Cornell red-tailed hawk nest update


This video from the USA about red-tailed hawks says about itself:

27 March 2014

Big Red has been vocalizing for quite a long time, Ezra is perched atop Bradfield Hall but we cannot tell whether or not he is answering. Soon BR decides that the conversation is over and takes flight from the nest. Ezra then leaves Bradfield & takes over incubation duties on the nest. What a team they make!

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Guess When the Hawks Will Hatch!

With three warm eggs and a fortified stick nest, Big Red and Ezra are making steady progress toward hatching out a new set of nestlings in the next week. Red-tailed Hawk eggs usually take between 28 and 35 days to hatch, but the last two years the Cornell hawks incubated for longer durations: 38 days in 2012 and 39 in 2013. This year’s first egg was laid on March 19 at 1:11 P.M. EDT and this Friday, April 25, would be the 37th day since the first egg was laid, but it’s a new year and anybody’s guess when the eggs will begin hatching.

To add to the excitement of watching new life enter the world, we’re running a contest to see who can guess the hatch date and time of the first egg to the closest minute. “Hatch” for the purposes of the contest involves the first time that a chick’s complete head is visible and the cap is off the egg. The winner will receive a Cornell Lab starter kit (including a special edition Bird Cams notepad, thermal cooler, tote bag, coffee mug, journal and pen, plus a microfiber lens cloth cleaner), and everyone who enters can download a wallpaper closeup image of Big Red. Good luck!

Enter your guess now.

We’ll continue to post updates on the Bird Cams Facebook page and on Twitter at @birdcams.

Thank you for watching!

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Motmot, other rainforest wildlife in Costa Rica


Swallow-tailed kite, 20 March 2014

20 March 2014. After the morning, in the afternoon still around the Arenal volcano in Costa Rica. Two swallow-tailed kites flying near a restaurant.

Blue-and-yellow macaw, 20 March 2014

So does a blue-and-yellow macaw. It flies freely, but then sits on a fence, so close that it is probably a pet.

A bit further away, in a tree, its smaller relatives, crimson-fronted parakeets, are definitely not pets.

This video is called Canopy Tour near Arenal, Costa Rica.

We walk in a rainforest, where bridges as depicted in the video, span steep ravines along rivers. An opportunity to look at wildlife in the canopy … if you have no fear of heights.

Dull-mantled antbird, 20 March 2014

Near one of the smaller bridges, a dull-mantled antbird.

A crested guan.

Leaf-cutting ants.

A slaty-tailed trogon in a tree.

Arenal volcano, 20 March 2014

Still clouds around the top of the Arenal volcano, but less so than on some other days.

Rufous motmot, 20 March 2014

A rufous motmot. Costa Rica’s biggest motmot species.

Northern schiffornis, 20 March 2014

And a northern schiffornis. Not a colourful bird; but a rare bird, singing enthusiastically.

Northern schiffornis singing, 20 March 2014

A black-headed nightingale-thrush not far away on the footpath.

An ochre-bellied flycatcher.

Two piratic flycatchers in a tree near the parking lot.

Near the lake, the biggest kingfisher species of Costa Rica: a ringed kingfisher. It sits on a building, near a great egret on the bank.

Arenal bird list: here.

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Dutch bird, mammal and caterpillar news


This video is about black terns in the Netherlands.

Dutch conservation organisation Zuid-Hollands Landschap, in their annual report about 2013, mention not only birds of the Zandmotor island, but also birds and other wildlife elsewhere.

In their nature reserves in the Krimpenerwaard region, numbers of black tern nests rose to 76 last year.

In the Zouweboezem reserve, purple heron nests rose from 149 in 2012 to 152 in 2013.

On the Groene Strand beach on Voorne island, there were 284 nesting black-headed gull couples. Figures for other species there: common tern: 196; redshank: 4; ringed plover: 3; little ringed plover: 6; avocet: 17; oystercatcher: 7.

In the sand dunes of Goeree island, more to the south, rare tundra voles were discovered. Other small mammal species in those dunes: wood mouse; common shrew; and greater white-toothed shrew.

In the Voorhofsche polder, near Waddinxveen, in 2013 there were 45 black-tailed godwit nests; 34 northern lapwing nests; and 12 redshank nests. Common terns and tufted ducks nested there as well.

And in Staelduin nature reserve, a caterpillar was found of the rare sycamore moth.

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Dutch coastal birds news


This is a Dutch video about the artificial sandy island Zandmotor, in the North Sea, south-west of The Hague.

In their annual report about 2013, Dutch conservation organisation Zuid-Hollands Landschap reports about the Zandmotor.

Two little ringed plover couples nested there last year.

Among species in winter there were snow bunting, peregrine falcon, Iceland gull and red-breasted merganser.

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Hummingbirds and tanagers in Costa Rica


Brown violet-ear, 20 March 2014

In the morning of 20 March 2014 at Arenal observatory in Costa Rica, there were not only woodpeckers and bananaquits, but also, like at many other places in Costa Rica, hummingbirds. Eg, this brown violet-ear.

Brown violet-ear flying, 20 March 2014

Scaly-breasted hummingbird, 20 March 2014

And scaly-breasted hummingbirds.

Palm tanager, 20 March 2014

Also, a palm tanager.

Brown jay, 20 March 2014

The feeders attracted brown jays as well.

Two laughing falcons flying past.

A white-throated thrush.

A buff-throated saltator.

A sulphur-bellied flycatcher.

A male green honeycreeper.

Bay-headed tanager, 20 March 2014

A bay-headed tanager.

Golden-hooded tanager, 20 March 2014

And a golden-hooded tanager.

A black-striped sparrow.

A social flycatcher.

It stops raining. We walk around.

Garden emerald female, 20 March 2014

A garden emerald hummingbird sitting on a bush; then, flying.

A yellow-bellied elenia.

A house wren on the ground.

A variable seedeater.

A chestnut-sided warbler. And a fellow migrant from North America: a Tennessee warbler.

A black-cowled oriole.

A great kiskadee.

A white-necked jacobin hummingbird.

After that small bird, a bigger one: a keel-billed toucan; the second biggest toucan species of Costa Rica.

A hepatic tanager.

A grey-capped flycatcher.

Leaf-mimicking praying mantis, 20 March 2014

As we go back, a special insect: a leaf-mimicking praying mantis. Very probably, the genus Choeradodis. Probably, the species Choeradodis rhomboidea.

Lake Arenal, 20 March 2014

White-collared swifts flying above the lake. Though this is a big species for a swift, they were still too small and too far away to show on the photo.

A turkey vulture flying.

Rufous-tailed hummingbird, 20 March 2014

We started this blog post with a hummingbird. And now we finish it with another one: a rufous-tailed hummingbird.

Stay tuned, as there will be more about Costa Rica on 20 March 2014.

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Saudi prince kills 2,100 vulnerable houbara bustards in Pakistan


This video is called MacQueen’s Bustard on a mating dance.

Note: the article below here mentions “houbara bustards“. Meanwhile, biologists consider the MacQueen’s bustards of Pakistan and elsewhere in Asia, as a species, separate from the African houbara bustard. BirdLife still sees the two species as one species; which it considers Vulnerable.

From Dawn daily in Pakistan:

Arab royal hunts down 2,100 houbara bustards in three week safari

KARACHI: A Saudi prince has poached over 2,100 internationally protected houbara bustards in 21-day hunting safari in Chagai, Balochistan, during which the royal also indulged in illegal hunting in protected areas, says a report.

The report titled ‘Visit of Prince Fahd bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud regarding hunting of houbara bustard’ prepared by Jaffar Baloch, divisional forest officer of the Balochistan forest and wildlife department, Chagai at Dalbandin, says the prince hunted for 21 days – from Jan 11, 2014 to Jan 31– and hunted 1,977 birds, while other members of his party hunted an additional 123 birds, bringing the total bustard toll to 2,100, sources said.

They said that hunting of the internationally protected bird was banned in Pakistan also, but the federal government issued special permits to Gulf states’ royals.

Permits, which are person specific and could not be used by anyone else, allow the holders to hunt up to 100 houbara bustards in 10 days in the area allocated, excluding reserved and protected areas.

The report dated Feb 4, 2014 (No: 216-219 HB/CHI) says that during the 21-day safari the prince hunted the birds for 15 days in the reserved and protected areas, poached birds in other areas for six days and took rest for two days.

Giving a breakup of date-wise as well as area-wise details of the prince’s expedition, the report says that he hunted 112 houbara bustards in the Gut game sanctuary (Arbe pat) which is a reserved and protected area on Jan 11, 2014.

Also read: Houbara bustard butchery | An eulogy for 2,100 bustards

The next two days on Jan 12 and 13th he hunted 116 and 93 birds in the Gut game sanctuary (Sai Rek) which is also a reserved and protected area. Then for the next two days Prince Fahd, who is also governor of Tabuk, visited Sato Gut and hunted 82 and 80 houbaras on Jan 14 and 15, respectively. On Jan 16, he visited Gut-i-Barooth and hunted 79 houbaras. Both these areas are not protected areas, says the report.

For the next six days the Saudi royal camped in the Koh-i-Sultan state forest, which is a reserved and protected area, and hunted 93, 82, 94, 97, 96 and 120 houbara bustards on Jan 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22, respectively.

On Jan 23 and 24, he continued his hunting spree in the Gut game sanctuary (Dam), which is a reserved as well as protected area, and hunted 116 and 197 houbara bustards, respectively.

The prince carried out hunting of the protected bird in Thalo Station and hunted 89 houbara bustards on Jan 25 and spent the next two days hunting the birds in Pul Choto, killing 34 and 89 birds on Jan 26 and 27, respectively. Both of these areas are neither reserved nor protected, says the report.

The remaining four days, Prince Fahd spent in the Gut game sanctuary, a reserved as well as protected area, and hunted 92, 94, 119 and 97 birds on Jan 28, 29, 30, and 31, respectively. The royal guest took rest on Feb 1 and 2 at the Bar Tagzai base camp after bringing the grand total of his trophies to 1,977.

The report says: “123 birds were hunted by local representatives and other labourers of the hunting party. The total bustards hunted by Prince Fahd bin Abdul Sultan bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud are 1,977 and total bustards hunted by local representatives and other labourers are 123 bringing the grand total to 2100”.

See also here. And here.

This reminds me of Spanish dictator Francisco Franco’s butchery of partridges.

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Ruddy and non-ruddy shelducks and hobby


Grey heron, 21 April 2014

Just after the two little ringed plovers of my earlier blog post, on 21 April 2014 in the “Baillon’s crake reserve”, this grey heron.

Greenfinch, 21 April 2014

A greenfinch on a small tree.

Northern lapwing chick, 21 April 2014

Then, three still very small northern lapwing chicks on a muddy shore.

We hear the lesser whitethroat, but don’t see it, unlike two days ago here.

Ruddy shelduck, 21 April 2014

In the northern meadow, a rare bird: a ruddy shelduck. It grazes. eventually, an Egyptian goose drives it away.

Hobby flying, 21 April 2014

A hobby flies past. Also, an unusual species here.

As we go back along the other side of the southern lake, we see barnacle geese. And a muscovy duck.

Shelduck male, 21 April 2014

In a lakelet, a shelduck couple. While a redshank wades between them.

Shelducks flying, 21 April 2014

Later, the shelducks fly away (with the female on the foreground of this photo).

Hare, 21 April 2014

Not far away, a hare.

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Reed buntings and little ringed plovers


Reed bunting male, 21 April 2014

On 21 April 2014, again to the “Baillon’s crake reserve”. There were many birds which we did not see there two days ago; like this male reed bunting.

Hybrid goose, 21 March 2014

Near the entrance, a strange goose. Looking like a bar-headed goose, but with only one bar, not two, on its head. A hybrid between a bar-headed goose and another goose species?

Grey lag goose gosling, 21 March 2014

Many grey lag geese with goslings.

A male common pochard swimming.

A male tufted duck.

Two adult coots with three chicks.

Above the southern lake, two common terns flying. My first common terns of this spring; probably returned recently from Africa; maybe even South Africa.

Moorhens mating, 21 April 2014

Near the northern end of the southern lake, two moorhens mating, with the female’s head under water for some seconds.

Then, a male reed bunting singing in a small tree. While the female perched on a reed stem not far away. Sometimes, they changed position.

Three coots, 21 April 2014

A bit further, coots quarreled about nesting sites.

On the northern lake, northern shovelers and teal swimming.

A barn swallow flying.

Black-tailed godwit, 21 April 2014

A few black-tailed godwits are left, now that their spring migration is almost over.

A redshank flies, and lands.

Gadwall couple, 21 April 2014

A gadwall duck couple.

Little ringed plover, 21 April 2014

Two little ringed plovers in mating season mood on a muddy islet.

Stay tuned, as there will be more about this nature reserve on 21 April!

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Long-tailed duck spring hunting now banned in Finland


This video is called Long-tailed Duck, (Clangula hyemalis).

From BirdLife:

BirdLife Finland succeeds in court battle over endangered species

By Rebecca Langer, Tue, 15/04/2014 – 10:35

The Long-tailed duck is classified worldwide as endangered. In southern Finland, a license for spring hunting of the species was authorized in year 2011, further threatening the survival of the population. BirdLife Finland and its local member organization are working to save the species and lodged a complaint to the Supreme Administrative Court of Finland. The complaint proved successful as the Court found the license for spring hunting illegal.

The court decision was based on the unfavourable conservation status of the species and the fact that there is a satisfactory alternative to spring hunting since Long-tailed duck occurs in the area also during the autumn.

Pursuing the complaint required considerable work by the NGO´s: the appeal documents were lengthy and were supported by numerous expert statements, boat research expeditions and long-term monitoring data collected by volunteers at bird research stations. Results of Long-tailed duck counts carried out by neighboring BirdLife Estonia also helped to prove that the population had decreased considerably.

The majority of the long-tailed ducks breeding in northern Europe and western Siberia spend the winter in the Baltic Sea. These birds occur on the coast of Finland especially during spring and autumn migration. What happens to the birds during spring migration in Finland has impacts on the entire Eurasian population of the species.

The BirdLife Partnership hopes that the positive decision by the Finnish Court helps to preserve the species, not only in Finland, but everywhere it migrates.

Legality of spring hunting under fire in Malta and Brussels: here.

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Good Seychelles conservation news


From BirdLife:

Cousin Island Special Reserve – a success story

By Martin Fowlie, Tue, 15/04/2014 – 11:23

This video tells the conservation success story of Cousin Island Special Reserve, a former coconut enterprise now turned nature reserve in the Seychelles. Managed by local NGO and BirdLife Partner, Nature Seychelles, Cousin lies approximately 2 km from Praslin Island, Seychelles. The island became the World’s first internationally-owned reserve in 1968 when it was purchased by the International Council for the Protection of Birds (now Birdlife International) to save the last remaining population of the Seychelles warbler.

Cousin at the time had been cleared of its native vegetation and planted wall to wall with coconuts. Pigs, chickens and cattle had been introduced. Soon after its purchase, the Seychelles Government designated the island as a Nature Reserve under the Wild Animals and Birds Protection Act. In 1975, Cousin was designated a Special Reserve. This included the marine area up to 400m beyond the High Water Mark. Today, Cousin Island is a bird sanctuary; home to many endemic land birds and an important breeding site for seabirds. It is the most important rookery for Hawksbill turtles in the Western Indian Ocean. The island has been successfully restored to its natural vegetation and has received international awards for its conservation efforts and eco-tourism initiatives.

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