Elephant mother protects calf from wild dogs


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Elephant Mom & Calf Protect Themselves from Wild Dogs

12 April 2016

Amazing video of a mother elephant trying to protect her calf from a pack of wild dogs.

Video by: Marc

North American mammoths, new study


This video says about itself:

1 December 2014

Woolly Mammoth: The Autopsy

Science Documentary hosted by Steven Mackintosh, published by Channel 4 in 2014 – English narration

The 2013 discovery in Siberia of the best-preserved mammoth yet has quickened the pace of one of the most ambitious and controversial projects in science: the cloning of the woolly mammoth. This one is unlike any mammoth found before; when it was dug out of the permafrost, a dark red liquid oozed from the frozen body. Speculation is rife: could the liquid be mammoth blood? And does the freshness of the mammoth’s flesh mean that a clone is now achievable?

This documentary follows an international team of mammoth specialists and cloning scientists as they carry out a historic autopsy in Siberia, and follows those who strive to bring these iconic giants of the Ice Age back from extinction. As the animal is carefully dissected and its tusks are examined, the programme reveals the life story of this mammoth in forensic detail.

From Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution:

Mammuthus Population Dynamics in Late Pleistocene North America: Divergence, Phylogeography and Introgression

06 April 2016

After evolving in Africa at the close of the Miocene, mammoths (Mammuthus sp.) spread through much of the northern hemisphere, diversifying morphologically as they entered various habitats. Paleontologically, these morphs are conventionally recognized as species.

In Pleistocene North America alone, several mammoth species have been recognized, inhabiting environments as different as cold tundra-steppe in the north and the arid grasslands or temperate savanna-parklands of the south. Yet mammoth phylogeographic studies have overwhelmingly focused on permafrost-preserved remains of only one of these species, Mammuthus primigenius (woolly mammoth).

Here we challenge this bias by performing a geographically and taxonomically wide survey of mammoth genetic diversity across North America. Using a targeted enrichment technique, we sequenced 67 complete mitochondrial genomes from non-primigenius specimens representing M. columbi (Columbian mammoth), M. jeffersonii (Jeffersonian mammoth), and M. exilis (pygmy mammoth), including specimens from contexts not generally associated with good DNA preservation.

While we uncovered clear phylogeographic structure in mammoth matrilines, their phylogeny as recovered from mitochondrial DNA is not compatible with existing systematic interpretations of their paleontological record. Instead, our results strongly suggest that various nominal mammoth species interbred, perhaps extensively.

We hypothesize that at least two distinct stages of interbreeding between conventional paleontological species are likely responsible for this pattern – one between Siberian woolly mammoths and resident American populations that introduced woolly mammoth phenotypes to the continent, and another between ecomorphologically distinct populations of woolly and Columbian mammoths in North America south of the ice.

Columbian mammoth discovery in Oklahoma, USA


This video says about itself:

BBC: Columbian Mammoth, Death by Tar – Ice Age Death Trap

26 August 2008

With the help of CGI and animal puppetry, BBC’s Ice Age Death Trap team bring the … mammoth back to life to explain how such a giant creature could be killed by tar.

By Dominique Mosbergen, Senior Writer, The Huffington Post in the USA:

Bulldozer Operator Stumbles Upon Mammoth Skull In Oklahoma

The remains are at least 11,000 years old.

04/05/2016 05:21 am ET

Imagine being at work and stumbling, completely by chance, upon a mammoth discovery — a literal one, at that.

That’s what happened last month to a bulldozer operator in northwestern Oklahoma, who found the remains of a Columbian mammoth while on the job.

According to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, the man was working at a sand pit near Alva when he made the surprise find. A partial mammoth skull, along with two tusks, have since been unearthed from the area.

“We don’t know the cause of death. There is no sign that people killed or butchered it,” archeologist Lee Bement told Live Science of the animal remains, which have yet to be dated. “Its skull was washed around in the river. The rest of the animal could be anywhere.”

Mammoth discoveries in the U.S. are not entirely unusual. Earlier this year, a mammoth femur was found under Oregon State University’s football field, and last September, two Michigan farmers stumbled upon mammoth remains in a soybean field.

Bement told Live Science that Oklahoma is home to about three “mammoth sightings” a year. Still, each new discovery brings hope of something new and unexpected.

“Archeological fieldwork is always exciting. You never know what you are going to find,” he said.

As The Associated Press noted, Columbian mammoths were a common sight across the Plains until they — along with many large Ice Age animals, including mastodons, giant sloths and giant bears — went extinct at the end of Pleistocene era about 11,000 years ago. Scientists are still unsure as to what prompted this mass die-off, though hunting by humans and climate change have been floated as possible culprits.

Elephant herd helps calf stuck in waterhole


This video says about itself:

Elephant Herd Helps Rescue a Calf That’s Stuck in a Waterhole

22 March 2016

An elephant calf gets stuck in a waterhole. What happens next is so touching! Elephants are just amazing creatures.

Taken in the Kruger National Park in South Africa.

African elephant migrates to Somalia


This 2013 video is about Somali silver elephant coins.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands today:

An elephant has traveled hundreds of kilometers in East Africa, and for the first time in twenty years, has crossed the border with Somalia. The male, Morgan, in December, had been equipped with a GPS transmitter in the Kenyan [Tana river] delta and recalled according to experts an old migration route which had not been used for a long time.

Because of the war, no elephants have been seen in Somalia for twenty years been seen, say biologists to the French news agency AFP. “He had a clear idea of ​​where he was going,” said Iain Douglas Hamilton of Save the Elephants. His organization has equipped hundreds of African elephants with GPS transmitters.

Morgan, who is in his thirties, began his walk at the Tana river in Kenya. Most of the distance he did at night. According to Douglas Hamilton the animal crossed an extremely dangerous area, where poachers are very active.

Last year, 20,000 elephants were slain by poachers in Africa. … Along the Kenyan coast, where Morgan began, in the early 1970’s there were still about 20,000 elephants; now at most 300. Kenya in recent years have been successful in the fight against poachers. Last year 93 elephants were killed, in 2014 that was 164.

Combating poaching seems to have worked for Morgan, who probably was looking for a female. He managed to make more than 200 kilometers. He did not stay long in Somalia. Three kilometers inland, he decided to return.

WASHINGTON admitted late on Wednesday that US special forces raided a southern Somali town on Tuesday night: here.

African elephant mother protects calf, video


This video says about itself:

Mother Elephant Protects Calf From Tourists

27 January 2016

Incredible video showing how a mother elephant stops her calf from going any closer to spectating tourists. Almost as if she is saying “Don’t talk to strangers”.

Taken on the H3 near Malelane in the Kruger National Park in South Africa.

Video by: Marc