Fukushima, Greenpeace report


This 28 February 2018 video shows a Greenpeace report about the Fukushima nuclear disaster area in Japan.

Is Fukushima doomed to become a dumping ground for toxic waste? — The Guardian: here.

Clearing the radioactive rubble heap that was Fukushima Daiichi, 7 years on — Scientific American: here.

Advertisements

Fukushima radioactive water update


This video says about itself:

Thai authorities face criticism for importing fish from Fukushima

6 March 2018

Authorities have defended Thailand‘s importation of fish from Fukushima, the scene of a major nuclear accident and radioactive leak in 2011.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Thursday, March 8, 2018

£250m ‘ice wall’ doesn’t fully cut off radioactive water at Fukushima, say experts

NUCLEAR experts concluded today that a £250 million ice wall meant to contain radioactive water at the destroyed Fukushima Daiichi power station is only partially effective and that other measures were urgently needed.

The plant’s private operator Tepco says the ice wall has helped reduce the ever-growing amount of radioactive water by half. The plant also pumps out several times as much groundwater before it reaches the tsunami-damaged reactors.

The groundwater mixes with radioactive water leaking from the damaged reactors. Contaminated water also results from rainwater that comes in contact with tainted soil and structures at the plant.

Fukushima Daiichi suffered meltdowns of three reactors after an earthquake and tsunami on March 11 2011 in the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Investigators found that Tepco had not met basic safety requirements before the disaster.

The government-commissioned panel said additional measures need to be taken to minimise the inflow of rainwater and groundwater, such as repairing roofs and other damaged parts of buildings.

“We recognise that the ice wall has had an effect, but more work is needed to mitigate rainfall ahead of the typhoon season”, said panel chairman Yuzo Onishi, a Kansai University civil engineering professor.

The mile-long, coolant-filled underground structure was installed around the wrecked reactor buildings to create a frozen soil barrier to keep groundwater from flowing into the heavily radioactive area.

Tepco said today the amount of contaminated water that collects inside the reactor buildings was reduced to 95 tons per day with the ice wall, compared to nearly 200 tons without.

That is part of the 500 tons of contaminated water created every day at the plant, with the other 300 tons pumped out via wells, treated and stored in tanks.

In addition to the £250m construction cost paid by the government, the ice wall needs about £7m a year to be spent on maintenance and operation.

The plant has been struggling with the ever-growing amounts of water — only slightly contaminated after treatment — now totalling 1 million tons and stored in 1,000 tanks, taking up significant space at the complex, where a decades-long decommissioning effort continues.

Officials aim to minimise the contaminated water in the reactor before starting to remove melted fuel in 2021.

Fukushima disaster, Japan update


This 2016 video is called Fukushima Uncensored – BBC Documentary.

Seven Years After: Radioactive debris piling up at Fukushima interim facility — The Asahi Shimbun: here.

Workers are concerned about those matters that all blue-collar laborers worry about — pay and benefits — which isn’t to suggest they don’t think about the possible health risks of radiation exposure. Last October, Ikeda talked to the comedy duo-cum-nuclear power reporters Oshidori Mako & Ken on the web channel Jiyu-na Radio about potential false reports on radiation levels around Fukushima, although also touching on health issues that have not been reported by the mainstream media. His main point was that serious illnesses may not manifest themselves until years after workers quit the site and thus no longer qualify for worker’s compensation: here.

Fukushima disaster in Japan update


This video says about itself:

A New Source of Fukushima Radiation Was Just Found, Now What?

21 October 2017

Researchers found radioactive particles from Fukushima on beaches miles away, but how did it get there?

Japan wants Fukushima evacuees to go home. They’re not so sure. — The Christian Science Monitor: here.

Tokyo court orders Tepco to pay $10 million in damages over 2011 disaster — Reuters: here.

TOKYO — The decision Jan. 16 to automatically extend a nuclear agreement with the U.S. came as a relief to a Japanese government worried about the prospect of renegotiating the basis for a cornerstone of its energy policy. But friction remains over a massive store of plutonium that highlights the problems with the nation’s ambitious nuclear energy plans: here.

Korea, import radioactive Fukushima fish, WTO demands


This Associated Press video says about itself:

31 July 2015

South Korea is banning imports of all fishery products from Japan’s Fukushima region because of what it calls growing public worry over radiation-contaminated food that has reportedly prompted a sharp decline in fish consumption.

The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries said on Friday that it made the move because of Tokyo’s uncertain progress on stopping contaminated water from flowing into the ocean and worries about how the clean-up will advance.

“This measure is due to the public’s growing concerns regarding the fact that hundreds of tons of polluted water, coming from the recent accident scene of Fukushima nuclear disaster, is flowing into the sea everyday”, said government spokesman Shin Joong-don on Friday.

Seoul imposed a partial ban on Japanese fish following the March 2011 earthquake that led to the meltdown of a nuclear reactor in Fukushima.

The new measure now includes all fishery products from Fukushima and seven other nearby Japanese prefectures.

Japan has acknowledged that contaminated underground water has been flowing into the Pacific Ocean.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Saturday, February 24, 2018

WTO tells South Korea to allow in Japanese nuclear fish

SOUTH KOREA said today that it will appeal against a World Trade Organisation (WTO) decision against bans on imports of Japanese fishery products after the Fukushima nuclear meltdowns.

The government said it wanted to protect public health and safety and would maintain its existing regulations on imports of Japanese seafood.

Japan had complained to the WTO about South Korea’s ban, saying it violated WTO rules, was discriminatory and served as a trade barrier.

In 2013, South Korea banned imports of all fishery products from eight Japanese provinces near Fukushima after Tokyo Electric Power reported leaks of radiation-contaminated water.

That tightened restrictions already imposed after the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station in March 2011, when a tsunami wrecked the plant and caused its reactors to melt down.

It also required inspection certificates for food products from Japan if small amounts of radioactive cesium or iodine were detected.

China also bans seafood and other agricultural products from Fukushima and nine other prefectures, including Tokyo. It requires certificates on foods from the rest of Japan.

Japan nuclear news update


This 2011 CNN video from the USA says about itself:

15 March 2011

Dale Bridenbaugh quit his job at GE [General Electric] to protest the Mark 1 nuclear reactor design used at a damaged Japanese power plant.

Japan court bars restart of nuclear reactor shut after Fukushima — Bloomberg: here.

Government and utilities shaken by high court challenge to public trust in Japan’s nuclear authority — The Japan Times: here.

Japanese officials are trying to decide what to do with thousands of tons of radioactive water from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant: here.

High radiation levels are still limiting recovery work at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, a stark reality that reporters saw firsthand when they observed efforts to remove risk factors there: here.

To serve in the U.S. Armed Forces, you must meet certain health and fitness requirements: you must be fit to serve. But a healthy group of young service men and women – many in their 20s – have come down with serious health problems since serving on a humanitarian mission to Fukushima, Japan, following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that led to a nuclear meltdown of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TepCo) nuclear power plant: here.