Seabirds on Scottish desert island


This 21 May 2021 video says about itself:

RSPB Scotland works in some amazing places, but few as spectacular as the uninhabited Shiant Isles off the East coast of Lewis. A team recently returned to see if their efforts to remove invasive predators from the island were still successful.

Hummingbirds at Panama feeder


This video says about itself:

Snowy-bellied Hummingbird And Violet-crowned Woodnymph Visit The Panama Fruit Feeder – May 27, 2021

The nectar feeder is popular this morning. A Snowy-bellied Hummingbird came in for some nectar and then an hour later a female or juvenile Violet-crowned Woodnymph came in for a lengthy drink.

Young New Zealand albatross stretches her wings


This video from New Zealand says about itself:

Tiaki Stretches Wings, Shows Off Plumage On #RoyalCam | DOC | Cornell Lab – May 25, 2021

RoyalCam was set up in January 2016 by the Department of Conservation. For the 2019/2020 season we have collaborated with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. To learn more while watching, view the cam at here.

Royal Cam is a 24-hour live stream of a Northern Royal Albatross nest during the breeding season at Pukekura/Taiaroa Head on the southeast tip of New Zealand’s South Island.

The season of 2019/2020 has seen the Royal Cam once again move up the hill. Now at Top Flat Track our new pair is OGK (banded Orange, Green, Black) a 21-year-old male and YRK (banded Yellow, Red, Black) and 25-year-old female. YRK laid the egg on 14 November 2019.

This season the live stream has partnered with Cornell Bird Lab. There are some new features including a trial of night vision and the ability to pan and zoom the camera at the ranger’s discretion.

Saving millions of Gough island seabirds


This 19 May 2021 video says about itself:

Part of the UK Overseas Territory of St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, Gough Island is home to more than eight million breeding birds from at least 24 different species, including highly threatened species such as the Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross, Atlantic petrel, MacGillivray’s prion, Gough bunting and Tristan albatross.

More about Gough island

The Critically Endangered Tristan albatross, one of the world’s greatest wanderers, is in need of an eleventh-hour intervention.

Mice were accidentally introduced by sailors to the remote Gough Island during the 19th century. These rodents have now colonised this World Heritage Site and learnt to exploit all available food sources on the island – including seabirds. Video cameras reveal how the mice eat the flesh of live seabird chicks – and, more recently, live adult birds too. Tristan albatross chicks weigh up to 10kg (more than 300 times the size of the mice), but the open wounds inflicted frequently lead to their deaths.

The situation is so severe that just 21% of Tristan albatross chicks survived to fledge during the 2017/18 breeding season. Such low breeding success is rapidly pushing the Tristan albatross towards extinction. The new evidence of attacks on adults is a dreadful development – the loss of adults will accelerate the path to extinction for this amazing bird.

The RSPB and Tristan da Cunha have developed an ambitious programme to save the Tristan albatross and other highly threatened species on Gough, such as MacGillivray’s prion and Atlantic petrel. Successfully restoring the island to a seabird haven will prevent the deaths of at least two million seabirds each year.

The coronavirus pandemic delayed the project, but the team are now back on the island ready to take the next step in restoring the seabird colonies.

The project is being run by the RSPB, in partnership with Tristan da Cunha, UK Government, Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (South Africa), BirdLife South Africa, BirdLife International, Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, Island Conservation, Grupo de Ecología y Conservación de Islas and the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland.

Sound recording by Roelf Daling.

Find out more here.

Basilisk and motmot in Panama


This video says about itself:

Male Common Basilisk And Rufous Motmot Visit The Panama Fruit Feeder – May 20, 2021

A male Common Basilisk and a Rufous Motmot were both drawn to the buffet and the motmot does not seem interested in sharing the platform. Both of these visitors have a habit of being statue-still for portions of their time at the feeder. Note that this basilisk lost his tail at some point and it is slowly growing back in.

Birds and squirrel in Panama


This video says about itself:

Rufous Motmot, Red-tailed Squirrel And Blue-grey Tanager On The Panama Fruit Feeder – April 28, 2021

These three species are daily visitors to the Panama Fruit Feeder, here they are all in one clip each seeking some fresh banana. The Red-tailed Squirrels have developed tactics that allow them to liberate and make off with entire bananas.