Singing robins, eight hours video

This video from Britain says about itself:

8 HOURS ● Bird Song & Sounds ● BEAUTIFUL Video of Robin Birds Singing & Chirping

Filmed in 2016

Video Produced by Paul Dinning – Wildlife in Cornwall

Crabs, oyster, fish video

This video from the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

Oct 25, 2016

While one shore crab creeps into the Pacific oyster to push it open with its back two others get away with the loot. The sand gobies swim curiously around it. Filmed by Mirjam van der Sanden.

British homophobe ‘donkeyphobe’ running for UKIP leadership

This video from Britain says about itself:

Ukip hopeful John Rees-Evans on the ‘gay donkey’ who tried to ‘rape’ his horse

24 October 2016

After a Polish right-wing politicians attacked a ‘gay’ elephant and the fictional bear Winnie the Pooh, now a British right-wing politician attacking a ‘gay’ donkey.

By Conrad Landin in Britain:

Ukip politician who claimed gay donkey raped his horse stands for leader

Tuesday 25th October 2016

A UKIP politician who once claimed that “a homosexual donkey raped my horse” announced his intention to seek his party’s leadership yesterday.

John Rees-Evans said he was standing for the top job because “significant changes to the culture of politics in Britain are long overdue.”

But the former parliamentary candidate immediately faced questions about embarrassing comments exclusively exposed by the Morning Star in December 2014.

Then standing in the Welsh valley seat of Cardiff South and Penarth, Mr Rees-Evans was one of a clutch of Ukip activists who confronted anti-racist protesters outside the party’s Merthyr Tydfil offices.

He was asked to explain comments made by other Ukip activists, including former Ukip branch chair Julia Gasper’s remark that “some homosexuals prefer sex with animals.”

Mr Rees-Evans responded: “Actually I’ve witnessed that … a homosexual donkey raped my horse.

“I was personally quite amazed, I’ve got a horse, it was in the fields … a donkey came up which is male and, I’m afraid, tried to rape my horse.”

When contacted by the Star at the time, Mr Rees-Evans defended the remarks …

But he appeared to be frustrated when he was quizzed about the incident on BBC2’s Daily Politics programme yesterday.

“It was a bit of playful banter with a mischievous activist,” he said. “I’m sorry if I offended anyone in doing that.

“I concede it was a mistake to be playful with an activist in a street. The fact is I’m not a politician. The guy was just asking me questions in the street. It was an error of judgement.”

Mr Rees-Evans, an ex-soldier who migrated to Bulgaria but says he moved back to Wales before last year’s general election, also disputed reports he carried a handgun in Ikea to fend off terrorists.

A Vice News article also reported that his planned “fortress” in the country would incorporate a church, a leisure complex, an underground bunker, a firing range, and a panic room and a watchtower.

His opponents in the race include MEP Suzanne Evans, deputy leader Paul Nuttall and “alt-right” activist Raheem Kassam.

Earlier this year, Mr Kassam tweeted: “Can someone just like … tape Nicola Sturgeon’s mouth shut? And her legs, so she can’t reproduce. Thanks.”

Bittern on video

This 25 October 2016 video shows a bittern in the Netherlands.

Theo Las made the video.

Assyrians in Syria, archaeological research

Tell Sabi Abyad in Syria

From Leiden University:

Assyrians were more ‘homely’ than we thought

20 October 2016

Archaeologist Victor Klinkenberg examined an old Assyrian settlement in Syria, near to the IS [ISIS] stronghold Raqqa. ‘Social life was more important than military life.’ PhD defence 27 October.

The Assyrian Empire (ca. 2000 to 609 BC) was highly successful. At its height, it stretched from Turkey to Egypt and the Persian Gulf. Historians have wondered for a long time how the Assyrians were able to maintain power over such a huge region.

Tell Sabi Abyad

Research by PhD candidate Victor Klinkenberg has now provided an answer to part of this question. He has shown that Assyrian dominance was by no means always secured by using violence and brute force. Klinkenberg drew this conclusion after studying the settlement at Tell Sabi Abyad in present-day northern Syria. ‘This village was inhabited around 1200 BC,’ Klinkenberg explained. ‘The Assyrians founded the settlement when they conquered the region, so you’d expect it to be mainly a military outpost, ruled from above. But that doesn’t seem to be the case.’

Positive stimuli

Kinkenberg found that the rooms and houses of Tell Sabi Abyad had many different functions, and that they changed frequently. At one time it was a café where visitors drank beer, and at another time it was a rubbish tip. Klinkenberg: ‘All this shows that social life played a much greater role than military life. Apparently, positive stimuli and local stability were important factors in the Assyrians’ imperial activities.’

Islamic State

Klinkenberg’s research is part of a larger project headed by lecturer Bleda Düring, financed with a subsidy from the European Research Council (ERC). In recent years, the work of the Leiden researchers has been severely hindered by the rise of the Islamic State [ISIS] terror movement. Tell Sabi Abyad is around 80 km from Raqqa, the capital of the IS [ISIS]caliphate.


It was impossible for Klinkenberg to travel to the settlement. ‘In the past five years, nobody from our team has visited the excavations,’ he explained. ‘We did hear recently that a lot of archaeological finds have been destroyed or stolen. That’s such a waste, particularly as most of the remnants have no financial value. They’re worth absolutely nothing on the black market, but their value to science is enormous.’


Fortunately, all the earlier excavations at Tell Sabi Abyad have been carefully documented. ‘The project has been running for 35 years. The ground area is photographed every season; the location of the finds is mapped and buildings and rooms are measured. These measures meant that I could do my research at a distance.’ Like every other archaeologist, Klinkenberg would have preferred to visit the site in person. ‘But that’s a minor inconvenience compared to the suffering of the Syrian people.’

Beetle eats dead beetle, video

This 25 October 2016 video shows a Nicrophorus vespilloides burying beetle eating a dead dung beetle.

On the burying beetle’s head, mites travel along.

Christ Grootzwagers in the Netherlands made this video.