Scottish water voles and water


This 29 April 2019 video from Britain says about itself:

Do water voles really need water? | Natural History Museum

Water voles are normally found near waterways. But in 2008, Cath Scott, Biodiversity Officer at Glasgow City Council, was called to an unusual finding: water voles living in urban areas a kilometre away from any water.

In this video, Cath tells us more about Glasgow’s unique population of water voles.

For more on this story, see here.

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Bringing lynxes back to Scotland, new study


This 2017 video from Britain says about itself:

Rewilding the UK with Lynx

BBC’s Mike Dilger discusses the benefits of Lynx reintroduction.

From the University of Stirling in Scotland:

Proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland

March 29, 2019

Experts have used an innovative approach to model the proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland.

Researchers used state-of-the-art tools to help identify the most suitable location for lynx reintroduction in Scotland — and how this choice might affect the size of a population and its expansion over subsequent decades. Significantly, they believe their model will inform and enhance decision-making around large carnivore reintroductions worldwide.

The study was led by University of Stirling PhD researcher Tom Ovenden as part of his Masters in Environmental Forestry at Bangor University, with support from the University of Aberdeen.

Mr Ovenden said: “Reintroducing large carnivores is often complicated and expensive, meaning that getting things right first time is extremely important. Therefore, advances in modelling approaches, as utilised during our study, are extremely valuable.

“Our research considered several proposed reintroduction sites, showing how these models can be used as a safe and relatively inexpensive way of assessing the suitability of reintroduction proposals and providing the evidence required to inform decision-making at an early stage.

“Recent advances in both ecological theory and modelling approaches have made the incorporation of individual species’ complex behaviours in novel environments more realistic. We applied this approach to the potential reintroduction of Eurasian lynx in Scotland — and demonstrated the power of this new, sophisticated model. Our research demonstrates the potential of this approach to be applied elsewhere to help improve reintroduction success in large carnivores, from the safety of a modelling environment.”

The lynx is thought to have become extinct in the UK during the medieval period, around 1,300 years ago. In recent years, its potential reintroduction has been widely debated.

Using current land cover data, Mr Ovenden conducted an initial desk-based study to establish the current location and extent of suitable forest habitat for lynx in Scotland, updating historic work. Further research to identify the demographic and dispersal characteristics of the lynx elsewhere in Europe, provided the model with the necessary parameters.

The team used this information to investigate the suitability of three proposed release sites: the Scottish component of Kielder Forest, in the Borders; Aberdeenshire; and the Kintyre Peninsula. They used the model to assess how the lynx would establish a population, spread and colonise new habitat from each potential reintroduction site over a period of 100 years.

The results showed that Scotland possesses sufficient, connected habitat to offer a realistic chance of population establishment and that some sites are more suitable than others.

Of the three sites considered, the study indicated that the Kintyre Peninsula was the most suitable, with the population spreading across the Highlands in the 100 years following release. Significantly, the Central Belt would act as a barrier to colonisation between the Highlands and Southern Uplands providing evidence for two distinct habitat networks.

“This initial research is encouraging and suggests that Scotland is indeed ecologically suitable for the reintroduction of Eurasian lynx — but this suitability is highly dependent on where reintroduction takes place and more modelling work is required,” Mr Ovenden said. “Our research informs one aspect of a complex decision-making process that must involve a wide range of stakeholders and, as a result, it does not recommend whether we should, or should not, reintroduce Eurasian lynx to Scotland.

“We have established a solid foundation upon which more modelling can now be conducted, however, further research is required to assess other important issues — such as socio-economic factors and public attitudes — to enable informed, comprehensive decision-making. It is our hope that this tool will not only provide evidence to guide the current debate in Scotland, but can be used more widely in discussions around large carnivore reintroductions globally.”

Jo Pike, Director of Public Affairs at the Scottish Wildlife Trust, said: “Returning the lynx to our landscape as a top predator could help restore the health of Scotland’s natural ecosystems. Any future reintroduction would have to be carefully planned, widely consulted on, and rigorously assessed against national and international guidelines. This research is a useful contribution to the evidence base that needs to be developed over the coming years.”

Notably, Mr Ovenden wrote his entire dissertation using solar power, while running the Handa Island nature reserve, in the Inner Hebrides, for the Scottish Wildlife Trust. He worked under the supervision of Professor John Healey, of Bangor University, and collaborated with Dr Steve Palmer and Professor Justin Travis, of the University of Aberdeen.

Mr Ovenden is now working towards a PhD at Stirling, in collaboration with Forest Research and The Scottish Forestry Trust, on the resilience of UK forests to extreme climatic events.

The study, Improving reintroduction success in large carnivores through individual-based modelling: how to reintroduce Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) to Scotland, is published in Biological Conservation.

Scottish Highlands, unique wildlife


This 12 November 2012 video says about itself:

The Unique Wildlife of The Scottish Highlands | Short Film Showcase

Be transported to the frozen tundra of Scotland’s Cairngorms National Park in this stunning short by filmmaker Max Smith. Watch reindeer forage for food and mountain hares seemingly vanish into a snowy backdrop. The Sense of Place series offers an intimate view of the most wild and remote habitats still left in the U.K, aiming to show the true value of these rare and fragile ecosystems.

Featuring ptarmigans and a snow bunting.

Siberian rubythroat on Fair Isle, Scotland


Siberian rubythroats are very rare in western Europe.

Young golden eagles freed in Scotland


This 21 August 2018 video says about itself:

Golden eagles have been released in the south of Scotland as part of a £1.3 million project to boost the iconic raptors in an area where there numbers are at a historic low. Three chicks were transported from eyries in the Highlands to a secret location in the Moffat Hills.

The South of Scotland Eagle Project is now calling on volunteers to support project staff, and the Scottish Raptor Study Group, in monitoring sightings of the birds.

By Conrad Landin in Scotland:

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Golden eagle chicks successfully released into the Scottish wild

GOLDEN eagle chicks have been successfully released into the wild in southern Scotland in the first of a “ground-breaking” series of relocations.

Three of the young birds of prey, named Edward, Beaky and Emily by primary school pupils, have been moved from the Highlands to a secret location.

The £1.3 million project is part of efforts to increase the number of golden eagles in the Southern Uplands, where they have become rare.

South of Scotland Golden Eagle Project chairman Mark Oddy said: “Arguably Scotland’s most iconic bird, in recent decades, the south Scotland golden eagle population has been small and fragmented.

“We want to give it a helping hand to overcome problems in the past which have limited the size and viability of the population.”

The golden eagle is the second-largest bird in Britain, beaten only by the white-tailed or sea eagle.