Dutch building closed, fearing ‘Grenfell’ disaster

This Dutch TV video about London, England says about itself (translated):

7 November 2017

He has been living in a hotel room for about 3.5 months. In June Antonio Roncolato just managed to escape from the conflagration in the London Grenfell Tower, and now the authorities are unable to find a new home for him. With some 500 others, he has signed up to help with the investigation into the disaster, because he is full of questions about the cause of the fire.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Rotterdam University closes building for fear of Grenfell Tower

Adapted at 01:29

The Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences has closed a part of one of its buildings as a precaution. The university has commissioned investigation of the façade panels of all buildings after the fatal fire in Grenfell Tower in London last summer.

“This investigation revealed a doubt about the fire safety of the façade panels that are attached to the oldest part (building section C) of the Kralingse Zoom location”, writes the Hogeschool Rotterdam in a press release. “Based on these findings, the university has commissioned independent research.”

This initial investigation has shown that the façade panels of the building component do not meet the current standards of fire safety. According to the university of applied sciences, the certainty can not be given that the building component is sufficiently safe for students, employees and other users.

No risk

In June, 71 people were killed in the fire in London because the fire spread rapidly through the outside cladding. The Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences therefore does not want to take any risks and has the building undergo further inspection in the coming days.

UPDATE: the building was indeed not safe.


Painting, birds, sea and buildings in Katwijk

Jan Toorop, 17 September 2017

As I blogged before, on 17 September 2017 we arrived at the North Sea in Katwijk town in the Netherlands. As this photo shows, there, on a sand dune, is a reproduction of a painting by artist Jan Toorop (1858–1928). Of Dutch-Indonesian ancestry, he lived some of his life in Katwijk.

Jan Toorop, bomschuit ship, 17 September 2017

This 1890 painting shows a ‘bomschuit‘ type ship on the beach of Katwijk. Fishermen and horses had to drag the ship out of the sea, or back into the sea; as Katwijk has no seaport.

A bit further was more art reminding people of fishing, traditionally the main industry in Katwijk aan Zee village.

Katwijk aan Zee, monument, 17 September 2017

A metal sculpture commemorates the over a hundred Katwijk fishermen who died at sea from 1919-2000, mentioning their names and ages.

Katwijk aan Zee, monument poem, 17 September 2017

The poem on the monument says (translated): Went to sea to have daily bread/Not knowing about the ends of their lives/This death did not grant farewells to loved ones/Only the names and memories stayed.

So, after the 1900 theatre play Op Hoop van Zegen by Herman Heijermans, which exposed unscrupulous shipowners and workplace deaths, and increased pressure for improvements, fishing was still a dangerous job. And it still is in this 21st century: in front of the metal monument were four stones commemorating four Katwijk fishermen casualties from 2005, 2006 and 2007.

Katwijk aan Zee, lamppost, 17 September 2017

A lamppost which used to be a ship’s mast.

Katwijk aan Zee, bird migration counting point, 17 September 2017

We arrived at the bird migration counting point, with pictures of various bird species which pass here. Meanwhile, barn swallows flying south on their autumn migration. So did meadow pipits.

A jackdaw and two migrating northern wheatears on the ground close to us. Unfortunately, no people counting birds present.

Sea holly growing. The flowers are gone already.

We continue to the mouth of the Old Rhine river. A carrion crow. A ringed plover on a rock.

Katwijk aan Zee, on 17 September 2017

Then, we walk south along the beach.

Katwijk aan Zee, church, 17 September 2017

We pass the old Saint Andrew’s church and its tower.

Katwijk aan Zee, church, on 17 September 2017

Finally, we are on the part of the beach south of Katwijk, and go inland to the sand dunes. Stay tuned!

Ancient Roman houses and Greek rock partridge

Glassware, 26 August 2017

On 26 August 2017, we went to the Casa Romana exhibition in the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden, the Netherlands. This photo shows glassware at the exhibition. Like the other photo in this blog post, it is a cell phone photo.

The exhibition is until 17 September. The museum writes about it:

Casa Romana provides a surprising introduction to the rich life of the residents of a fashionable Roman town villa. Visitors can look around the villa’s sumptuous interior, following the Romans’ everyday life from morning rituals to bedroom secrets. Countless objects from the museum collection have been incorporated into the rooms furnished for this exhibition, such as a dinner service, glassware, oil lamps, and portrait busts.

Mix of archaeology and modern design

In Casa Romana we see a blend of ancient archaeology and modern design by Studio Job, Tjep., and the garden architect Piet Oudolf, among others, as well as work by artists including Ruud van Empel, Gerd Rohling, Olivier van Herpt, and Teun van Staveren. There is also plenty to delight devotees of architecture. In total, over eight hundred objects are on display: dinner services, delicate glassware, mosaics, marble portrait busts and architectural fragments, jewellery, a silver table leg, roof tiles, children’s toys, and hundreds of small Roman oil lamps.

Interior of a Roman villa

The exhibition shows a sequence of twelve scenes from the private life of a couple from the highest echelons of Roman society and their family. You can follow their fascinating story in an audio tour, written by Brenda Meuleman, the author of the recent novel Het verraad van Julia (‘Julia’s betrayal’). The interiors that go with each stage of the story fully capture the lavishness of Roman villas, with their colourful frescoes and mosaic floors. They were composed using frescoes, film images, and art based on Roman antiquity.

Objects: a mix of items from the museum’s own collection and loans from elsewhere

Most of the Roman objects come from the National Museum of Antiquities’ own collection. They are joined by loans from numerous designers, artists, and antiquarians, as well as from the Royal Collections (The Hague), Museum Boijmans van Beuningen (Rotterdam), the Kröller-Müller Museum (Otterlo), and the Allard Pierson Museum (Amsterdam). The guest curators of this exhibition are the archaeologist and independent researcher Dr Gemma Jansen and Professor Eric M. Moormann and Dr Stephan T.A.M. Mols (the latter both of Radboud University, Nijmegen).

As we were in the museum anyway, we had a look at ancient Greek sculpture.

Rock partidge, 26 August 2017

Including this oil flask in the shape of a rock partridge, from Corinth, about 500-480 BCE.

Grenfell Tower flammable cladding also in Germany

This 22 June 2017 video from Britain is called Cladding Removed For Testing On Three Barnet council high rises.

Another video from Britain used to say about itself:

Krishnan Guru-Murthy Challenges Former Tory [Conservative] Minister Over 74 Falsified Building Fire Inspections

26 June 2017

Former Tory Party Housing and Fire Minister Brandon Lewis is challenged by Krishnan Guru-Murthy over his record with at least 74 tower buildings failing safety standards that were passed as safe when he was minister.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Inhabitants of flat in Wuppertal moved out due to flammable façade cladding

Today, 18:08

In the German city of Wuppertal people are moved out of a building. The façade of the building is of the same material as at Grenfell Tower in London, which completely burnt out two weeks ago.

After the fire in the tower block, which killed at least 79 people, all apartment buildings in Germany are being checked. The evacuation in Wuppertal is the first result of this.

What The Grenfell Fire Could Teach Trump. The Trump administration has been loosening health and safety regulations since Day One. By Dave Jamieson, Arthur Delaney in the USA.