Anna’s, Rivoli’s hummingbirds in Texas, USA


This video from Texas in the USA says about itself:

What’s In A Name: Anna’s and Rivoli’s Hummingbirds – Sept. 12, 2019

Did you know the names of the Anna’s and Rivoli’s Hummingbird are connected? When these species were described in 1829 by French naturalist René Primevère Lesson, he named these dazzling hummers in honor of the Duke of Rivoli and his duchess, Anna de Belle Masséna. Watch a flashy male Anna’s alight on the back right feeder port before a male Rivoli’s steals the spotlight on the back left of the feeder.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

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Lucifer hummingbird at Texas, USA feeder


This video from the USA says about itself:

Male Lucifer Hummingbird Soaks Up Camera Time In West Texas – Sept. 8, 2019

Lucifer Hummingbirds feed on the nectar of flowering desert plants, especially agave flowers. They also sip sugar solution in hummingbird feeders, but they have a low rank among the other species and are often chased off by other hummers.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is sponsored by Perky-Pet®.

Rufous and Lucifer hummingbirds in Texas, USA


This video from Texas in the USA says about itself:

Male Lucifer And Rufous Hummingbirds Sit Next To Each Other During Feeding Frenzy – Sept. 6, 2019

Flashy male Rufous and Lucifer Hummingbirds alight next to each other during a morning feeding frenzy. Skip to 1:34 to see them on the right side of the feeder.

Texas, USA, hummingbirds back on the internet


This video from the USA says about itself:

The West Texas Hummingbird Cam Returns! – Sept. 4, 2019

The jewels of West Texas are back! The West Texas hummingbird cam sponsored by Perky-Pet has returned to an all-new site tucked away in the Davis Mountain range. Tune in now to observe over a dozen species of bejeweled hummingbirds fuel up along their fall migration routes as they fly south to warmer climates.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA today:

The Wait Is Over: The West Texas hummingbird cam sponsored by Perky-Pet has returned to an all-new site tucked away in the Davis Mountain range. Tune in for a chance to observe over a dozen species of hummingbirds fuel up along their fall migration routes as they fly south to warmer climates. Prepare to be dazzled by the orange glow of a Rufous Hummingbird or the Lucifer Hummingbird‘s uniquely curved bill as they sip nectar from the many feeding ports of the Perky-Pet Grand Master hummingbird feeder hosted by the hummingbird experts at West Texas Avian Research. Tune in live.

Learning Who’s Who: With the hummingbird-heavy autumn season underway, the cam’s up-close view provides a great opportunity to key in on the specific characteristics that differentiate the several species visiting the feeder. If the light hits right, the iridescent throat patches (i.e. gorgets) of adult males will giveaway their identity in a flash, but their comparatively drab female counterparts can be much harder to tell apart. Check out the “Species Info” tab underneath the live stream for a list of commonly seen species.

Young Birds Muddy The Waters: Many immature hummingbirds will be making their first southern migrations this time of year, which can throw a wrench into the hummer ID process. In most cases, immature birds resemble adult females with slight plumage differences. If you are having trouble telling some birds apart, don’t get discouraged. It can be extremely difficult to distinguish some female and immature birds with the naked eye.

Tools To Help: Check out the online Bird Guide from All About Birds for an in-depth look at each hummingbird species on cam. Browse photos, read up on the four keys To ID each bird correctly, and compare similar species with side-by-side photos and descriptions. Want to compare all the species in one place? Download this Hummingbirds of North America poster from our friends at Project FeederWatch. What are you waiting for? Start studying up on the jewels of West Texas!