American nazi band not playing in Scotland

This video from the USA says about itself:

Teenage Sisters Singing: Neo-Nazi Beliefs Have Changed as These Two Girls Grew Up

20 July 2011

Two girls who used to play in a neo-Nazi band explain what drove them to change. For more, click here.

By Zoe Streatfield in Britain:

People power forces neonazis to cancel gig

Tuesday 18th October 2016

ANTI-RACIST campaigners claimed victory yesterday after a neonazi concert due to be held in Scotland later this month was cancelled.

US white power band Bound for Glory were booked to perform in Falkirk this Saturday but cancelled the gig due to fears that anti-racist activists would target the event.

The cancellation was announced on Sunday by organiser Vicky Pearson, who said the concert had to be called off due to a combination of adverse media attention, the likelihood that the US band members would be refused entry into Britain and fears that the venue would pull out.

A spokesman for anti-racist and anti-fascist campaign group Hope not Hate said: “While obviously we will remain vigilant to ensure that she [Ms Pearson] is true to her word, we can celebrate a huge victory for people power.”

Labour MSP Neil Findlay, who also pushed for the gig’s cancellation said: “This is really good news — groups like this have no other purpose than to spread division and hate.

“We must always to be vigilant to ensure they don’t play in any of our communities.”

More than 1,700 people contacted their MPs and MSPs over the weekend expressing their disgust at the event.

However, more than 500 tickets had been sold for what was believed to be the biggest-ever white supremacist gig in Scotland.

Scotland’s Cabinet Secretary for Justice Michael Matheson had pledged to write to Westminister Home Secretary Amber Rudd recommending that she refuse the entry of the band to Britain.

Mr Matheson said: “There is no place for hatred of this kind in Scotland.”

Last week The Washington Post published a story about Derek Black, son of Don Black, the founder of the white nationalist website Stormfront. The story is about a boy who grew up taught to hate other races and religions. He became a leader for his family’s cause. Then he went to college, and everything changed. Eli Saslow, the reporter, tells Derek Black’s story with an empathetic eye. We spoke to Saslow about this story by phone on Thursday. This interview has been condensed and edited: here.

American neonazis in Scotland

No nazi gig in Scotland

By Peter Lazenby and Zoe Streatfield:

Rudd urged to block visit by US nazi band

Saturday 15th October 2016

Anti-racists fear violence at Edinburgh gig

ANTI-RACIST group Hope Not Hate has called on Home Secretary Amber Rudd to ban a US neonazi rock band from entering Britain for a concert.

White power band Bound for Glory (BFG) is due to play in Edinburgh next Saturday and it is feared that hundreds of neonazis will attend, mainly from outside Scotland.

The group has organised an online petition, sent a letter to Ms Rudd and urged the Scottish government to ban the concert.

Hope Not Hate director Nick Lowles warned: “This will be the largest white power concert ever to take place in Scotland.”

A neonazi concert in Cambridgeshire last month was attended by 600 fascists.

Bound for Glory were refused entry to Britain in the 1990s, with the lead singer blaming “the Jewish-controlled government.”

Mr Lowles said: “Most of those attending the BFG gig will be from England and Germany, with as few as 100
people actually coming from Scotland.

“This means that over 400 nazis will be staying in the city and, with the movement’s history of violence, this is a clear threat to the diverse communities of Edinburgh.”

He said the concert was being organised by London-based Vicky Pearson — who has been involved in the Blood and Honour neonazi music scene — and her Scottish-based boyfriend Thomas Stenhouse.

Volunteers running the Morning Star’s weekly sales stall in Glasgow are regularly confronted by neonazis shouting “Sieg heil.”

Volunteer Tommy Morrison said: “Sometimes they are mob-handed. They try to cause trouble and cause fights.”

He appealed for more volunteers to staff the stall.

Regular volunteer and Communist Party member Keith Stoddart, a pensioner, chased off a fascist last Saturday.

“A young guy from National Action ran up to the stall and grabbed a flag and ran away.

“I ran after him — the guy stopped, gave a nazi salute, and shouted ‘Race traitors’ and ran off.

“I wanted to engage with him and explain how fascist and racist beliefs damage our communities, not just get the flag back.”

Scottish wildlife reserve from the air, video

This video from Scotland says about itself:

19 September 2016

Take a bird’s-eye tour of RSPB Mersehead and immerse yourself in its unique and spectacular scenery. As you can see from our stunning footage, Mersehead is a reserve unlike any other

Racist firebombs Scottish mosque

Edinburgh Central Mosque

By Lamiat Sabin in Britain:

Mosque arson was hate crime

Monday 19th September 2016

POLICE said yesterday they are treating an arson attack on Edinburgh Central Mosque as a hate crime.

It sustained minor fire damage to the door and a small bush in the garden after an object was thrown at the building, situated in Potterrow, at about 2.10am on Sunday.

The suspect is a white man in his early thirties, with very short hair and wearing a short-sleeved black top with a white emblem on the front with dark trousers.

Police believe he spoke to a group of women in George Square before the incident and are urging them to come forward, as well as anyone who drove past the mosque during the attack.

Chief Inspector Mark Rennie, local area commander, said: “This was a despicable and reckless act which we are treating as a hate crime.”

Detective Inspector John Kavanagh said: “Fortunately, no-one was injured as a result of this incident but the consequences could have been far worse had the fire taken hold and spread.”

Edinburgh and Lothians Regional Equality Council (ELREC) chairman Foysol Choudhury strongly condemned the crime as “an attack against our freedom of religion and expression.”

He said: “Edinburgh cannot tolerate any action that aims to spread hate and division within its society.

“ELREC would like to uphold Police Scotland’s request for everyone who has any information to contact them and wishes to offer support to anyone who feels more insecure after this attack.”

Anyone with information can contact police on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555-111, where information can be given anonymously.

Beyoncé concert in Scotland, review

This video from Scotland says about itself:

7 July 2016

Beyoncé Dedicates “Freedom” Song & Sings Acapella at Formation Tour in Glasgow (VIDEO SNIPPETS).

The lyrics of the song are here.

By Zoe Streatfield in Scotland:

Queen Bey rules in breathtaking show of black power

Wednesday 13th July 2016

Hampden Park, Glasgow

FACE veiled, at the show’s opening Beyonce struts on stage accompanied by a troupe of dancers and unleashes a set of breathtakingly executed moves.

Such is her power that as she reveals her face during opener Formation, the mostly female audience scream at their first glimpse of Queen Bey.

It’s the first track to be released from her latest album, which effortlessly covers issues ranging from police shootings of black people in the US and the abandonment of the black working-class by the political elite to what it means to be a black woman.

Referencing the failure of the Bush administration to help the black community during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, over the PA black rapper and activist Messy Mya demands: “What happened at New Orleans?”

In the song Beyonce celebrates her own mixed-race heritage, challenges Eurocentric beauty standards and puts down the hate she has received over her decision not to submit to white standards of beauty when it comes to her toddler’s hair.

“I like my baby heir with baby hair and afros/I like my negro nose with Jackson Five nostrils,” she declaims.

Later, in a direct tribute to the Black Lives Matter movement, she holds a minute’s silence for the latest victims Alton Sterling and Philando Castile as the huge four-screen cube onstage is emblazoned with the names of other black people killed by the police.

As she delivers the Black Lives Matter anthem Freedom, her dancers do the iconic black power salute which caused so much controversy during her US Super Bowl performance last year.

It’s courageous of Beyonce to tackle such weighty issues and her commitment is such that she and her rapper husband Jay Z have donated $1.5 million to the Black Lives Matter movement and unobtrusively bailed out activists arrested during the Ferguson and Baltimore protests.

But money and fame as the main indicator of success has been always been a theme throughout Beyonce’s career and it undermines the issues she raises when she sings about race relations while also singing about paparazzi, her Givenchy dresses and flying around in her chopper.

Hers seems to be a life so far removed from the lives she seeks to give voice to and I wonder why, after celebrating the achievements of the Black Lives Matter movement, she delivers lyrics like: “I just might be a black Bill Gates in the making” and “Always stay gracious, best revenge is your paper.”

I’d like to think that she’s singing about the Morning Star but she’s probably singing about money.