Bolivian endangered parrots helped by nestboxes


This video from Bolivia says about itself:

Nestboxes Save Macaws!

12 May 2017

In 2017 nine Critically Endangered Blue-throated Macaw chicks have successfully hatched from Armonia’s nest box program. The news is especially encouraging as this is the first time we recorded a chick whose both parents had also fledged from nest boxes. . This clearly shows Blue-throated Macaws are learning to identify nest boxes as a safe place to breed. (Footage: Aidan Maccormick, Editor: Márton Hardy, Soundtrack: Montuno – Latin music no copyright music).

From Birdlife:

21 Aug 2017

Critically Endangered macaws are learning to trust artifical nest boxes

This year, nine Blue-throated Macaw chicks have successfully hatched from nest boxes erected by Armonía (BirdLife in Bolivia) – including the first-ever second-generation nest box fledging.

Found only in the Llanos de Moxos – a tropical savanna in northern Bolivia – the striking Blue-throated Macaw Ara glaucogularis was nearly trapped to extinction as a result of demand for the cage bird trade, until 1984, when live export of the species from Bolivia was banned.

But while that threat has been reduced (if not entirely eliminated), the remaining Blue-throated Macaw population, estimated to be in the low hundreds, faces a significant hurdle in its attempts to rebound. The entirety of its known breeding range is situated on what is now private cattle ranches, and the resultant tree-felling and burning has left the Blue-throated Macaws – picky nesters by necessity – short on viable options.

Blue-throated Macaws prefer trees with spacious cavities to nest in, but 150 years of cattle-ranching has resulted in the clearing of most of the larger trees in the region. The beleaguered species has been recorded to suffer a high rate of nesting failures in recent years, with predation from species such as Southern Caracara Caracara plancus and Toco Toucan Ramphastos toco cited as one of the main factors.

However, since 2006, Asociacion Armonía (BirdLife in Bolivia), the Blue-throated Macaw Species Champion, have been working to boost the species’ nesting options. With support from the Loro Parque Fundación, Bird Endowement – Nido Adopito – El Beni-Factors ™ and the Mohammed bin Zayed Conservation Fund, Armonía has erected numerous next boxes across the southern part of the Blue-throated Macaw’s breeding range, to great effect. In the eleven years since the programme has been running, 71 chicks have successfully hatched – a significant number for a species with such a tiny (50-249) estimated adult population.

This year, nine Blue-throated Macaw chicks fledged from Armonia’s nest boxes – one of which represented a significant milestone in our attempts to save this Critically Endangered species – our first-ever second-generation nest box fledging. Both of its parents were themselves hatched in a nest box seven years ago, and the pair have now returned to raise their own offspring in the same boxes.

Macaws are intelligent birds and much of their behavior is learned from their parents. We are confident that once a macaw pair breeds in a nest box, their offspring will learn this behaviour. – Bennett Hennessy, Development Director, Armonía.

Armonía are now working to improve and expand upon this programme. In 2014, Armonía installed 67 nest boxes in a potentially successful site in the Barba Azul Nature Reserve, where currently Blue-throated Macaws forage and roost, but do not yet breed. It is hoped that in time, these intelligent birds will adjust to the presence of these artificial cavities and begin breeding within this protected area.

Also, Armonía are also constantly revising their nest box designs to better suit the needs of the species as new insights become available. The discovery of a new breeding site this past February has given Armonía furtherinformation on the Blue-throated Macaw’s preferred nesting conditions; as a result, future designs will be taller and more isolated to reflect their preferences.

Pileated woodpeckers, other birds in New York, USA


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Pileated Woodpeckers on Cornell Feeders – August 21, 2017

As one Pileated Woodpecker snacks on suet, watch a second Pileated Woodpecker make its way over from the wooden post to the top of the Cornell feeders.

Watch LIVE at http://AllAboutBirds.org/CornellFeeders for news, updates, and more information about the pond and its surroundings.

This FeederWatch cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.

Young long-eared owls


This 17 August 2017 video is about young long-eared owls in Friesland province in the Netherlands.

Ben ter Mull made this video.

Recovered young cuckoo freed


This 18 August 2017 video shows the freeing of a young cuckoo after rehabilitation, in the Ooijpolder nature reserve in Gelderland province in the Netherlands.

This young bird grew up in a reed warbler nest in the Ooijpolder. It was the first young cuckoo ever to be on a webcam. Unfortunately, the cuckoo fell out of the nest, damaged by storm. It was brought to a bird hospital. The cuckoo’s reed warbler foster parents started a new nest. Meanwhile, the young reed warblers have fledged.

And now, after convalescence, the young cuckoo has fledged as well.

Wild California condor visits man who saved it


This video from the USA says about itself:

Large condor regularly visits man who saved its life as a baby

13 June 2017

The condor was nursed back to health by the man after the bird fell from his mother’s nest as a baby.

And the condor clearly didn’t forget his rescuer, as video footage shows the pair greeting each other with hugs and one big warm embrace, after the condor returned.

After being rescued, the condor – the largest bird in North America – was then able to learn how to fly and return to normal life.

It is not unusual for the condor to fly back and visit its rescuer, and according to locals the bird is said to return to visit the man fairly frequently.

Whitethroat sings, video


This 17 August 2017 video is about a whitethroat singing.

Roelke Nieweg made this video in Alde Faenen nature reserve, Friesland province in the Netherlands.