Birds and squirrels in Cornwall, video


This video from Britain says about itself:

Woodland Birds and Squirrels

Birds in the video are: Robin, Jay, Chaffinch, Blue Tit and Great Tit

Filmed in January 2016

Video Produced by Paul Dinning – Wildlife in Cornwall

The squirrel is a grey squirrel.

Bird migration in the Americas, Internet map


This video is about bird migration.

Frpm the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA, about bird migration in the Americas:

Watch a Mesmerizing Migration Map

Watch the wonder and spectacle of bird migration captured on a single map. Using millions of bird observations from participants in eBird and the Great Backyard Bird Count, scientists at the Cornell Lab generated an animated map showing the annual journeys of 118 bird species. Watch how the routes change in spring and fall as birds ride seasonal winds to their international destinations. See the map in motion and read more.

Want to know which species is which? Check out the numbered key.

‘Drones may help meadow birds’


This video from Cornwall is called Meadow Pipit: Birds Singing and Chirping a Beautiful Bird Song.

Drones may be abused to kill civilians.

However, they can also be used to make beautiful videos of dolphins, like this one.

Today, regional broadcaster RTV Oost in the Netherlands reports they can help nesting meadow birds.

Drones with infrared cameras may record where meadow bird nests are better than observers on the land. Then, farmers can be warned how to avoid damaging the nests while working on the land.

Wigeon, long-tailed tits and robin


This video from Germany is about long-tailed tits.

Today, to the park south-east of the city.

In a meadow: grey lag geese, Canada geese, Egyptian geese. And mute swans.

About a hundred wigeon swimming and on canal banks.

A robin in a bush.

A group of long-tailed tits and a great tit in a tree with catkins.

Mallards and male and female tufted ducks in a canal.

A pheasant.

A jay in a tree.

From little girl to reed warbler biologist


This video says about itself:

3 July 2015

A family of Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus is shown searching for small invertebrates in a reed-bed. The well-grown chicks are old enough to feed themselves and they closely resemble their parents.

Translated from Vroege Vogels radio in the Netherlands today:

Like father like daughter

From her childhood on Anne Kwak was taken by her father [Robert Kwak] to a pond. He was there to count birds, she was there to play, because Anne was not interested in birds. Twenty-five years later they are still there, because Anne now is investigating the reed warbler.

Anne is npw a biologist and employee of the Radboud University in Nijmegen and is doing recently PhD research into the impact of pesticides on populations of reed warblers.

Robert is a biologist and works as head of the conservation department of Birdlife in the Netherlands. He specializes in waterfowl.

Polish coot winters in Dutch Zwolle


This 2011 video is from the Plaswijckpark in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. A young coot had got stuck in a fence. People managed to free it. After investigation whether it was wounded, the bird was freed and swam again.

Translated from Dutch Vroege Vogels radio today:

Polish coot in Zwolle

Now, every winter already for seven years there is a coot with a numbered collar in a park in Zwolle. The animal turns out to have been ringed in eastern Poland!

Sad

The coot was discovered by Claudia van der Leur, making a walk every day around the park. “I thought at first it was a bit sad, a coot with such a large collar. But now that I look back at it for so many years, one may assume that it does not suffer from this band. ”

Van der Leur came into contact with fellow birdwatcher Louis Zandbergen. Who scanned the Internet for the origin of the animal. It turned out to be a coot ringed in eastern Poland in 2010. Except in Poland and Zwolle, the animal has also been seen on several occasions in Germany.

Not ab usual migratory bird

Gerrit Gerritsen of BirdLife in the Netherlands Bird explains that although coots are not standard migrating birds “they still can travel considerable distances. In winter there are huge groups in our country. and part of them comes from Eastern Europe, as demonstrated by this lovely sighting by Claudia and Louis.”

Site fidelity

That the animal has such fidelity to this site is not so surprising to Gerritsen. “A bird of course has an advantage if it is on familiar ground in both winter and summer. Then it learns best where the good food is and where dangers threaten.”

Waterbirds in Kazakhstan counted


This video is called Birds of Kazakhstan. Cinclus pallasii (brown dipper).

From BirdLife:

Kazakhstan’s latest winter census sees fewer waterbirds in more wetlands

By Danara Zharbolova, Tue, 09/02/2016 – 11:18

Waterbirds (birds that live in freshwater habitats) cover tens of thousands of kilometres every year during their annual migration to warmer climates. To help determine their population status and trends, every January over 20 million waterbirds are counted in the Western Palearctic region, and up to 10 million in Sub-Saharan Africa by a network of about 15,000 volunteers for the International Waterbird Census.

The census, which began in 1967 in Europe and Asia, turns 50 this year. Coordinated by Wetlands International, today it covers more than 25.000 sites in more than 100 countries, making it one of the largest global monitoring schemes largely based on citizen science. The data it provides helps conservationists advocate for the right international and national policies to conserve waterbird populations and key wetland sites.

Kazakhstan began conducting its winter census in the central, southern and western parts of the country in 2004. Lead by the Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity of Kazakhstan (ACBK, BirdLife in Kazakhstan), the data of the winter census is used to identify changes in waterbird numbers and for monitoring key ornithological areas. This year, ornithologists surveyed 15 wetlands and counted more than 130.000 wintering birds from 80 species, including the Mallard, the Eurasian Wigeon, the Common Teal, the Ruddy Shelduck and the Greylag Goose.

The distribution of the species seen was unlike the previous years because of a warmer-than-usual winter that even brought out the crocuses. Wetlands in southern Kazakhstan were not frozen, leading to more sites being available for the birds than usual. For example, in the south, waterbirds were found not just at the Chardara reservoir, but also at the Koksaray, Badam reservoirs and Shohkakol lakes, which normally freeze over in the winter. More birds were also seen in the more northern reaches of the Caspian Sea.

“The weather was… mild and without precipitation. [Only] 40-60% of smaller water bodies in the southern region were covered in ice and birds were recorded on almost all of them, even if not in great numbers,” said Valeriy Khrokov, an ACBK board member. Counts are conducted in January because this is when many waterbird species congregate conspicuously at a relatively small number of sites where they can be readily counted.

Despite overall numbers being within the range of the last few years, some species did see a drop in population, owing mostly to the warm winter, according to experts. In the south, the population of the Mallard (56.800) was half that of 2012-2014, and the population of the Greylag Goose (2.530) was lower than four years ago. On Karakol Lake, the number of Mute Swans dropped from 3.500 to 2.000 between January 12 and January 16, which was much lower than the 14.000 recorded here in previous years.

However, there were some bright spots: the numbers of the Ruddy Shelduck doubled to 10.500 and volunteers counted 1.000 Greater Flamingos as well.

This year was also special for another reason: For the first time, students participated in this important task together with ornithologists. Around 30 students surveyed water bodies with 14 qualified recorders and learned to identify species. As a result, ACBK was able to cover the biggest number of wetlands ever, including all the really important sites.