Good Seychelles conservation news


From BirdLife:

Cousin Island Special Reserve – a success story

By Martin Fowlie, Tue, 15/04/2014 – 11:23

This video tells the conservation success story of Cousin Island Special Reserve, a former coconut enterprise now turned nature reserve in the Seychelles. Managed by local NGO and BirdLife Partner, Nature Seychelles, Cousin lies approximately 2 km from Praslin Island, Seychelles. The island became the World’s first internationally-owned reserve in 1968 when it was purchased by the International Council for the Protection of Birds (now Birdlife International) to save the last remaining population of the Seychelles warbler.

Cousin at the time had been cleared of its native vegetation and planted wall to wall with coconuts. Pigs, chickens and cattle had been introduced. Soon after its purchase, the Seychelles Government designated the island as a Nature Reserve under the Wild Animals and Birds Protection Act. In 1975, Cousin was designated a Special Reserve. This included the marine area up to 400m beyond the High Water Mark. Today, Cousin Island is a bird sanctuary; home to many endemic land birds and an important breeding site for seabirds. It is the most important rookery for Hawksbill turtles in the Western Indian Ocean. The island has been successfully restored to its natural vegetation and has received international awards for its conservation efforts and eco-tourism initiatives.

Enhanced by Zemanta

First international bird fair in China


This video is about birds and other wildlife in China.

From BirdLife:

BirdLife participates in mainland China’s first international bird fair

By Martin Fowlie, Wed, 16/04/2014 – 20:59

Fifteen years ago, birdwatching was regarded as an unusual minority hobby in mainland China. Today, there are about 40 birdwatching societies with thousands of regular members all over the country, and numbers are growing rapidly.

BirdLife International was recently invited to participate in the first International Bird Fair held in Fuzhou, in Fujian Province in south-east China organised by Fujian Bird Watching Society and the Fujian Youth Environmental Protection Union. The event was a great success and was attended by an amazing 20,000 people from all walks of life.

“China has had an impressive growth in its economy over the last three decades and now we are witnessing an impressive growth in the conservation movement. Most of the birders are from the younger generations who are eager to learn more about nature and conservation. This will surely be a great support to the conservation movement of this big country and make the slogan of ‘Beautiful China’ come true”, said Simba Chan, BirdLife’s Senior Conservation Officer for Asia.

The fair was held at the Fuzhou National Forest Park, a popular birding and hiking area and one of the sites where modern ornithology took root in China. A team from BirdLife, together with BirdLife Partners RSPB (UK), Audubon Society (USA), Bird Studies Canada, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, the Hong Kong Bird Watching Society, Burung Indonesia and BirdLife Australia took part in historic event, with 19 birdwatching or wild bird societies from mainland China, five wild bird societies from Taiwan and several other government and civil environmental organisations based in China.

To further emphasise China’s interest in and importance for birds, a meeting on international conservation for youth took place on the same day as the festival at the Agriculture and Forestry University in Fuzhou. BirdLife Partners from the USA, Australia, Indonesia and the UK gave examples of conservation and education work from their own countries and emphasised the importance of cooperation along the flyway, something the BirdLife Partnership excels at and something that is needed to save the amazing spectacle of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and the birds that use it.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Irish and British rare bird news


This video is called Red-rumped Swallow sunbathing and preening on a tree.

Here is another red-rumped swallow video.

From Rare Bird Alert in Britain:

Sunday 20th April 2014

The third Sardinian Warbler for County Cork, and for Ireland, was discovered late morning today, in Scott’s Garden on Dursey Island, where it remained until late evening. Two Red-rumped Swallows spent the afternoon over the Cam Washes at Upware, Cambridgeshire, whilst one also flew over Felixstowe Docks, Suffolk. Two White-billed Divers were off the coast of Lewis, Western Isles and a Ferruginous Duck was on Lough Beg, County Derry.

Lingering rarities included the unringed Red-breasted Goose in Dumfries and Galloway, White-billed Diver in Aberdeenshire, Black Duck in County Mayo and Two-barred Crossbills in Yorkshire and Norfolk (three).

Enhanced by Zemanta

Woodpeckers and bananaquit in Costa Rica


Golden-hooded tanagers, blue-gray tanager, 20 March 2014

As this blog wrote, in the morning of 20 March 2014 at Arenal observatory in Costa Rica, it started to rain. As this photo, of two golden-hooded tanagers and a blue-grey tanager at feeders, shows.

Black-cheeked woodpecker male, 20 March 2014

Nevertheless, a male and a female black-cheeked woodpecker kept looking for food on a tree.

Black-cheeked woodpecker male, Costa Rica, 20 March 2014

Passerini's tanager male, 20 March 2014

Passerini’s tanagers, both male and female.

Passerini's tanager male, Costa Rica, 20 March 2014

Bananaquit, 20 March 2014

A small bird: a bananaquit.

A social flycatcher on a roof.

Pale-billed woodpecker male, 20 March 2014

Then, two spectacular birds: a pale-billed woodpecker couple, feeding on a big tree.

Pale-billed woodpecker female and male, 20 March 2014

A green honeycreeper.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Northern lapwing inspires music composer


This video is about a northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) at its nest.

Today on Dutch radio, for the first time a new piece of music by composer Henk Doeke Odinga was played.

This composition, for piano and clarinet, is about northern lapwings.

Both the sound and the movements of these birds inspired Odinga.

The music starts with part of the French national anthem, the Marseillaise. That is because, if there is a harsh winter in the Netherlands, lapwings migrate south to France.

You can listen to the music here.

You can download the music here.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tanagers and honeycreepers in Costa Rica


This video, recorded at the Arenal volcano observatory in Costa Rica, is about Montezuma’s oropendolas.

As this blog reported, on 19 March 2014 we arrived near the Arenal volcano.

Next morning, 20 April.

A clay-coloured thrush.

Blue-grey tanager, 20 March 2014

A blue-grey tanager at the feeder water melons.

Montezuma's oropendola, 20 March 2014

Along with a flock of Montezuma’s oropendolas.

While white-nosed coatis walk underneath, hoping some food will fall.

Red-legged honeycreeper male, 20 March 2014

Red-legged honeycreepers near the feeder as well.

Red-legged honeycreeper female, 20 March 2014

Both males and females.

Red-legged honeycreeper male, Arenal, 20 March 2014

Hepatic tanager, 20 March 2014

A hepatic tanager.

Scarlet-thighed dacnis, 20 March 2014

A scarlet-thighed dacnis.

Scarlet-thighed dacnis and clay-coloured thrush, 20 March 2014

Enhanced by Zemanta

Lesser whitethroat and godwits


This video is about a lesser whitethroat singing in Norway.

Yesterday, 19 April, again to the nature reserve where Baillon’s crakes nested a few years ago.

Near the entrance, a moorhen and grey lag geese swim.

Many more black-headed gulls than usually. Last year, a few couples nested here for the first time. Today, many more nests.

One black-headed gull has a twig in its bill.

A northern lapwing on a grassy bank.

Very young mallard ducklings. Many grey lag geese with goslings as well.

A jackdaw. A starling. Mute swans swimming in the southern lake.

In the northern lake, teal swim. About twenty black-tailed godwits. Less than a few weeks ago here, as spring migration is far advanced now.

On the biggest northern lake island: a great cormorant, gadwall ducks and tufted ducks.

An oystercatcher.

A male common pochard flying. A northern shoveler couple swimming.

A redshank on an islet.

A magpie.

Near the railway, a chiffchaff sings.

In the northern meadow: grey lag geese, Canada geese Egyptian geese. Lapwings. A jackdaw. And hares.

Something special: a lesser whitethroat sings in a tree at the north-eastern end. Probably, it arrived recently from Africa on its spring migration.

A greenfinch sings there too.

Two barn swallows flying. Probably, recent arrivals from Africa as well.

Just before we leave, Canada geese with goslings. Smaller goslings than many grey lag goslings here, as Canada geese usually nest later.

Enhanced by Zemanta

New York City red-tailed hawk news


This video from the USA about New York City red-tailed hawks says about itself:

Egg in the nest? Rosie and Bobby switching nest duty – March 15th, 2014

15 mrt. 2014

It appears that there is now, at the very least, one egg in the Washington Square Park Hawk nest.

Bobby and Rosie are now regularly taking turns sitting in their nest. A fellow Hawk-watcher informed me that she saw the nest-switching behavior quite clearly yesterday after I had already left the park for the day.

I took this footage of Bobby and Rosie switching nest duty this morning. Also included in the video is footage of Rosie eating and perching in various spots.

You can hear Rosie calling out starting at the 34 second mark.

I cut the audio in a couple of the clips in order to not distract the viewer from having to hear park noise that was occurring during the action.

From Roger_Paw blog in the USA, about nesting red-tailed hawks in Washington Square Park, New York City:

At least one of Bobby and Rosie’s eggs have hatched – April 18th, 2014

The first hatching was reported by NYU to have happened yesterday morning (April 17th). The egg hatched three days after it was ‘expected’ to which is so in keeping with Rosie and Bobby’s broods.

Their eggs typically hatch two to three days later than the 28-35 days ornithologists have said Red-tailed Hawks eggs usually do. There are many conditions that affect when the eggs hatch (latitude, for example).

Fledging is said to usually occur 42 – 46 days after hatching but interestingly, all of Rosie and Bobby’s offspring in the past fledged at least two days later than ‘expected’.

If all goes well, this first 2014 hatchling should fledge between May 29th – June 2nd.

Enhanced by Zemanta

White storks walking in busy traffic, video


This is a video about a white stork couple walking together in the Netherlands, while busy traffic passes.

Fadime Uzun made the video.

Enhanced by Zemanta