Chinese baby elephant rescued fom pit


This video says about itself:

21 January 2015

An elephant calf makes an escape after it fell into a water storage pit in China’s Yunnan province on Tuesday. The calf tried to climb out of the two-metre-deep pit unsuccessfully before being found by local villagers. Police officers spent half an hour shovelling in earth to lower one of the sides of the pit, so the calf could climb out and return to the forest.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Video: Baby elephant is rescued in China after getting stuck down a water pit

The elephant is believed to have been stuck in the pit for a day before being spotted

Jack Simpson

Thursday 22 January 2015

A baby elephant has been rescued after it fell into an empty water storage pit in south-west China.

The tiny calf is said to have become trapped after venturing near the pit next to a nature reserve in the Yunan Province.

According to reports, the elephant could have been in the pit for over 24 hours.

The calf was found in the two metre deep ditch by local residents on Wednesday.

The villagers then alerted police, who came to help [to] rescue the elephant.

Officials believe that the elephant slipped into the pit after heavy rain had caused the surrounding area to become slippery.

A police spokesman said: “Looking at the scene the elephant probably fell into the hole yesterday.

“Because it rained yesterday, the ground around the pit was slippery.”

To help the elephant out, rescuers filled one side of the pit with dirt, while using hoes to lower its ledge.

The whole rescue effort was captured on camera.

After an hour of attempts to haul itself out, the elephant was eventually able to escape, before running into the forest.

The tiny elephant is now expected to join back up with its herd.

Mastodon discovery in Michigan backyard


This video from the USA says about itself:

Bachelor party makes rare mastodon fossil discovery

13 June 2014

People at a bachelor party on a lake shore in New Mexico stumbled upon a rare fossil: the skull of a mastodon. It is considered to be an ancient elephant, complete with tusks and teeth. Scott Pelley reports.

From Popular Science in the USA today:

These Guys Found The Remains Of A 14,000-Year-Old Butchered Mastodon In Their Backyard

Mastodon burgers anyone?

By Mary Beth Griggs

Posted 39 minutes ago

It isn’t every day that you find bones in your backyard, much less a 4-foot long rib bone sticking out of the earth. After that initial, massive find, neighbors Daniel LaPoint Jr. and Eric Witzke kept digging, eventually unearthing 42 massive bones from a property in Bellevue Township, Michigan last November. At first, they thought the bones might have belonged to a dinosaur, but it turns out that the remains were far younger.

“Preliminary examination indicates that the animal may have been butchered by humans,” Daniel Fisher, director of the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology told the Lansing State Journal. Fisher examined the bones when LaPoint and Witzke contacted the museum, and eventually determined that in addition to being butchered by humans, the bones belonged to a 37-year-old mastodon (a relative of elephants and mammoths) that lived roughly 14,000 years ago.

The Journal reports that while unusual, finding the bones of mastodons isn’t totally unheard of in Michigan; about 330 sites have been confirmed around the state, two in the past year.

Fossils found on private land in the United States belong to the landowner, not the government, so the fossil finders LaPoint and Witzke are keeping a few of the bones as the coolest mementoes ever and donating the rest to the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology. But before they travelled to the museum, the pair took the bones to a local school, where kids got to experience the fossils up close and personal.

“All the kids got to pick them up and hold them. Some kids, it was life-changing for them. To change one kid’s life because they got to touch it, I think, is an incredible opportunity.” LaPoint told the Lansing State Journal.

See also here.

Rare elephant twins born in South Africa


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Rare elephant twins, Pongola Game Reserve

5 December 2014

From Wildlife Extra:

Rare elephant twins born in South Africa

A rare pair of elephant twins have been born in Pongola Game Reserve in Northern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa and are doing well according to initial reports.

Scientific evidence suggests that there is less than one percent prevalence rate of elephants twinning and even less of a chance that both twins survive into adulthood, making the birth of these young elephant twins an incredibly rare natural occurrence.

The yet unnamed twins were born to a 31 year old elephant cow called Curve, so named for the curve of one of her tusks. However the sex of the twins remains unconfirmed as Curve is being given enough space and a fighting chance to beat the mortality odds for the twins.

“This is the best approach,” said elephant specialist Dr. Ian Whyte from the Dept. of Scientific Services at the National Parks Board, Kruger National Park.

“Mortality of one of the twins usually occurs as the increasing demand for milk by two calves cannot be met by the mother and the less dominant of the two calves usually cannot gain access to its share. One rather famous matriarch in Kruger dubbed MaMerle produced a set of twins in 2002, both of which survived to post weaning age, and she then produced a second set in 2006, both of which had survived to more than a year old when she was last seen. Curve needs a stress free environment to beat the odds.”

Mammoth ancestor discovery in Namibia


Moeritherium

This picture, like the others in this blog post, is by German artist Heinrich Harder (1858-1935). It depicts Moeritherium, one of the earliest species, ancestral to present day elephants.

Palaeomastodon

This picture shows Palaeomastodon, which lived later than Moeritherium: about 36 million years ago.

Deinotherium

Still later came Deinotherium, looking more like present day elephants; though its tusks pointed downwards.

Before elephant evolution led to the woolly mammoths of about 100,000 years ago, ancestors of these mammoths lived in Africa. They were Mammuthus subplanifrons. Ever since the 1920s, only a few small fossils of this species had been found.

Recently, Dutch paleontologist Dick Mol found an almost complete skeleton of such a fossil ancestor, 3-4 million years old, in Etosha national park in Namibia. Later, Mr Mol says, mammoths left Africa for Eurasia; and humans went along with them.

This video is called Hunting for Woolly Mammoths Documentary.

Yesterday, in Amsterdam, the exhibition Giants of the Ice Age, on mammoths and similar animals, started.

Belgian king shoots elephants and deer


This video is called The Elephant Documentary.

Translated from Vroege Vogels radio in the Netherlands:

September 30, 2014 18:06

Again, the Belgian King Philip is under fire. He was first the subject of a public debate because he hunted elephants, now it’s because he wants to shoot sixty hinds. These animals run around in a field in the Ardennes that is his property. The Belgian authorities apparently have given him permission for that.

On Monday, the Belgian monarch, incognito, took a look in a gun shop to buy a new weapon. His visit, after it was recorded by a photographer, led to a stream of criticism.

Global awareness of animal welfare or not; Philip must and will organize his traditional hunts each year. Mid-October is the time, and his guest list consists entirely of family.

This is a parody video about hunting by Belgian comedian Kamagurka.