill within hours if left untreated. Malnourished children are especially vulnerable: here.

British police spying cover-up


This video from Canada says about itself:

Quebec launches commission of inquiry into police spying on journalists

4 November 2016

Probe will have powers of a commission, including ability to call witnesses and hold public hearings. To read more: here.

By Conrad Landin in Britain:

Cops deleted files to cover up hacks

Wednesday 22nd March 2017

Whistleblower reveals spying on journalists and campaigners

UNDERCOVER cops deleted files from a police database to cover up the hacking of campaigners’ emails, a police whistleblower has alleged.

Officers reportedly deleted the files in May 2014 to conceal the fact that a police instructed operative had spied on journalists and environmental and social justice campaigners.

Scotland Yard’s national domestic extremism and disorder intelligence unit, which was behind the spying, is one of a number of covert squads under the scope of the upcoming Pitchford undercover policing inquiry.

Green peer Jenny Jones, who has raised the alarm about officers shredding files relating to her own surveillance, was provided with the information by the whistleblower in a letter, her spokesman confirmed to the Star yesterday.

Ms Jones’s lawyers confirmed with six of the 10 targeted activists that their email usernames and passwords were the same as those the whistleblower had stated.

Ms Jones then referred the whistleblower’s letter to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) and the public inquiry team.

“The personal information within the letter is accurate and it could only have been obtained illegally,” she said.

“There is more than enough to justify a full-scale criminal investigation into the activities of these police officers and referral to a public inquiry.

“I have urged the IPCC to act quickly to secure further evidence and to find out how many people were victims of this nasty practice.”

An IPCC spokesman said the agency was “still assessing the scope of the investigation” and could not make further comment.

The whistleblower, who formerly worked for the covert unit, said passwords had been passed on by a “covert human intelligence source,” a term agencies use for their spies.

According to the Guardian newspaper, the unit worked with police in India who used hackers to illegally obtain passwords.

The upcoming inquiry will consider abusive practices including the deception of women activists into relationships with officers, and spying on trade unionists.

Inquiry chairman Sir Christopher Pitchford said: “I welcome Baroness Jones’s decision to bring these allegations to the attention of the inquiry.

“In my view, the IPCC is undoubtedly the right body to investigate … At present the inquiry is unaware of any connection between the allegations in this letter and the inquiry’s terms of reference.

“We would welcome the opportunity to speak with the author of the letter and I would urge that person to contact the inquiry on terms of confidentiality.”