Nigerian women raped by army, Amnesty says


This Amnesty International video says about itself:

Nigeria: ‘They betrayed us’

24 May 2018

These brave women are taking on the Nigerian government by asking for justice for themselves and their families.

Thousands of women and girls who survived the brutal rule of the Boko Haram armed group have since been further abused by the Nigerian security forces who claim to be rescuing them.

Amnesty international’s latest report, “They betrayed us” reveals how the Nigerian military and Civilian Joint Task Force (Civilian JTF) – a militia who work alongside them – have separated women from their husbands and confined them in remote “satellite camps” where they have been raped, sometimes in exchange for food. Amnesty International has collected evidence that thousands of people have starved to death in the camps in Borno state, north-east Nigeria, since 2015.

Nigeria: “They betrayed us”: Women who survived Boko Haram raped, starved and detained in Nigeria; Amnesty International report here.

Advertisements

Nigerian women’s mangrove conservation


This 2012 video says about itself:

Concern Universal is working to help preserve the last remaining mangrove forest in Nigeria. In this short film, see how training local communities, planting 20,000 new trees and educating schoolchildren can help prevent the Nigerian mangroves being lost forever.

From BirdLife:

5 Mar 2018

Women are championing mangrove conservation in Nigeria

A women-led civil society group in Nigeria is empowering women and the whole community to protect Nigeria’s extremely productive but disappearing mangrove forests, which provide abundant services to the marine environment and people.

By Jude Fuhnwi

A group of women are working tirelessly to reverse life-threatening challenges facing local economies in Nigeria, as the country’s declining mangrove forests face extinction – after decades of degradation. The Society for Women and Vulnerable Groups (SWOVUGE) is helping communities to restore and sustainably manage mangrove forests in the five villages of the Ukpom Okom District in South East Nigeria.

The Ukpom Community Mangrove in Akwa Ibom State is an important breeding site and home to numerous species of wildlife such as crocodiles, tortoises, turtles, fish, shrimps, crab, snails, clam and oysters. A large population of people also depends on resources from this rich mangrove forest to support their livelihoods.

However, limited knowledge about sustainable resource management in the communities has exposed the mangrove to activities that threaten its biodiversity. Overharvesting of mangrove forest products, including trees used for firewood in homes, or to dry fish or build canoes, have reduced the mangrove at an alarming rate. Patches of the forested mangrove have also been cleared for housing development, putting the ecosystem services and economic benefits of the mangrove at risk.

To preserve mangrove’s bounty and ensure that communities continue to benefit from its resources, the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) has provided financial support to SWOVUGE through BirdLife International, in our capacity as regional implementation team for the Guinean Forests of West Africa Hotspot. The funds will support a mangrove restoration project on the site.

The project, funded under the Small Grants programme and referred to as the “Ukpom-Okon Community Mangrove restoration and tree planting project, Nigeria”, empowers women to conserve the very essence on which their livelihoods depend.

“Nigeria has no gazetted mangrove protected areas. Apart from this ongoing project, there has been no internationally supported women-driven project on mangrove restoration in the country,” said Emem Umoh, Coordinator of the project.

At least seven women are on the frontline, working with communities and coordinating all project-related activities to ensure that everyone in the five villages benefits from the project during its two-year cycle, with special attention to women beneficiaries. More than 330 women have been reached directly through different workshops organized in various communities to raise awareness about the importance of mangrove restoration and tree planting.

“We tell them to encourage other women to participate in project activities,” said Ms Umoh.

“I did not know, until now, that felling of mangroves indiscriminately could damage resources if trees are not planted to replace the felled ones”, explained 53-year-old Christiana Akpan, leader of a women’s group from the Ikot Etegne community who attended one of the sensitization workshops.

Barely nine months after the project was launched, over 400 trees have been planted in key areas and 600 more have been earmarked for distribution to women in the communities as part of efforts to promote agro-forestry practice. Two nursery sites have been established in two communities to grow the Rhizophora species of mangrove tree and over 400 seedlings grown.

How mangroves help keep the planet cool: here.