Tyrannosaurs were agile, new study


This video says about itself:

Paleontology News: Tyrannosaurs Were The Most Agile Theropods

18 September 2018

Tyrannosaurs were huge and powerful, but T.rex and its tyrannosaur relatives could also fight quickly when battling ceratopsians or other theropods.

Tyrannosaurs are twice as agile as allosaurs and other large theropods or megatheropods, showing that they would have an edge in combat against dinosaurian rivals or prey. Tyrannosaur experts like Thomas Holtz, Scott Hartman and Donald Henderson authored the paper. Other megatheropods like Carcharodontosaurus would have been blitzed by Ultra Instinct T.rex.

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Raptorex dinosaur, did it exist?


This 18 September 2018 video says about itself:

Did RaptorexReally Exist?

Paleontologists have been studying and drawing totally different conclusions about the fossil LH PV18 for almost a decade. Is it just one of many specimens of a theropod called Tarbosaurus bataar or is it an entirely different theropod named Raptorex kriegsteini? In order to answer this question, you have to understand the many ways in which we can–and can’t–determine the age of a fossil.

The biggest dinosaurs of all time


This 16 September 2018 video says about itself:

The Biggest Dinosaurs Of All Time

Some dinosaurs were the biggest land-dwelling animals to ever exist on Earth. When you picture a dinosaur, you might imagine a 13-meter long T. rex or a Titanosaur the size of an airplane.

But the first dinosaurs would have only come up to your knee. It turns out that sauropods, like Brontosaurus, developed special adaptations that allowed them to tower over the competition.

Triassic, earliest dinosaurs video


This 5 September 2018 video says about itself:

In this video we shall take a look into the earliest and first dinosaurs to have ever existed in this world.

These early dinosaurs are the oldest to be discovered in fossils of the Triassic age timeline.

The earliest dinosaurs are small in size and are mainly bipedal. … The comparison of the first dinosaurs and the large dinosaurs is really contrasting since the larger dinosaurs dwarf the early dinosaurs in height and weight.

The Eoraptor was once thought to be the earliest dinosaur to have existed, but then the Eoraptor lost that title to other early dinosaurs like the Saturnalia and then to the Nyasasaurus.

The Saturnalia predates the Eoraptor by 1 million years and the Nyasasaurus predates the others by more than 10 million years.

The Nyasasaurus is the earliest dinosaur we know, but definitely not the first since there is a probability that other dinosaurs might be found in the future. So, enjoy this video on the First / earliest dinosaurs comparison and timeline. The timeline is in the millions of years in the Triassic.

Timeline: Riojasaurus – 227 MYA, Alwalkeria/Herrerasaurus/Pisanosaurus/Saurikosaurus/Chromogisaurus – 230 MYA, Eoraptor – 231 MYA, Saturnalia – 232 MYA, Spondylosoma – 242 MYA and Nyasasaurus – 243 MYA.

Ankylosaur dinosaur species compared, video


This 3 September 2018 video says about itself:

Ankylosaurus family species comparison

Welcome to the seventh round of the new dinosaur comparison videos.

In this comparison video, we shall compare the different ankylosaur family species or also known as ankylosaurids. These dinosaurs have armored spikes and plates and are among the largest and most armored terrestrial land herbivore dinosaurs to have existed in the world.

Ankylosaurus is one of the largest terrestrial herbivores to have ever existed while Euoplocephalus is also on the top ten list along with others like Sauropelta, Nodosaurus etc.

There are 13 ankylosaurids that have been confirmed from fossils and these ankylosaur species differ in size and comparison so much that the smallest of them weighs less than one tonne and the largest weighs more than 8 tonnes.

Animals of ‘Walking with Dinosaurs’, video


This 28 August 2018 video says about itself:

Size Comparison of featured creatures in “Walking with Dinosaurs” (1999):

Walking with Dinosaurs is a six-part dinosaur television documentary mini-series that was produced by the BBC, narrated by Kenneth Branagh, and first aired in the United Kingdom in 1999. The series was subsequently aired in the United States on the Discovery Channel with Branagh’s narration replaced with that of Avery Brooks.

The series uses computer-generated imagery and animatronics to recreate the reign of the dinosaurs, beginning in the late Triassic period and concluding in the late Cretaceous period at the K-T boundary mass extinction event, 66 million years ago.

The Guinness Book of World Records reported that Walking with Dinosaurs was the most expensive documentary series per minute ever made.

FEATURED CREATURES: Allosaurus, Ankylosaurus, Brachiosaurus, Iguanodon (carcass), Liliensternus (this dinosaur doesn’t appear in the TV program), Ornithocheirus, Plateosaurus, Stegosaurus, Torosaurus, Tyrannosaurus or T-rex, Utahraptor.

Music: Artist: Bass Farmers. Track: Walk The Dinosaur.

Stegosaur species compared, video


This 24 August 2018 video says about itself:

Stegosaur family species comparison

Welcome to the fifth round of the new dinosaur comparison videos. In this comparison video, we shall compare the different stegosaur family species, also known as stegosaurids.

These dinosaurs have spines and plates and are one of the largest terrestrial land herbivore dinosaurs to have existed in the world. Some genera: Stegosaurus, Dacentrurus, Miragaia etc.

These stegosaur species differ in size and comparison so much that the smallest of them weighs less than one tonne and the largest weighs more than 15 tonnes. The smallest stegosaurid measures only 5-6 meters in length while the largest measures more than 12-14 meters in length. These stegosaur species all have one thing in common, the noticeable strong and elongated skull.

In this video of the stegosaur family species comparison, we shall take a more detailed look at 13 stegosaurids, their size, where and when they existed. Most of them are in China, so they’re Chinese dinosaurs.