Undersea marine biology lab, video


This video, recorded off Florida in the USA, says about itself:

Aquarius Reef Base (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD’S BLUE WORLD

20 May 2016

Jonathan visits Aquarius Reef Base–the world’s only undersea lab where scientists live in saturation for days or weeks at a time, studying the ocean. It’s an amazing combination of science fiction and undersea adventure!

Tufted titmice disturbed by highway noise


This video from North America is called Tufted Titmouse spring call.

From the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in the USA:

Highway noise deters communication between birds

May 11, 2016

Summary:

Northern cardinals and tufted titmice are two abundant bird species in the woods of eastern North America. Many bird and mammal species rely on information from tufted titmice calls to detect and respond to dangerous predators. This causes important information networks to form around tufted titmouse communication. Results of a new study suggests that too much noise around highways keeps birds from hearing warnings from fellow birds about predators in the area, and that puts them at a higher risk of being eaten. It is also possible that the birds are hearing the alarms, but are too distracted by the noise to respond to them.

New research from University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers shows birds may be avoiding habitats near noisy highways because they can’t hear fellow birds’ alarms that warn them of attacking hawks or owls.

Some highways cut through or run along natural areas, and researchers know that wild birds often make their homes away from those highways, but they don’t know why.

UF/IFAS researchers tested whether highway noise could be interfering with bird communication. Results of their study suggest too much noise around these highways keeps birds from hearing warnings from fellow birds about predators in the area, and that puts them at a higher risk of being eaten. It is also possible that the birds are hearing the alarms, but are too distracted by the noise to respond to them.

The researchers caution that they did not establish a causal link between highway noise and bird population reductions, although noise-disrupting alarm calls is a compelling possibility.

“Conservation of bird species should include decreasing noise in sensitive wildlife areas,” said Aaron Grade, who led the study as part of his master’s thesis in the UF/IFAS wildlife ecology and conservation department.

Grade and his graduate adviser, UF/IFAS wildlife ecology and conservation professor Katie Sieving, tested the abilities of northern cardinals to hear the predator alarm of tufted titmice by playing alarm calls to cardinals through speakers in both noisy and quiet locations in Florida state parks. They found that noise from vehicles along the busy highways often drowns out the alarms emitted by birds. Researchers went to Florida state forests near Interstate 75 and U.S. 441 in Alachua, Marion and Columbia counties to test whether highway noise could interfere with bird communication.

Northern cardinals and tufted titmice are two abundant bird species in the woods of eastern North America. Many bird and mammal species rely on information from tufted titmice calls to detect and respond to dangerous predators. This causes important information networks to form around tufted titmouse communication. Normally, northern cardinals listen to tufted titmouse predator alarm calls and will typically respond by fleeing or freezing until the danger passes.

But when tested near noisy roads, cardinals failed to respond to titmouse alarm calls, suggesting that the noise may prevent cardinals from escaping when there are dangerous predators around, Sieving said.

“Our work suggests that disruption of animal communication networks could hinder natural behaviors of wildlife and help explain patterns of reduced biodiversity near roadways,” said Grade, now a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts.

The study was published online in April in the journal Biology Letters.

Marine wildlife in Florida, USA, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Jonathan Bird’s Blue World: Muck Diving in Florida

6 May 2016

Diving around a sandy, muddy, or rubbly sea floor is often called “muck” diving–even though there is rarely any actual muck. There are all kinds of unique and interesting animals that live in this habitat. Jonathan joins muck expert Jeff Nelson to visit a world-renown muck diving site under the Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, Florida to find all kinds of weird and outlandish animals like sea horses, octopuses (octopods!), batfish, snake eels, sea hares, and stingrays. But his main interest is finding a jawfish with eggs. You won’t believe how the male jawfish guards his eggs!

Alligators, other wildlife in Florida, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Florida‘s Alligator Road – Jane’s Scenic Drive

17 apr. 2016

Unique Florida Eco-Tourism experience – Jane’s Scenic Drive in Fakahatchee Strand State Park. This mini-documentary takes a 22 mile drive through the primordial Florida swamp. Exotic plants, birds and wildlife. More information here and here.

Wood stork nesting colony in Florida, USA, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

3 April 2016

Giant Wood Storks mating is a sight to behold! A Rookery with about two dozen Wood Storks in varying stages of mating, nest building and incubating is exciting to observe and also realize that this once endangered and now “threatened” stork is on the slow road to recovery.

Widespread in central and South America these storks are seriously impacted in the coastal southeast U.S. by continued habitat loss, with a few large protected rookeries such as this one in Palm Beach County, Florida at Wakodahatchee Wetlands making a big difference. Long telephoto lenses are critical as one should stay well away from nesting storks and not disturb them.

Tall and long-legged, the wood stork is the largest wading bird native to America. Wood storks are large, long-legged wading birds, about 45 inches tall, with a wingspan of 60 to 65 inches. The plumage is white except for black primaries and secondaries and a short black tail. The head and neck are largely unfeathered and dark gray in color. The bill is black, thick at the base, and slightly decurved. Immature birds have dingy gray feathers on their head and a yellowish bill.

This is a subtropical and tropical species which breeds in much of South America, Central America and the Caribbean. The wood stork is the only stork that presently breeds in North America. In the United States there is a small breeding population in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, along with a recently discovered rookery in southeastern North Carolina. After a successful three-decade conservation effort resulting in an increased population in the southeastern United States, the wood stork was removed from the endangered species list and upgraded to threatened on June 26, 2014.

Palm warbler in Florida, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

2 April 2016

Palm Warbler on its winter grounds in Florida, soon to be heading far north to breed. A bright, distinguished and energetic Warbler, it is most noteworthy for its chestnut cap, yellow highlights and constant wagging of its tail. This is a very difficult bird to film while foraging in heavy brush – most of this video is in slow motion!

Green iguana in Florida, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

31 March 2016

Large male Green Iguana basking in the Florida sun. Escaped or released pet iguanas are now freely breeding in the wild and gradually spreading northward with warm winters. Small Iguanas and their eggs have many predators that eat them limiting their numbers, but once they reach two feet tall and larger they have few natural enemies. They can reach six feet in length, but 3 or 4 feet long like this one is more common. This one was spotted in Palm Beach County. Hard winter freezes will generally limit their northward advances to around Palm Beach County. They are excellent tree climbers and although primarily herbivore will take birds and eggs in the nest if found. They are of course invasive and can be legally killed if on private property and done humanely and their meat is said to be a delicacy in central and South America.

More info:

Habits

Adult iguanas are herbivores feeding on foliage, flowers, and fruit. They will occasionally eat animal material such as insects, lizards, and other small animals, nestling birds and eggs. Juveniles eat more animal material, especially insects, and hatchling green iguanas eat the droppings of adult iguanas to acquire the gut bacteria that help them digest plant material. Males are territorial against other males, but are not territorial against females and juveniles. These large lizards like to bask in open areas, sidewalks, docks, seawalls, landscape timbers, or open mowed areas. If frightened, they dive into water (green iguanas and basilisks) or retreat into their burrows (spiny tailed iguanas). This habit of diving into the water to escape makes green iguanas very difficult to capture. Basilisks and anoles generally eat insects and small vertebrate prey, but Knight anoles occasionally eat small fruits and flowers as well.

Read more here.