Valdosaurus dinosaur, well-preserved fossil found in England

This video says about itself:

2 September 2015

Dryosaurus” is a genus of an ornithopod dinosaur that lived in the Late Jurassic period. It was an iguanodont. Fossils have been found in the western United States, and were first discovered in the late 19th century. “Valdosaurus canaliculatus” and “Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki” were both formerly considered to represent species of “Dryosaurus”.

“Dryosaurus” had a long neck, long, slender legs and a long, stiff tail. Its arms, however, with five fingers on each hand, were short. Known specimens were about 8 to 14 feet long and weighed 170 to 200 pounds. However, the adult size is unknown, as no known adult specimens of the genus have been found.

“Dryosaurus” had a horny beak and cheek teeth and, like other ornithopods, was a herbivore. Some scientists suggest that it had cheek-like structures to prevent the loss of food while the animal processed it in the mouth.

A quick and agile runner with strong legs, “Dryosaurus” used its stiff tail as a counterbalance. It probably relied on its speed as a main defense against carnivorous dinosaurs.

The teeth of “Dryosaurus” were, according to museum curator John Foster, characterized by “a strong median ridge on the lateral surface.” “Dryosaurus” subsisted primarily on low growing vegetation in ancient floodplains.

A “Dryosaurus” hatchling found at Dinosaur National Monument in Utah confirmed that “Dryosaurus” followed similar patterns of craniofacial development to other vertebrates; the eyes were proportionally large while young and the muzzle proportionally short. As the animal grew, its eyes became proportionally smaller and its snout proportionally longer.

By Pete Buchholz in Britain:

A specimen of the dryosaurid Valdosaurus has been discovered on the Isle of Wight

The most complete specimen of the poorly known dryosaurid Valdosaurus canaliculatus has been discovered in Lower Cretaceous rocks on the Isle of Wight. This new discovery helps flesh out the anatomy of this dinosaur and is one of the most complete dinosaur specimens known from England.

The Isle of Wight off the south coast of England is a fossil-hunter’s paradise. Rocks of the Wessex Formation, deposited during the Early Cretaceous, approximately 130 million years ago, are exposed in numerous locations across the island. The Wessex Formation preserves numerous fish, turtles, crocodilians, and pterosaurs. It also has a rather famous dinosaur fauna, including the spinosaurid Baryonyx, the early tyrannosaur Eotyrannus, a number of fragmentary sauropods, and the ornithopods Iguanodon, Mantellisaurus, Hypsilophodon, and Valdosaurus.

Psittacosaurus dinosaur’s camouflage colours discovered

This video from Germany says about itself:

3D camouflage in an ornithischian dinosaur

16 September 2016

We sat down in the Senckenberg Museum, Frankfurt, with Dr Jakob Vinther, University of Bristol, to examine the colour patterns of Psittacosaurus. This exquisite fossil has its skin preserved intact and so we’re able to make inferences about the environment in which it used to live.

Paper available here.

From Current Biology, 26 September 2016:

3D Camouflage in an Ornithischian Dinosaur

In Brief

Countershading camouflage uses a dark-to-light gradient from back to belly to counter the light-to-dark gradient created by illumination. The body appears flatter and less conspicuous.

Vinther et al. use 3D reconstruction and radiance modeling to show that the dinosaur Psittacosaurus was countershaded and cryptic in a forested environment.


Preserved pigments in the dinosaur Psittacosaurus suggest countershading camouflage

We predicted the optimal countershading camouflage for different light environments

The dinosaur’s patterns would have been cryptic in a forest, but not open, habitat

We can also infer that dinosaur predators used shape-from-shading cues to detect prey

See also here.

Tyrannosaurus rex in Dutch museum, video

This 9 September 2016 Dutch video shows Tyrannosaurus rex fossil Trix, which arrived recently in Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

Tyrannosaurus rex Trix in Dutch Naturalis museum

This 9 September 2016 video shows Tyrannosaurus rexTrix‘ after her arrival in Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

Tyrannosaurus rex discoverers interviewed

This 24 August 2016 video from Montana in the USA shows an interview with [Dutch born amateur paleontologist] Michele and Blaine Lunstad and ‘Dino Cowboy’ Clayton Phipps; about their discovery of Tyrannosaurus rex fossil ‘Trix‘ in May 2013. Recently, Trix arrived in Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

How to excavate dinosaurs, videos

In this 28 August 2016 Dutch video, recorded in the USA, paleontologist Dylan Bastiaans explains how to package dinosaur bones so they can be transported safely.

In this 28 August 2016 Dutch video, recorded in the USA, paleontologist Martijn Guliker explains about special fossils which he found.

In this 28 August 2016 Dutch video, recorded in the USA, paleontologists explain how to excavate dinosaurs.