Friesland moth atlas now on the Internet


This video from Chicago in the USA says about itself:

Moths vs Butterflies

9 October 2013

Wherein we explore the order Lepidoptera!

Huge thanks to Jim Boone, collection manager of insects for making this episode possible. Check out his episode from the Chicago Adventure series!

Translated from the Dutch Butterfly Foundation:

Monday, March 30th, 2015

In Friesland for many years already there has been attention for moths. The regional Butterfly Working Group has been working for years at an overview of the Frisian moths. Now the provisional Atlas of the macro-moths is available digitally. In this atlas you can find distribution maps of all 674 (!) species known from the province. …

For those interested, the digital atlas is available by clicking on this link. Due to the size of the file (288 MB), it takes a while before it is loaded.

Japanese midges in Dutch sea water


Telmatogeton japonicus larva, photo by Floris Bennema

Translated from the Dutch Stichting ANEMOON marine biologists:

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

The marine splash midge Telmatogeton japonicus is found since 1963 in the Northwest European coastal waters. This insect, which is native to the area of Japan and Hawaii is a discreet but certainly interesting newcomer to our shores. Interesting, because the larvae live in our brackish and saline water. Precisely in that environment we see only very rarely and very few species of insects. Locally, on eg, buoys and wind turbines in the North Sea, this species has established itself massively.

Bumblebee queen on flowers and at nest, video


This video shows a large earth bumblebee queen on crocus flowers and at work at her underground nest in the Netherlands.

Butterflies re-emerging in Dutch spring


This video is called Astonishing European Butterflies and Moths.

Translated from the Dutch butterfly foundation today:

Most of the butterflies that in recent weeks have been reported to Waarneming.nl and Telmee had wintered as butterflies and have emerged on the first sunny spring days. The brimstone is the most reported species (2000), followed by small tortoiseshell (1700), peacock butterfly (330), red admiral (290) and comma (180).

And now, species which had wintered while in the pupa stage have started emerging as well.

Australian stick insect, Mexican butterfly in botanical garden


Giant prickly stick insect, 22 March 2015

22 March 2015. To the botanical garden. On a smallish Eucalyptus tree in a pot in a hothouse, this adult giant prickly stick insect from Australia.

Before we had arrived at the garden, a song thrush sang from the top of a tree near a parking lot.

In the botanical garden, ring-necked parakeets flying and calling.

In the Victoria amazonica hothouse, we saw this gold-edged owl-butterfly. It was an old individual, with damaged wings.

Caligo uranus, 22 March 2015

First, we saw the upper side of its wings.

Caligo uranus, lower side, 22 March 2015

Then, the lower side.

Outside, bees had discovered the spring flowers.

Bumblebee on crocus, video


This video shows a bumblebee on crocus flowers, early this spring.

15-year-old Jessica den Bol from the Netherlands made the video.