Elephants in Kenya video


This video from Kenya says about itself:

17 November 2016

Visiting Ol Pejeta in the rainy season is a lot of fun! It is a time of plenty for the animals and when the rain stops and the sun comes out, everything glistens and shines! Join us as we drive through the mud and watch male elephants challenging each other for females.

Woolly mammoths, why extinct?


This video says about itself:

18 November 2016

What caused woolly mammoths to die-off so quickly? New evidence suggests an unfavorable climate may have contributed to a loss of grazing habitats, which eventually drove them to extinction.

From: MAMMOTHS: GIANTS OF THE ICE AGE.

African elephant orphans in Kenya


This video says about itself:

6 October 2016

In the Samburu Conservancy a tuskless matriarch elephant shows kindness towards young orphan elephants that are trying to find their way in the Kenyan bush.

Baby elephant playing, video


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Baby Elephant‘s Piggy Back Ride Goes Adorably Wrong

27 October 2016

Baby Ellies just want to have fun….

The animal kingdom in all its majesty can also bring about light hearted family moments as you can see when this young elephant was playing around with a fellow member and took an unexpected tumble.

Watch this funny moment captured on a trip to Addo Elephant Park by 50 year old train driver, Thys Pretorius.

“We were standing still at a dam in Addo just watching the elephants bathing and playing around. You could see there was so much joy and excitement amongst the herd. I was just loving sitting there and watching them all have fun.

Suddenly my eye caught a boisterous young calf trying to climb on top of another sibling. All was going well but then the next moment he underestimated his push off the ground and took a roll right off the other youngster.

After that the herd just started moving on as if nothing had happened.

It was a really sweet and funny moment and I’m so glad I got it captured on film. This really made my day.”

Chinese elephants saved from reservoir


This video says about itself:

Wild elephants rescued from reservoir in SW China

12 October 2016

Three wild Asian elephants, two adults and a baby, were trapped in a reservoir in southwest China’s Yunnan Province for more than two days, which may cause them to choke on the water and die from hunger.

Rescuers tried many ways and finally managed to save these endangered animals on Tuesday by digging out a path from one side of the pond.

Dutch NOS TV writes today about this (translated):

Over two days, they were stuck in a five-meter deep tank: two wild adult elephants and a baby elephant. Foresters found the animals in south[western] China after getting information from locals, but could not immediately launch a rescue operation because of heavy rains.

Probably the baby elephant first fell in a tank full of water and its parents then fell in a rescue attempt. Images on Chinese state TV show how other elephants ran around the edge of the reservoir. In order to save the trapped animals, the other elephants first had to be driven away with firecrackers.

Eventually, rescue workers with a backhoe demolished the wall of the tank, and the elephants could get out.

African elephants, how they walk


This 2014 video is about African elephants walking on a savannah in Kenya.

From Science News:

African elephants walk on their tippy-toes

by Helen Thompson

7:00am, October 10, 2016

Elephants don’t wear high heels, but they certainly walk like they do.

Foot problems plague pachyderm conservation efforts. But it’s not clear if being in captivity causes changes in walking gait that drive these foot problems or whether the environment messes with their natural walking style.

Testing walking in wild elephants is challenging, so evolutionary morphologist Olga Panagiotopoulou of the University of Queensland and her colleagues opted for the closest thing. Researchers trained five African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at a park in South Africa to walk over pressure-sensing platforms to map the distribution of weight on their feet. The team compared their data to similar tests of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in a zoo in England.

Regardless of species or setting, a trend emerged: Elephants put the most pressure on the outside toes of their front feet and the least pressure on their heels, scientists report October 5 in Royal Society Open Science. Thus, elephants naturally walk on their tiptoes, and harder surfaces of captive environments must cramp their walking style. As a potential monitoring system, the pressure plates used in the study could aid conservationists and elephant podiatrists.

Very close African elephant encounter


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Extremely Close Elephant Encounter

Silence is most definitely golden when it comes to being so up close and personal with this incredible giant tusker….

Eswe Ras, Front of House manager for Sausage Tree Safari Camp, on the Balule Private Game Reserve, was lucky enough to have experienced this heart pounding encounter with such a majestic animal.

Eswe is a qualified guide and occasionally does the tracking on game drives (as per this incident).

“This was a unique experience for me, but occasionally trackers do get approached by various animals out of curiosity.”

This happened in February 2016 shortly after we departed for the afternoon drive from camp. We approached a small group of elephant bulls and parked about 30 metres away from them, respecting their space. They gradually started moving closer to us, this is when Ezulwini (the elephant bull) approached the vehicle to pass on by. As seen on the video he came towards me and stood in front of me (what is not seen on the video is that he put his trunk around my one ankle, smelling me) for a few seconds. Our head guide Kevin van der Linde was filming the incident.

It was certainly quite intimidating having such a huge animal so close to you & touching you but I never felt that I was in any danger. Ezulwini is an elephant well-known to guides & trackers here on Balule and he is a very gentle-natured animal. The feeling I think would best be described as complete awe and definitely an adrenalin rush.”

After Ezulwini’s curiosity faded, he simply moved off and resumed feeding along with the other bulls.