Rare pink grasshopper photographed


Pink grasshopper in Hoofddorp, photo by Suzanne Wieringh

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Rare pink grasshopper spotted in Hoofddorp

Today, 15:21

It’s unlikely that you will ever really see one, but it happened to Suzanne Wieringh in Hoofddorp: she spotted a pink grasshopper. The rare animal was in her garden.

Suzanne wanted to pick up her daughter’s shoe when she saw something that was pinkish. “At first I thought it was a rose petal, but then it started to jump,” she says to the regional broadcasting organisation of North Holland.

A professor of entomology at Wageningen University explains that the phenomenon is known among biologists as erythrism. This is a deviation which is similar to albinism, only erythrism causes a reddish color instead of white.

It is difficult to determine how many pink grasshoppers are born. These grasshoppers quickly fall prey to predators because of their poor camouflage.

New bug species discovered on Texel island


This video shows a Rhopalus subrufus bug.

Today, warden Jitske Esselaar on Texel in the Netherlands reports on research about bugs on the island in 2015.

Four species, new for Texel, were found: Hesperocorixa castanea, an aquatic species discovered in a pond.

Liorhyssus hyalinus is a land species. It had been found earlier on Schiermonnikoog, Terschelling and Vlieland islands.

Compsidolon salicellum was found in a forest; a first for all Wadden Sea islands.

Finding Rhopalus subrufus was also a first for the Wadden islands.

Bee and mites, video


This video shows a male red mason bee. He has many mites on his back. During mating, the mites will transfer to the female bee; in order to land in the nest, where they will eat waste.

Jelle Talsma in the Netherlands made this video.

A thousand mosquitoes dancing


This 17 May 2016 video shows very many nonbiting midges dancing. As their name says, they don’t bite.

Robert Hartog from the Netherlands made this video.

European hornet queen in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

7 May 2016

Giant European Hornet Queen searching for a nest site in early May on the deck. She seems to be partial to a bird house to begin laying eggs for a new colony that will last until Fall.

The Giant or European hornet was introduced into the New York area in the 1850s. It is the only true hornet in North America. Since its introduction, the European hornet has spread throughout most of the eastern United States. In nature, European hornets are beneficial because the feed on many insect pests.

Read more here.