Dutch anti-Semitic football supporters


This video about Hitler´s Holocaust is called Auschwitz Birkenau – Warning Extremely Graphic Content.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Dutch police investigate ‘burn the Jews‘ anti-Semitic chants at FC Utrec[h]t vs Ajax football match

The match in the highest tier of Dutch football was marred by videos showing fans chanting anti-Semitic slogans, and the football association, police and even justice minister are investigating

Adam Whitnall

Tuesday 07 April 2015

Dutch police are investigating reports of football fans chanting anti-Semitic slogans including calls for Jews to be burned and sent “to the gas chambers” during a match at the weekend.

Videos have emerged online from FC Utrecht’s 1-1 draw with Ajax in which a group of fans can clearly be heard shouting the anti-Semitic songs and clapping.

According to Dutch media reports, the chants went on for several minutes and included a common refrain of: “Hamas, Hamas, Jews to the gas.”

Another chant, which was apparently filmed by someone in the stands and posted to YouTube, declared: “My father was in the commandos, my mother was in the SS, together they burned Jews, because Jews burn the best.”

The Dutch football association, the KNVB, has denounced the chants as “reprehensible and disgusting” and said it was currently investigating.

The incident, during the Eredivisie match at midday on Sunday, has received widespread coverage in the Dutch news media after the discovery of the video. …

According to the daily newspaper Het Parool, the “SS” chant appeared to come from the hardcore section of FC Utrecht fans housed in the section of the Galgenwaard Stadium known as the Bunnikside. …

Ajax is regularly the target for anti-Semitic chants because of the historical presence of a Jewish community in Amsterdam, according to the Jerusalem Post.

Rupert Murdoch’s media played a dubious role in this once again. According to the Parool report, FOX Sports TV commentator Mark van Rijswijk commented, while Utrecht supporters shouted, audible clearly, “Hamas, Hamas, Jews to the gas” that the Utrecht supporters ´really backed their team´.

Russian Premier League team Torpedo Moscow were yesterday forced to play two home games in an empty stadium after fans displayed a banner with a nazi symbol, the club’s fourth racism-related punishment this season: here.

Punk music police censorship in English football


This music video from Britain is called Sex Pistols – Anarchy In The UK 1976.

By poet Attila the Stockbroker in England:

Anarchy in the UK – but censorship in Gillingham

Thursday 5th March 2015

Now my autobiography is finished the gigs are beginning to start again. Today my wife and I are off to Lerwick for my first ever appearances in Shetland – hooray! Looking forward to that, and to sampling the ale from the legendary Valhalla Brewery — an extended report of proceedings will be in my next column.

And I had a brilliant show last Sunday at the Winter of Discontent punk festival in north London with Sunderland heroes and old mates Angelic Upstarts, Welsh anti-fascist legends The Oppressed and Edinburgh’s hilarious Oi Polloi.

Now a bit more from the book.

To set the scene — it’s 1997 and the crisis at my beloved Brighton & Hove Albion is at its height. Our Goldstone Ground has been sold to property speculators, we’re playing our “home” games at Gillingham, a round trip of 140 miles, and we’re second from bottom of the entire Football League.

To try and liven things up a bit, I’ve persuaded club chairman Dick Knight to let me be PA announcer and DJ, playing punk, reggae and ska. It’s Boxing Day 1997, at home to Colchester. A noon kick-off.

We’d obviously had to set off really early to get to Gillingham in time for the game and everyone was a bit bleary-eyed. So, for the first time, I decided to play Anarchy in the UK by the Sex Pistols. It had been on for about a minute when a policeman burst into the box.

“Take that off! Take that off! Now!”

“Why?’”I asked. But I could see that he was really angry. So I did, and put the Clash on instead.

This music video from England is called The Clash – Janie Jones (live at the Belle Vue, Manchester, UK 15. November 1977).

“You can’t play that record at a football match. It’s banned. It’s on THE LIST!”

“What list?” I asked. “No-one has ever told me there was a list of records I couldn’t play!”

“Well, it’s obvious, isn’t it!’ he shouted. “It’s obvious!”

I stood there, the Clash playing in the background, perplexed. It evidently wasn’t “obvious” to me and the fact that he needed to explain further made him even more angry. “It incites violence in the crowd!” he exclaimed.

I thought for a few seconds. “Well, officer,” I said. “I bought two copies of Anarchy in the UK in the black sleeve on EMI Records on the day that it came out in 1976. I have played it and heard it many, many times since and not once has doing so given me violent thoughts of any kind whatsoever.

“I have also been to all 92 Football League grounds and every time I have heard In the Air Tonight by Phil Collins I have had to restrain myself from committing serious acts of criminal damage!”

He didn’t get the joke and, a couple of days later, Brighton & Hove Albion FC received a formal letter from Kent Police banning me from doing the PA at Gillingham any longer.

Dick Knight phoned me up. “I’m not having that, John!” He spoke to them and the ban was rescinded, on condition that I didn’t play Anarchy in the UK again. So I didn’t.

This music video is called The Damned – Smash it Up; Old Grey Whistle Test.

I did play Smash it Up by the Damned and I Fought the Law and White Riot by the Clash in the next couple of weeks though. No policeman appeared in the box. Obviously those three weren’t on THE LIST.

This music video is called The Clash – I Fought The Law (Live at The London Lyceum Theatre – 1979).

This music video is called The Clash – White Riot.

Football and racism in Britain


This 2010 video is called Kick It Out of Football – Racism.

By Kadeem Simmonds in Britain:

SIMMONDS SPEAKS: Did people really think racism disappeared?

Wednesday 25th February 2015

Football still has a problem and it never went away, says KADEEM SIMMONDS

As fans filled in to Stamford Bridge last Saturday for the match against Burnley, a video was played on the big screen. It was an anti-racism clip that had to be shown as a reminder that racism will not be tolerated at the club.

It followed the racist attack on French-Mauritian Souleymane S in Paris a fortnight ago.

As Souleymane attempted to board a Paris Metro train on his way home from work, a group of Chelsea supporters — in France for that night’s Champions League tie against Paris St Germain — shoved him off and chanted: “We’re racist, we’re racist and that’s the way we like it.”

A nation-wide hunt for the supporters began the following morning and by the weekend a few of them had been named and shamed, including Richard Barklie, an ex-Royal Ulster Constabulary and Police Service of Northern Ireland officer and currently a director at human organisation the World Human Rights Forum.

The World Human Rights Forum should be careful that Mr Barklie’s behaviour will not make them look as fake as the Qatari dictorial government-founded Qatari National Human Rights Committee, or the Afghan (so called) Independent Human Rights Commission.

Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho used his Friday press conference to say he was “ashamed,” while owner Roman Abramovich was “disgusted” and offered Souleymane a ticket to the second leg of the match at Stamford Bridge.

Souleymane turned down the offer and who could blame him? He isn’t a fan of the sport and after what happened to him, why would he want to spend an evening with Chelsea supporters?

The whole incident has brought racism back to the forefront of the game but it has always been there.

If the public thought racism had left football before the attack in Paris a fortnight ago they are wrong.

You only have to look at the comments Stan Collymore gets when he tweets or what other black players are called on social media.

If what happened to Souleymane wasn’t caught on video no-one would have known about it. It may be cynical of me but there is probably evidence of racism up and down the country at football grounds every weekend.

Following Sunday’s 2-2 draw between Tottenham and West Ham a video was uploaded of alleged West Ham fans chanting vile anti-semitic chants and called Spurs fans “fucking Jews.”

The fact that an organisation like Kick It Out is still around shows that the problem is one that needs to be addressed.

I don’t want everyone working there to be out of a job but it would be great if football didn’t need a group to stamp racism out of the game.

But it does because the Football Association, Fifa and Uefa are not taking the problem seriously enough and when they say they do it’s a bold face lie.

The next World Cup is being held in Russia, where the fans are notorously racist and there have been cases this season of fans of Russian teams competing in the season’s Champions League acting in a racist manner, forcing the teams to play their matches behind closed doors.

But has Fifa stripped them of the World Cup? Of course not.

Were they to be kicked out of the tournament until they cleaned up their racism problem, it would send a clear message that it will no longer be tolerated.

But let’s not ignore the fact that Britain needs to stop pointing the finger at other countries’ racist supporters and attempt to sort out its own fans.

Black players are not hounded and villified as badly as they were a few decades ago but there has been more than one occasion over the past few seasons where black players have scored in the Premier League and fans have made monkey gestures.

For too long the FA has acted like it sorted out the racism on the terraces but it hasn’t. Small pockets of fans continue to behave in a racist manner, proving it is still well and truly alive.

Alyson Rudd from The Times and the FA have patted themselves on the back over the past few days and tried to act like this “incident” shows how far football has come. But it is has not come far enough in my opinion.

And as for Chelsea. While they can act disgusted and condemn the racist attackers, that wasn’t the club’s stance in 2012 when captain John Terry was banned for racially abusing Anton Ferdinand.

Twitter was awash with jokes after the incident, most along the lines of Chelsea had banned three suporters for racist language and handed a fourth a new contract and made him captain.

While this is no laughing matter, the London side are made to look like a joke considering the way they have handled issues of racism in the past.

I find it difficult to watch Chelsea continue to be applauded for the way they are handling this case when they dealt with the Terry one so appallingly.

They allowed the former England defender to continue playing which basically sent out the message: “Racism is wrong unless you’re a good player and we need you, in which case we will sweep it under the carpet and hope it never gets brought up again.”

Queens Park Rangers’ caretaker boss Chris Ramsey put it best yesterday when he said:“Racism in football has been parked, not eliminated.”

THE British Transport Police (BTP) yesterday released pictures of seven men in relation to racist chanting a day after Souleymane S was shoved off the Paris Metro in France. The men, believed to be Chelsea fans, were allegedly chanting racist songs at St Pancras International station in London: here.

Chelsea were pleading with their fans yesterday to keep the atmosphere at Wembley “positive” with worries that there could be anti-semitic chanting at the League Cup final. With Tottenham’s links to London’s Jewish community and Blues fans in the past chanting anti-semitic songs — something the club have admitted — the Blues are reminding fans of the responsibility they have to the club: here.

RACISM is widespread in English football with police having to deal with hundreds of incidents from the top of the game right down to grassroots level, new research revealed yesterday: here.

British football fans against racism


Lutz Bachmann, leader of Pegida posing as Adolf Hitler, and his role model

This photo shows Lutz Bachmann, leader of the racist Pegida organisation in Germany, posing as Adolf Hitler, and his role model, the fuehrer of nazi Germany, 1933-1945.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Newcastle fans call for ban on Pegida UK rally

Friday 20th february 2014

NEWCASTLE United fans urged fellow supporters yesterday to demand a ban on far-right activists who are hoping to copy German racists with a “Pegida UK” demonstration on February 28.

Dozens of unions, anti-fascist and religious groups and politicians have already backed a counter-protest to snuff out attempts at building a new British fascist movement.

Now Toon fans, who will mass hours later for a scheduled home game versus Aston Villa, have added their opposition to the plans.

Branding Newcastle a “wonderfully diverse and glorious city,” supporters group NUFC Fans United urges: “The authorities cannot allow any of our community, whatever their race, creed or religious belief to be treated in such a manner in our city on match day or any other day.

“What kind of message is such a rally sending to players such as Papiss Cisse, Mehdi Abeid, Cheik Tiote and Moussa Sissoko as well as to our wider Muslim community?

“What kind of message does it send to those who come to study in our colleges and universities, or who visit as tourists to wonder on the splendour of our heritage history?”

The group urges “like-minded football supporters” to demand a ban on the event, adding: “This rally is unacceptable, uncalled for and not welcome on the streets of Newcastle.”

Pegida UK has adopted the name of an anti-Islamic movement that mobilised thousands in Germany before an “Adolf Hitler” photo of its nazi-loving leader surfaced, plunging it into chaos.

See also here.

The anti-Islamic group Pegida has been warned it is “not welcome” in Newcastle ahead of its inaugural UK protest this weekend: here.

ANTI-FASCISTS will be out in force in Newcastle today to fight back against the first ever demonstration by German Islamophobic group Pegida on Britain’s streets: here.