Australian dinosaur tracks, world’s most diverse


This 27 March 2017 video is called Dinosaur tracks found at ‘Australia’s Jurassic Park‘ in Walmadany.

From the University of Queensland in Australia:

‘Australia’s Jurassic Park’ the world’s most diverse

March 27, 2017

Summary: An unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometer stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed ‘Australia’s Jurassic Park.’ A team of paleontologists has unveiled the most diverse assemblage of dinosaur tracks in the world in 127 to 140 million-year-old rocks in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia.

An unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometre stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed “Australia’s Jurassic Park.”

A team of palaeontologists from The University of Queensland’s School of Biological Sciences and James Cook University‘s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences braved sharks, crocodiles, massive tides and the threat of development to unveil the most diverse assemblage of dinosaur tracks in the world in 127 to 140 million-year-old rocks in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia.

Lead author Dr Steve Salisbury said the diversity of the tracks around Walmadany (James Price Point) was globally unparalleled and made the area the “Cretaceous equivalent of the Serengeti.”

“It is extremely significant, forming the primary record of non-avian dinosaurs in the western half the continent and providing the only glimpse of Australia’s dinosaur fauna during the first half of the Early Cretaceous Period,” Dr Salisbury said.

“It’s such a magical place — Australia’s own Jurassic Park, in a spectacular wilderness setting.”

In 2008, the Western Australian Government selected Walmadany as the preferred site for a $40 billion liquid natural gas processing precinct.

The area’s Traditional Custodians, the Goolarabooloo people, contacted Dr Salisbury and his team, who dedicated more than 400 hours to investigating and documenting the dinosaur tracks.

“We needed the world to see what was at stake,” Goolarabooloo Law Boss Phillip Roe said.

The dinosaur tracks form part of a song cycle that extends along the coast and then inland for 450 km, tracing the journey of a Dreamtime creator being called Marala, the Emu man.

“Marala was the Lawgiver. He gave country the rules we need to follow. How to behave, to keep things in balance,” Mr Roe said said.

“It’s great to work with UQ researchers. We learnt a lot from them and they learnt a lot from us.”

Dr Salisbury said the surrounding political issues made the project “particularly intense,” and he was relieved when National Heritage listing was granted to the area in 2011 and the gas project collapsed in 2013.

“There are thousands of tracks around Walmadany. Of these, 150 can confidently be assigned to 21 specific track types, representing four main groups of dinosaurs, ” Dr Salisbury said.

“There were five different types of predatory dinosaur tracks, at least six types of tracks from long-necked herbivorous sauropods, four types of tracks from two-legged herbivorous ornithopods, and six types of tracks from armoured dinosaurs.

“Among the tracks is the only confirmed evidence for stegosaurs in Australia. There are also some of the largest dinosaur tracks ever recorded. Some of the sauropod tracks are around 1.7 m long.”

“Most of Australia’s dinosaur fossils come from the eastern side of the continent, and are between 115 and 90 million years old. The tracks in Broome are considerably older.”

The research has been published as the 2016 Memoir of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Ancient bird Archaeopteryx and Donald Trump


This video says about itself:

23 May 2014

In 1860 in Germany, an unusual fossil was found that shocked the world. It seemed to be a strange combination of a dinosaur and a bird. It was the 150 million-year-old fossil of Archaeopteryx. The skeleton looked like a normal two-legged meat-eating dinosaur, but it had one very special feature: feathers. Its feathers are how it got its name, which means “ancient wing”.

By Peter Frost in Britain:

Archaeopteryx takes to the skies

Friday 24th March 2017

The fossil which proved the evolutionary link between dinosaurs and birds is on tour. PETER FROST explains why this scientific discovery is still relevant today

CHARLES DARWIN published his earth-shattering book On the Origin of Species in 1859. The book outlined the theory of evolution that is still, despite its compelling evidence, being argued about today, especially in the United States bible belt and even in President Donald Trump’s White House.

Part of Darwin’s argument predicted finding fossil evidence for the transitional stage between dinosaurs and what would become birds. At the time of his writing, Darwin predicted that evidence would be uncovered to prove his theory. Critics scoffed and noted the absence of any fossil evidence.

Then in 1861, just two years after his book was published, the fossil of a single feather was uncovered in the limestone layers of Solnhofen in Bavaria, southern Germany. It was clear evidence for the transitional fossil between dinosaurs and birds that Darwin had predicted. The great scientist was vindicated, to the dismay of his critics.

That same year more proof arrived when the first complete specimen of Archaeopteryx was discovered. That first skeleton, later to be known as “the London specimen,” was unearthed near Langenaltheim, Germany. It finally proved the link between dinosaurs and birds.

The fossil was given to local physician Karl Haberlein in return for medical services. Over the years, ten more fossils of Archaeopteryx have surfaced all in the same limestone layers of Solnhofen.

These fossil archaeopteryx have since become key evidence for the origin of birds, the transitional fossils debate and the confirmation of evolution.

The original German fossil was purchased by Britain in 1863 for £700 and was kept initially at the British Museum. When the Natural History Museum opened in South Kensington in 1881, the fossil became one of its most important exhibits.

Until this year it had never left the museum, but since March 18 it has been the star exhibit in a travelling exhibition at the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo.

At first glance the fossil might seem to be just a ragtag assortment of bones, but on closer inspection you can understand why Archaeopteryx is so interesting and important.

Today, the thin limestone slabs that contain the bones of this pivotal creature are considered priceless. If one ever came to auction it would sell for millions of pounds.

The delicate stone has been carefully reinforced using a strong plastic resin but is still incredibly delicate. Museums officials are satisfied the iconic fossil will come to no harm in transit or during its time on display in Japan.

The Archaeopteryx fossil has beautiful impressions of feathers and wings — like a bird. But then it also displays the claws, the long bony tail and the serrated teeth more normally associated with dinosaurs.

Archaeopteryx was roughly the size of a small chicken, with broad wings that were rounded at the ends and a long tail compared to its body length.

Its feathers were very similar in structure to modern-day bird feathers. Unlike modern birds, Archaeopteryx had small teeth as well as a long bony tail, features which the species shared with other dinosaurs of the time.

Directors of modern dinosaur films may have used their computers to make Archaeopteryx into a soaring elegant flyer — something like a giant condor. In reality, it was probably an ungainly beast capable only of flapping flight from one low shrub to another.

In a world where more and more fundamentalist religious views are arguing against the science of evolution, it is important that the convincing evidence of fossils is made as widely known as possible.

President Trump and Vice-President Mike Pence were asked for their thoughts on evolution and Darwin. Pence told Congress he believed in teaching creationism in schools to balance out the theory of evolution.

In answer to a journalists question, he replied: “Do I believe in evolution? I embrace the view that God created the heavens and the Earth, the seas and all that’s in them.”

Pence wants the biblical story of creation taught in biology class alongside evolution.

With backwoodsman Trump as president, it will certainly happen.

Sadly the pair of them are in good company as many people in the United States agree with them.

While the majority of people in Europe and in many other parts of the world accept evolution, the United States lags behind.

Today, four in every 10 adults in the US believe that humans have existed in our present form since the beginning of time. In many religious groups, that number is even higher.

Perhaps then it is good news that the remarkable Archaeopteryx fossil is making the journey to Tokyo as just one of 300 exhibits from the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.

The travelling exhibition features all sorts of objects, including many animals that inspired Darwin directly and demonstrate the truth of evolution.

The artefacts range from a lion from the royal menagerie to an exquisite glass model of an octopus. All have a fascinating science backstory.

“Science is a global endeavour fuelled by wonder and curiosity. So it has been an ambition for us to share these extraordinary treasures with a wider audience,” Natural History Museum director Sir Michael Dixon told us.

“They are the essence of the scientific exploration that inspired pioneers and continues today at the Natural History Museum.”

Other destinations for this exciting touring exhibition beyond Japan will be announced in due course, but I doubt they will be welcome in Trump and Pence’s Washington.

Dinosaur family tree, new theory


Dinosaur family trees, K. Padian/Nature 2017

From Science News:

Anatomy analysis suggests new dinosaur family tree

Proposal would radically alter century-old groupings

By Rachel Ehrenberg

2:06pm, March 22, 2017

Relative rethink

Scientists have long-divided the dinosaurs into two main groups, the bird-hipped and the reptile-hipped (top). A new analysis breaks up the reptile-hipped lineage and suggests the bird-hipped group shares recent ancestors with meat-eating theropods (bottom). Scientists have been unsure where to put the confusing two-legged, meat-eating herrerasaurids (red lines, top). The new analysis suggests they are close relatives of the sauropods (bottom).

The standard dinosaur family tree may soon be just a relic.

After examining more than 400 anatomical traits, scientists have proposed a radical reshuffling of the major dinosaur groups. The rewrite, reported in the March 23 Nature, upsets century-old ideas about dinosaur evolution. It lends support to the accepted idea that the earliest dinosaurs were smallish, two-legged creatures. But contrary to current thinking, the new tree suggests that these early dinosaurs had grasping hands and were omnivores, snapping up meat and plant matter alike.

“This is a novel proposal and a really interesting hypothesis,” says Randall Irmis, a paleontologist at the Natural History Museum of Utah and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Irmis, who was not involved with the work, says it’s “a possibility” that the new family tree reflects actual dinosaur relationships. But, he says, “It goes against our ideas of the general relationships of dinosaurs. It’s certainly going to generate a lot of discussion.”

The accepted tree of dinosaur relationships has three dominant branches, each containing critters familiar even to the non–dinosaur obsessed. One branch leads to the “bird-hipped” ornithischians, which include the plant-eating duckbills, stegosaurs and Triceratops and its bony-frilled kin. Another branch contains the “reptile-hipped” saurischians, which are further divided into two groups: the plant-eating sauropods (typically four-legged, like Brontosaurus) and the meat-eating theropods (typically two-legged, like Tyrannosaurus rex and modern birds).

This split between the bird-hipped and reptile-hipped dinos was first proposed in 1887 by British paleontologist Harry Seeley, who had noticed the two strikingly different kinds of pelvic anatomy. That hypothesis of dinosaur relationships was formalized and strengthened in the 1980s and has been accepted since then.

The new tree yields four groups atop two main branches. The bird-hipped ornithischians, which used to live on their own lone branch, now share a main branch with the reptile-hipped theropods like T. rex. This placement suggests these once-distant cousins are actually closely related. It also underscores existing questions about the bird-hipped dinos, an oddball group with murky origins; they appear late in the dinosaur fossil record and then are everywhere. Some scientists have suggested that they evolved from an existing group of dinosaurs, perhaps similarly herbivorous sauropods. But by placing the bird-hipped dinos next to the theropods, the tree hints that the late-to-the-party vegetarian weirdos could have evolved from their now close relatives, the meat-eating theropods.

Sauropods (like Brontosaurus) are no longer next to the theropods but now reside on a branch with the meat-eating herrerasaurids. Herrerasaurids are a confusing group of creatures that some scientists think belong near the other meat eaters, the theropods, while others say the herrerasaurids are not quite dinosaurs at all.

The new hypothesis of relationships came about when researchers led by Matthew Baron, a paleontologist at the University of Cambridge and Natural History Museum in London, decided to do a wholesale examination of dinosaur anatomy with fresh eyes. Using a mix of fossils, photographs and descriptions from the scientific literature, Baron and colleagues surveyed the anatomy of more than 70 different dinosaurs and non-dino close relatives, examining 457 anatomical features. The presence, absence and types of features, which include the shape of a hole on the snout, a cheekbone ridge and braincase anatomy, were fed into a computer program, generating a family tree that groups animals that share specialized features.

In this new interpretation of dinosaur anatomy and the resulting tree, many of the earliest dinosaurs have grasping hands and a mix of meat-eating and plant-eating teeth. If the earliest dinos were really omnivores, given the relationships in the new four-pronged tree, the evolution of specialized diets (vegetarians and meat eaters) each happened twice in the dinosaur lineage.

When the researchers saw the resulting tree, “We were very surprised — and cautious,” Baron says. “It’s a big change that flies in the face of 130 years of thinking.”

The arrangement of the new tree stuck even when the researchers fiddled around with their descriptions of various features, Baron says. The close relationship between the bird-hipped, plant-eating ornithischians and the reptile-hipped, meat-eating theropods, for example, isn’t based on one or two distinctive traits but on 21 small details.

“The lesson is that dinosaur groups aren’t characterized by radical new inventions,” says paleontologist Kevin Padian of the University of California, Berkeley. “The relationships are read in the minutiae, not big horns and frills.” That said, Padian, whose assessment of the research also appears in Nature, isn’t certain that the new tree reflects reality. Such trees are constructed based on how scientists interpret particular anatomical features, decisions that will surely be quibbled with. “The devil is in the details,” Padian says. “These guys have done their homework and now everyone’s going to have to roll up their sleeves and start checking their work.”

Feathered dinosaurs, new research


This video says about itself:

29 July 2015

“Anchiornis” is a genus of small, feathered, eumaniraptoran dinosaurs. The genus “Anchiornis” contains only the type species “Anchiornis huxleyi“. It was named in honor of Thomas Henry Huxley, an early proponent of biological evolution, and the first to propose a close evolutionary relationship between birds and dinosaurs. The generic name “Anchiornis” means “near bird”, and its describers cited it as important in filling a gap in the transition between the body plans of birds and dinosaurs.

“Anchiornis huxleyi” fossils have been found in the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning, China, in rocks dated to the late Jurassic period, 161.0–160.5 million years ago.

Given the exquisite preservation of one of the animal’s fossils, “Anchiornis huxleyi” became the first dinosaur species for which almost the entire life coloration could be determined.

“Anchiornis huxleyi” was a small, paravian dinosaur with a triangular skull bearing several details in common with dromaeosaurids and troodontids. “Anchiornis” had very long legs, usually an indication that they were strong runners. However, the extensive leg feathers indicate that this may be a vestigial trait, as running animals tend to have reduced, not increased, hair or feathers on their legs. The forelimbs of “Anchiornis” were also very long, similar to archaeopterygids.

The first fossil was recovered from the Yaolugou locality, Jianchang County, western Liaoning, China; the second, at the Daxishan locality of the same area. The deposits are lake sediment, and are of uncertain age. Radiological measurements indicate an early Late Jurassic age for them, between 161 and 151 million years ago.

From Science News:

Under lasers, a feathered dino shows some skin

Geochemical fluorescence method illuminates Anchiornis soft tissue, but some remain skeptical

By Helen Thompson

2:40pm, March 20, 2017

What happens when you shoot lasers at a dinosaur fossil? Some chemicals preserved in the fossil glow, providing a nuanced portrait of the ancient creature’s bones, feathers and soft tissue such as skin.

Soft tissue is rarely preserved in fossils, and when it is, it can be easily obscured. A technique called laser-stimulated fluorescence “excites the few skin atoms left in the matrix, making them glow to reveal what the shape of the dinosaur actually looked like,” says Michael Pittman, a paleontologist at the University of Hong Kong.

Pittman and colleagues turned their lasers on Anchiornis, a four-winged dinosaur about the size of a pigeon with feathered arms and legs. It lived around 160 million years ago during the Jurassic Period. The researchers imaged nine specimens under laser light and used the photos to reconstruct a model of Anchiornis that shows an exceedingly birdlike body, the team writes March 1 in Nature Communications.

In the crooks of its elbows and wrists, the dinosaur had what looks like taut tissues called patagia, a feature in modern bird wings. “The wings of Anchiornis are reminiscent of the wings of some living gliding and soaring birds,” Pittman says. Plus, the images capture minute details like feather follicles and scales, and confirm some characteristics of Anchiornis long surmised by scientists: that it had drumstick-shaped legs, pads on the balls of its feet and a slim tail.

Still, it’s unclear what geochemicals are actually fluorescing in the fossils because the team didn’t perform any chemical analyses to determine the organic compounds or minerals present. “The images are very cool,” says Mary Schweitzer, a paleontologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. But, she cautions, a few hurdles remain, including testing fluorescence in different fossil types and verifying how skin glows under laser light in modern bird fossils.

Scientists normally rely on light-based methods and skeletal data to reconstruct the appearance of dinosaurs and other ancient creatures. Ultraviolet fluorescence works similarly to the new method, but the laser technique captures greater resolution. If laser-stimulated fluorescence lives up to its promise, it could help discern fossilized features that are invisible to the naked eye.

Functional form

Drawing from Anchiornis fossil specimens housed in a Chinese museum, researchers used measurements from laser-stimulated fluorescence images to create a more refined outline of the dinosaur’s body.

Computer game on evolution of bird flight


This video from the USA says about itself:

Flap to the Future – American Robin

7 February 2017

HELFUL TIP: I play through the level twice. Skip to 3:02 for former personal best time.

Wowza, wowza! A bird game! Of course I’m going to play it longer than I should.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology sent out an email today about this game, so I tried it out and maybe got somewhat good at the American Robin stage. It’s a super easy stage assuming you have a good path routed and can pull off a few tight maneuvers. Though my time is very beatable, I’ll leave it as is since it seems that my new best times aren’t being posted on the leaderboards for some reason. I could always go back and restart my file to have a new best time posted, but I really don’t want to lose the random generated name I currently have on my account. I’ll just have to deal with my initial 05:30.17 minute clear time on the leaderboards.

EDIT: The leaderboards are now functional beyond the initial completion of a level! However, I accidentally reset my game like an idiot, and as such, Lilac-feathered Friendly Heron will forever be displayed with mediocre completion times.

My current mobile name is now Agile Tourmaline-backed Heron, and my current PC name is Least-bearded Fluffheron.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Video Game Lets You Scamper, Glide, and Flap Through the Evolution of Flight

Skip through time and explore how birds mastered the skies with our new video game. Start as an earthbound dinosaur and then feel the thrill of feathered wings and flapping flight. Then jump ahead 100 million years from now to imagine the future of flight. The game is free, mobile-friendly, and runs in a web browser. There’s no app download necessary—just an interest in dinosaurs, flight, or video games. Visit Bird Academy to play (and—bonus—find out your very own fanciful bird name).

Dinosaur discoveries in China


This video says about itself:

Zhejiang Museum of Natural History – Hangzhou – Zhejiang – China

06.07.2014

From the Daily Star in Britain:

Real life Jurassic Park uncovered as scientists find DINOSAUR fossils hidden underground

A REAL life Jurassic Park once home to six species of dinosaur has been uncovered after researchers found almost 100 fossil sites.

By Jess Bell / Published 12th February 2017

A team of experts carrying out a six-year survey in east China’s Zhejiang Province have shared their incredible findings.

They found 82 fossil sites and 25 types of eggs during the excavation between 2006 and 2013.

Scientists from the Zhejiang Institute of Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology and the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History worked together on the research.

They used a range of techniques from geology and paleobiology to chronostratigraphy which identifies the deposition of rocks.

Experts also combined site inspections and excavations to scour the site in minute detail.

The survey covered a vast area of 11,000 square kilometres [around] the province’s capital Hangzhou.

Jin Xingsheng, deputy curator of the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, said: “It has been proved that a large quantity of dinosaurs lived in Zhejiang during the Cretaceous period, about 65 million to 145 million years ago.

“Compared with other southeastern provinces, Zhejiang has the largest amount of dinosaur fossils.”

The researchers’ new findings also provide evidence that a comet or asteroid was responsible for wiping out the dinosaurs.

Scientists discovered the sedimentary rocks, where most of the fossils were discovered, were encased by layers of volcanic rocks. Experts studying the volcanic Deccan Traps recently revealed new details of a double disaster which could have been responsible for the dinosaur extinction.

Their findings show two plumes of magma could have combined with a devastating asteroid hit to ravage the Earth 65 million years ago.

South African boy discovers dinosaur tooth


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Dinosaur find in Knysna

6 February 2017

Ben Ingel, a learner at Oakhill School, found the tooth of a 120 million year-old dinosaur.

Video Elaine King, Knysna-Plettt Herald.

Read more here.

From eNCA.com in South Africa:

Grade 8 pupil discovers tooth of dinosaur in Knysna

Wednesday 8 February 2017 – 5:33am

JOHANNESBURG – Knysna has landed itself prominently on the archaeological map.

Thirteen-year-old Grade 8 pupil, Benjamin Ingel discovered a tooth there — and it very likely comes from a dinosaur.

Ingel reportedly found the tooth while walking near Knysna lagoon. He brought it home to show his family.

Ingel’s grandfather, Vernon Rice, approached some experts to verify the authenticity of the find. Geologists Rob Muir and Roger Schoon agreed to come to his house to have a look.

Rice said: “They took one look and I could see from their faces we had something.”

Palaeontologist Robert Gess at the Albany Museum in Grahamstown invited Ben and his grandfather to the museum to allow palaeontologists to examine the specimen more closely.

Wits University palaeontologist Jonah Choiniere, who has seen photographs of the tooth, believes that it is about 140 million years old and belonged to a carnivorous theropod.

Choiniere believes the dinosaur weighed between 500kg and a ton.

“This was a meat-eater of considerable size; his head would bump on the ceiling of my house,” said palaeontologist Dr Billy de Klerk, who has also seen the tooth.

“These teeth are so rare that in a span of 30 years I have only seen 15 decent teeth,” De Klerk added.

Ingel is prepared to donate the tooth to a museum after he shows it to his friends at school.

Probably, the teeth belongerd to an individual of the Allosaurus family.