US American killer of Trayvon Martin now pro-slavery ‘artist’


This video from the USA says about itself:

Trayvon Martin’s parents lead rallies in US

20 July 2013

Trayvon Martin’s parents have been joined by celebrities, civil rights activists and protesters as they led rallies in New York and Florida to show their anger at the acquittal of the man who shot and killed their unarmed teenage son. Sybrina Fulton led a rally of more than a thousand people in New York, along with veteran civil rights activist Reverend Al Sharpton, where she told the crowd that the picture painted of her son, Trayvon, during the trial depicted a man she did not recognise. Marches, under the banner of “Justice for Trayvon”, also took place in Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta and many other cities. Al Jazeera’s Cath Turner reports from New York City.

By James Tweedie in Britain:

US: Killer’s Confederate art on sale in gun shop

Wednesday 19th August 2015

Flag paintings by Trayvon Martin’s shooter are on sale in anti-Muslim shop

A FLORIDA gun shop that refuses to serve Muslims is selling signed prints of a Confederate flag painted by the killer of black teenager Trayvon Martin.

George Zimmerman painted his version of the symbol of slavery as a tribute to Florida Gun Supply owner Andy Hallinan “for being a true patriot and leading the country into a better, safer America.”

This video from the USA says about itself:

Confederate Flag: No Honor in Fighting for an Unjust Cause

1 July 2015

Bill Starr has a South Carolina lineage that predates the Revolution, and ancestors who fought in the Civil War for the Confederate States of America. He wants the Confederate flag to come down. [MORE: here.]

Annabel Park of Story of America spoke to Mr. Starr during the ceremonial lying in state for slain Civil Rights leader and State Senator Clementa Pinckney at the South Carolina state capitol in Columbia, SC.

The Confederate battle flag was raised over the South Carolina capitol dome in 1962 as a symbol of defiance of the Civil Rights movement. In 2002, a compromise in the state legislature moved the flag to a Confederate war memorial in front of the dome, with the United States flag and the South Carolina state flag replacing the Confederate flag atop the dome.

In the wake of the June 17, 2015 massacre at the Mother Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC, lawmakers including both US Senators and the governor of the state (all Republicans) asked the legislature to vote to remove the flag from state grounds as a symbol of healing, unity and inclusion.

“It’s unbearable to think that a hundred and fifty years after the end of the Civil War, fifty years after the end of legal segregation, that people are still being murdered for the crime of having been the victims of the greatest crime in history, which is what slavery was” begins Starr. He recounts his Confederate ancestry but explains that they weren’t slave-owners, just poor people drafted “sent to fight for a bunch of rich slave owners to defend the most unjust institution in history, and there is no honor in that, there is nothing to be proud of in that. The 300,000 Confederate soldiers who died in that war were murdered by slavery just as surely as the millions who died on the plantations.”

The James Tweedie article continues:

The prints are being sold at the discount price of $50 (£32) on the shop’s website, accompanied by a paranoid “mini-documentary” video dated Monday entitled Cultural Cleansing & Bias Media = Time for Change! featuring reactionaries such as rocker Ted Nugent.

The signed canvas crudely depicts the Confederate battle flag with the slogan “the second defends our first,” implying that the constitutional second amendment right to bear arms is the only protection of the first amendment right to freedom of speech.

The killer explains: “The first flag I painted on this canvas was an American flag, but decided to repaint over it with the Confederate flag when I heard Andy was getting sued by Cair,” the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

“The second flag I painted was the battle flag, which we need in America in order to protect the first.”

The website claims: “You cannot have the first amendment without the second, and you cannot have the American flag if you remove the battle flag,” in apparent ignorance of the fact that the present US flag pre-dates the Confederate banner by 84 years.

The website screams: “The media is calling you racist. Why are they calling you racist if you’re not?” claiming that the flag is only used by “a small amount (sic) of people to incite racism.”

A previous daub by Mr Zimmerman of the US flag sold on eBay for $100,000 (£64,000).

The armed vigilante was controversially acquitted in 2013 of the murder of Mr Martin, who was carrying nothing but a soft drink and a bag of sweets when he was shot the previous year.

The trial of Glendon Crawford, accused of trying to build a mobile X-ray gun to kill worshippers at a mosque in New York state, began on Monday.

Mr Crawford’s lawyer argued that his client should be acquitted because the device was useless.

United States civil rights activist Julian Bond dies


This video from the USA says about itself:

Angela Davis interviewed by Julian Bond: Explorations in Black Leadership Series

21 July 2009

Julian Bond interviews Angela Davis, civil rights activist and university professor. Dr. Davis is professor emeritus at the University of California-Santa Cruz. Their shared conversation explores her personal history and her continuing roles in human rights causes and campaigns. The series is presented by the Institute for Public History at the University of Virginia.

From Associated Press in the USA:

US civil rights activist Julian Bond dies aged 75

Longtime NAACP chair described as a visionary and tireless champion for civil and human rights

Sunday 16 August 2015 13.03 BST

Julian Bond, a US civil rights activist and longtime chair of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, has died aged 75.

Bond died on Saturday night in Fort Walton Beach, Florida after a brief illness, the Southern Poverty Law Center said.

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, he was considered a symbol and icon of the 1960s civil rights movement in the US. As a Morehouse College student, Bond helped found the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, and as its communications director he was on the frontline of protests that led to landmark civil rights laws.

He later served as chair of the 500,000-member NAACP for a decade, but declined to run again for the post in 2010. He also served in the Georgia state legislature and was a professor at American University in Washington DC and the University of Virginia.

The Southern Poverty Law Center called Bond a visionary and tireless champion for civil and human rights. “With Julian’s passing, the country has lost one of its most passionate and eloquent voices for the cause of justice,” the centre’s co-founder, Morris Dees, said.

“He advocated not just for African Americans, but for every group, indeed every person subject to oppression and discrimination, because he recognised the common humanity in us all,” Dees said.

Bond is survived by his wife, Pamela Horowitz, a former staff lawyer for the law centre, his five children, a brother and a sister.

SPLC statement on Julian Bond’s death: here.

Mr Bond was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1965 but was barred from taking his seat because of his anti-Vietnam war stance. The Supreme Court ruled in his favour and he took office in ’67: here.

Black Students In The U.S. Get Criminalized While White Students Get Treatment: here.

New fish species discovery in Gulf of Mexico


This video from California in the USA says about itself:

The anglerfish: The original approach to deep-sea fishing

21 November 2014

Deep-sea anglerfish are strange and elusive creatures that are very rarely observed in their natural habitat. Fewer than half a dozen have ever been captured on film or video by deep diving research vehicles. This little angler, about 9 cm long, is named Melanocetus. It is also known as the Black Seadevil and it lives in the deep dark waters of the Monterey Canyon. MBARI‘s ROV Doc Ricketts observed this anglerfish for the first time at 600 m on a midwater research expedition in November 2014. We believe that this is the first video footage ever made of this species alive and at depth.

This video says about itself:

Fishing in the deep: observations of a deep-sea anglerfish

22 August 2012

This video shows never-before seen footage of a deep-sea angler fish, Chaunacops coloratus. In it, we summarize recent work by scientists at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The video seen here was recorded by MBARI’s ROV Doc Ricketts at depths of 7,800 – 10,800 feet below the ocean’s surface. For more information please see MBARI’s news release.

From CBS Miami in the USA:

NSU Researcher Discovers New Species Of Fish

August 5, 2015 10:44 AM

FT LAUDERDALE – As the saying goes “There’s plenty of fish in the sea,” well a Nova Southeastern University researcher recently discovered one that has never been seen before.

Tracey Sutton, Ph.D., who is part of team at NSU’s Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, discovered the new species of Ceratioid anglerfish in the northern Gulf of Mexico at a depth between 1,000-1,500 meters.

Sutton was able to identify the fish with assistance of Dr. Theodore Pietsch from the University of Washington.

At the ocean depths this fish lives in, there is no sunlight. The only light is that from creatures that produce bioluminescence, which means they generate their own light source.

The three female specimens found ranged in size from 30-95 mm in length. Looking at the fish, one quickly understands how anglerfishes get their common name.

They have an appendage at the top of their head, which resembles a fishing pole of sorts. And, like its human counterparts, this fish dangles the appendage until an unsuspecting fish swims up thinking they found a meal, only to quickly learn that they are, in fact, a meal themselves.

“Every time we go out on a deep-sea research excursion there’s a good chance we’ll see something we’ve never seen before – the life at these depths is really amazing,” Dr. Sutton said.

As for this new anglerfish, the three female specimens are considered “type specimens” (i.e. they define the species,) and as such, will reside in the Ichthyology Collection at the University of Washington, which is home to the world’s largest deep-sea anglerfish collection.

Dr. Sutton studies the ecology of marine systems, particularly those of the open ocean. As part of those efforts, Dr. Sutton is leading a team of scientists and researchers studying the effects of oil spills on deep-sea marine life. That project recently received a boost, thanks to a financial award from the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI.) NSU was awarded $8.5 million and is one of 12 organizations selected to receive part of $140 million for continued research in the area of oil spills and how we respond to them.

Beach visitors save injured hammerhead shark


This video from the USA says about itself:

Brothers Save Hammerhead Shark. Destin, Florida 2015

21 July 2015

Me and my brother fight to save an injured hammerhead shark on the Destin, FL shoreline and bravely took it to safety away from the public. My brother, once realizing it was injured, swam out to bring it to shore away from people still in the water. I filmed this heroic display as he dragged the injured 10 ft. hammerhead to shore. The shark was pulled to shore and we realized it had several deep sea fishing hooks in its mouth as well as steel fishing line tangled in and around its head. My brother, along with help from bystanders worked to get the hooks out and save the dying shark. My brother was able to pull the shark into deeper water until it was able to swim away safely in an attempt to avoid further injuring itself or the public.

All of the distress and yelling heard in the background were caused by a natural fear from certain individuals and lack of understanding the situation as well as the behaviors of hammerhead sharks. Once bystanders realized we were trying to help the shark they quickly did what they could to help

Shot on a GoPro Hero 3+ and iPhone 5

From WJHG.com in Florida in the USA:

Visitors Help Hammerhead Shark

Tue 9:51 PM, July 21, 2015

By: Zak Dahlheimer

DESTIN– UPDATE: 7/21/15 6:24 P.M.

Marcus and Logan Lakos try to make it down to the Panhandle for the summer every year.

But this year’s visit they say came with a catch.

Marcus captured his younger brother Logan pulling an injured hammerhead shark to shore at Henderson Beach State Park Monday, where they eventually removed two hooks and a lure from its mouth.

And now with battle scars after pulling the shark to shore, Logan says it was a wave of adrenaline that came over him, looking out for his mother also in the water.

“I started pulling it in and it was kind of scary, but hammerhead sharks aren’t really that dangerous to humans,” said Logan. “Knowing that, I pulled it in. Everyone else was freaking out so it was hard to bring him in. But once people started realizing we were trying to help it, some of the other guys around were all crowding around it and trying to help it.”

When he saw his brother going to save the shark, Marcus says his first instinct was to get this on video.

“I’m just like, ‘I’m going to grab my camera,'” said Marcus. “Because Logan, he’s the brave one. He’s swimming out trying to help grab it, so I wanted to grab whatever I can on film since I’m the film person. I’m sitting there, and out of nowhere, he’s dragging this thing onto shore.”

After originally pulling it onshore, both brothers say the shark ended up swimming back out into the water. After that they say they went about 50 to 100 feet down the beach, where they ended up pulling the two hooks and lure out of the shark’s mouth.

Both brothers say they’ve received praise from people who witnessed the event.

But Logan says it was really about grabbing life by the tail.

“If you see a shark out in the water, it’s not always a bad thing to grab your camera and enjoy one of nature’s greatest creatures,” said Logan.

Logan says the shark did not appear to have any other injuries after the hooks are lure were removed.

Marcus Lakos and his brother, Logan, were visiting Destin from Texas when they saw a hammerhead shark swimming near the beach.

They say Logan noticed something hanging out from the shark’s mouth and pulled it by its tail to the shore.

With the help of a few bystanders, Logan took out what appears to be a steel hook from a deep sea fishing line that was caught in the shark’s mouth.

Both brothers say they know something about sharks, Logan is an avid fisherman, and say they had an idea the shark would not hurt them.

Good Florida sea turtle news


This video from the USA says about itself:

Baby Turtles Being Born on the Beach

13 September 2013

Leatherback turtles hatching and marching towards the ocean in Vero Beach, Florida.

From NPR in the USA:

Florida Sea Turtles Stage Amazing Comeback

July 13, 2015 4:42 PM ET

When scientists first started counting the nests of green sea turtles in one area in the 1980s, they found fewer than 40 nests. In their last check, they counted almost 12,000.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Florida, sea turtles are making a comeback. The green turtle is leading the way. It’s a species that a few decades ago was close to disappearing from the state, and the scope of its recovery is virtually unprecedented for an endangered species in the United States. As Amy Green of member station WMFE reports, the gains are most apparent at a refuge on Florida’s east coast. It’s the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge in Melbourne Beach, and it’s one of the most significant sea turtle nesting sites in the world.

AMY GREEN, BYLINE: A sea turtle emerges from the waves alone, in darkness. At 3 feet long and 300 pounds, her barnacle-encrusted body is cumbersome on land, accustomed to weightlessness.

HEATHER STAPLETON: They look like an ancient dark behemoth.

GREEN: That’s Heather Stapleton of the Sea Turtle Conservancy, a research and conservation organization for the reptiles that are as old as dinosaurs.

STAPLETON: She comes up out of the surf, and she’s there. She lifts her head up a couple of times, usually, in the air to take breaths and kind of feel her way around.

GREEN: She finds a nesting site well above the tide. Her breathing is labored as her flippers fling sand over her eggs, concealing them from predators during their two-month incubation. The Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1991 to preserve this 20-mile beach on Florida’s east coast for nesting sea turtles like this one. It’s working.

LOU EHRHART: As a scientist, I have to be a little bit careful about how I throw the word miracle around, but yes, I agree that, in this case, it is really quite extraordinary.

GREEN: Lou Ehrhart is a University of Central Florida researcher who has counted sea turtle nests in this refuge since the mid-’80s. He says the green turtle‘s recovery is especially astounding.

EHRHART: In those first three years, we had 30 or 40 green turtle nests, and the summer before last, we had 11,840. That’s just unheard of.

GREEN: Statewide, sea turtles are thriving. Nearly all of the nation’s sea turtle nests are here in Florida. Most credit the Endangered Species Act, which brought sea turtles under protection in 1978. Sea turtles don’t begin reproducing until their early 20s. That’s why researchers thinks their populations multiply every couple of decades and why we’re seeing a boom now.

Ehrhart also points to state protections of Florida beaches aimed at discouraging development and preserving them for nesting. This is important because while sea turtles can migrate thousands of miles, they almost always return to the same beach to nest.

Sea turtles still face many hurdles. In the United States, all sea turtles remain threatened or endangered. In the Pacific Ocean, leatherback populations are plunging. Back at the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, this nesting sea turtle is disappearing into the waves.

STAPLETON: Yeah, now she’s going faster.

GREEN: Oh, such relief for her to be floating and weightless again.

She might nest five more times during the summer, laying nearly a thousand eggs. But most baby sea turtles never reach adulthood because of predators and other dangers like dehydration under the sun. She never will know what becomes of them because sea turtles never come back to their nests.

Theatened Florida bats, new research


This video from the USA says about itself:

13 February 2014

Rehabilitating a Florida Bonneted Bat and getting it to temporarily adjust to new food. Apparently, rehab is boring… Florida Bonneted bats are a federally endangered species that only exist in Southern Florida and known population estmates only in the hundreds. Personnel in the video are rabies vaccinated. Never attempt to handle a bat or other wildlife. Video shot by Dustin Smith.

From Associated Press:

Singing bats; scientists lift veil on endangered FL species

By JENNY STALETOVICH, Miami Herald | June 20, 2015 | Updated: June 20, 2015 12:19am

MIAMI (AP) — The mysterious Florida bonneted bat, a creature so elusive that biologists know of only one roost in the wild, is actually a chatterbox, far easier to hear than see.

And for that information we can thank citizen scientists. Over the past year, they recorded thousands of calls, erected bat boxes and scoured the county to paint a new picture of the under-appreciated bats and lift the veil on one of the state’s most critically endangered species.

Props also go to chance, for putting the bats within earshot of a cutting-edge bat researcher having a glass of wine in her backyard.

“Who would have thought?” said volunteer Alfonso Perez, an attorney helping create a nonprofit to support more research. “If we just sit back and smell the roses, there’s a lot of things going on.”

All the attention has generated some star treatment for the bats: their own Facebook page, parties and a corporate sponsor. Much of that can be credited to biologist Kirsten Bohn, an expert in bat songs, who began organizing outings — part party and part expedition — to collect data on the enigmatic bat, which has dwindled to a South Florida population numbering in the hundreds.

With their iPads and smart phones programmed to pick up high-frequency chirps, volunteers trained by Bohn located the first roost ever documented in Southeast Florida near the Gables Granada Golf Course in September. Her team also recorded more than 20,000 calls, providing a trove of new data that shows the pug-nosed bats feed and sing like no other bat in the United States, in a range much larger than previously suspected.

Earlier this month, Zoo Miami wildlife veterinarian Frank Ridgely released the first bat raised from infancy. If all goes well, a tracker attached to the bat could let Ridgely observe its behavior in the wild.

All this new research could ultimately help federal wildlife managers now considering conservation plans for the bat. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which added the bat to the endangered species list in 2013 — the first bat in 25 years — is expected to propose a critical habitat by the end of the year and ask for input from the public and experts.

Habitat protocols could help avoid potential problems like the scene now playing out at the Granada course, where Coral Gables launched extensive restoration work last month that includes trimming trees and removing grass without contacting federal officials. The city’s chief of landscaping, Brook Dannemiller, said the project manager checked with state officials, who signed off on the project, leading the city to believe the work would cause no harm.

But Bohn, who alerted federal agents, worries that bats with pups could roost in the trees. Stripping the grass could also affect the bugs they eat. On Friday, Service spokesman Ken Warren said the agency is looking into the matter.

If the bats are to survive, Ridgely said more aggressive steps must be taken to protect them, including surveying parks throughout the county that could take the place of lost habitat.

“The forest is never coming back in most of Miami-Dade County,” he said.

Conservation of bats has become more urgent in recent years with the spread of White Nose Syndrome, a fatal fungus, and a rise in wind turbines. Up to two million bats die each year, threatening a critical link in America’s food production. Some bats pollinate plants — imagine a world without mangoes, avocados and guava. Others, including the bonneted bat, consume massive amounts of insects that farmers, and mosquito control districts, would otherwise battle.

Florida’s bonneted bats, which are not known to contract White Nose and risk little injury from turbines, face bigger risks from pesticides and habitat loss. Because they are large and fly high, the bats need plenty of room to maneuver. Their perilously low numbers could indicate just how little open space remains in South Florida.

“Bonneted bats are like a bullet or a jet airplane,” Ridgely said. “They are built for speed and go in a straight line.”

That behavior also makes them hard to study. Try spotting a bullet 30 to 40 feet high in the air. In the dark.

Bohn knew little about Florida’s bonneted bats, officially Eumops floridanus, when she arrived in Florida after studying in Texas and traveling largely in South America to record free-tailed bats for her research on communication. In 2014, she helped author a pioneering study that used mathematical equations to first document bat singing.

In the study, scientists used the calls of several species, including free-tailed bats, Carolina chickadees, orangutans and pilot whales. For a human sample, they recorded a reading of Hamlet. It turns out the clicks and chirps that can sound like change jingling in your pocket are more like a chorus of songbirds.

Bats, the study found, don’t just chirp to get their bearings or find food, they also sing to flirt, fend off other males and call to their young. They sing from their nests and they sing when they fly. Like humans, they may have a language.

To hear most bats, calls need to be amplified using a microphone. But the bigger, lower frequency bonneted bat can usually be heard by most people, though not all. “Too many Mötley Crüe concerts,” said Ridgely, who can’t hear the calls without a microphone.

To study the bonneted bats, Bohn, who recently left Florida International University for Johns Hopkins University, first erected recorders on the Granada golf course. Amazed at the volume of calls, she began installing song meters around the county in large open areas where bats might forage — at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, the Deering Estate and along the Ludlam Trail. The bats historically lived in pine rockland, where the sparse pine canopy let them cruise unimpeded. But with most rockland now gone — less than 2 percent of the historic range outside Everglades National Park remains — the bats adapted to become urban bats foraging in whatever open space they could find, like the parking lot around Zoo Miami.

Among Florida researchers, the Granada Golf Course was a well-known feeding ground. For Bohn, a move to the neighborhood in 2012 was serendipitous.

Within weeks, Bohn heard their songs, began recording them and recruited grad student Giselle Hosein. When neighbors read about their work in the Miami Herald, they contacted Bohn, who formed the Bat Squad to help collect data. At their first bat night at the golf course, Bacardi — the brand’s logo includes a bat — provided free rum as hundreds wandered around the darkened course or sat in lawn chairs gazing into the night sky.

“This is so up my alley,” said Ken Willis, who attended another bat night in May. “We know so little about them and they’re here. The bats. The foxes. They were here before us and they’re here amongst us.”

In the past year, Bohn and volunteer grad students analyzed about 25,000 calls and logged the comings and goings of bats from the roost — first reported in the 1980s but not confirmed until Bohn and Ridgely studied it — in the eaves of a house a block away on Alhambra Circle.

The data helped paint a new picture of the urban bats. Bohn found the bats call at a much lower frequency and over bigger distances than Brazilian free-tailed bats, another species plentiful in South Florida. That discovery alone, Bohn wrote in a memo to federal officials, could make a critical difference in how bats are surveyed, because it makes them far easier to identify if microphones are set at the right frequency and correctly placed.

“Basically using acoustic monitoring is the best way to go,” Bohn said. “You can have a Eumops flying by and I’ll pick that bugger up.”

Bohn picked up their calls “all over (southern) Miami-Dade County, but in very low numbers,” she said, suggesting the long-lived bats travel farther to forage than previously suspected.

Bohn also found the bats roosting and feeding in Coral Gables were sensitive to temperature, emerging from their roosts only on warm nights. Surveying during colder months, she said, could give inaccurate information.

Without funding, Bohn was unable to complete more thorough research. “I could write a 20-page paper, but I’m doing this on a volunteer basis,” she said.

In an email from Honduras Saturday, she was optimistic that volunteers would carry on, organizing bat watches and installing boxes to provide more data so she could continue her research.

So far, Bohn’s acoustic findings could help define hotspots like the Granada Golf Course, said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Paula Halupa. But Halupa said findings on roosting patterns would need more research.

“If we can focus on areas where we know they’re at and the surrounding areas, we can minimize the risks to the species,” she said. “So it’s all good stuff.”

Halupa said she was not surprised by the extent of the bat’s range: “A lot of times people don’t find bats because they don’t take the time to look. It’s not easy work.”

The intense public interest came as a pleasant surprise.

“It’s awesome that people in their own backyards … can see this and have enough interest to collect data,” she said. “Our agencies are too small and too overwhelmed with day-to-day crises and we need to rely more on citizen scientists.”

 

 

 

Save Florida corals


This video from the USA says about itself:

Coral Restoration Foundation, Planting staghorn corals

5 October 2013

Ken Nedimyer talks about the Coral Restoration Foundation’s coral nursery and how they plant staghorn corals on the reefs of Key Largo, Florida.

From Wildlife Extra:

1,600 Corals planted at Florida Keys Plantapalooza

To celebrate World Oceans Day divers from the Florida Keys-based Coral Restoration Foundation has planted 1,600 corals in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Some 70 divers sowed corals at six Upper Keys sites including Molasses Reef, Carysfort Reef, Grecian Rocks, Little Conch Reef, Snapper Ledge and Pickles Reef.

“It’s really important to get the corals out there in large amounts, but it’s also important because we’re involving a lot of the community,” said Kayla Ripple, the Coral Restoration Foundation’s coral nursery programme manager.

Staghorn corals are threatened, but Coral Restoration Foundation has had good success in cultivating and planting new staghorns where the species has died.

The small coral fragments were grown in a designated nursery about three miles from the Keys. The infant corals, about three inches long, are hung on a framework of PVC pipe resembling a tree to develop. After nine months, the staghorns typically reach the size of a dinner plate and are transported to offshore reefs where they are affixed to the sea floor with epoxy.

Since Coral Reef Foundation’s launch in 2000 the organisation has planted some 31,500 corals on upper and middle Keys reefs, however this is the organisation’s most prolific output in a single day.