Bullock’s oriole at Texas hummingbird webcam


This video from the USA says about itself:

27 April 2017

Another first-timer arrived on the West Texas Hummingbird cam this week when this Bullock’s Oriole displaced a Black-chinned Hummingbird for a short drink at the feeder. These flame-orange songbirds can be found in most of the western U.S. during the breeding season. Bullock’s Orioles eat insects and other arthropods, as well as fruit and nectar, and it’s not unusual for them to raid hummingbird feeders for their sugar-water.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

Acorn woodpecker at Texas hummingbird webcam


This video from the USA says about itself:

Acorn Woodpecker Close Up in West Texas – Apr. 21, 2017

21 April 2017

Watch an Acorn Woodpecker perch right in front of the cam while taking a drink. Soon after a female hummingbird with nestling material in her bill visits the feeder.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky Pet Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Texas hummingbird webcam again


This video from the USA says about itself:

20 April 2017

Watch short visits from male Magnificent and Black-chinned Hummingbirds, among others, as the West Texas Hummingbird cam launches its third season.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky Pet Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Humans helping or harming birds with nesting material?


This video from the USA says about itself:

Things to know when you provide hummingbird nesting materials

31 January 2016

If you are watching this footage, then I must say thank you for helping them out. It takes a lot of energy for them to find nesting materials.

Some hummingbird females are more experienced than the others. Those two took the easier route; they simply picked up the already pulled out ones and selected desired sizes right off the ground.

Just like you’d do with the feeders, hang the materials high enough so that cats can’t get to the hummingbirds. In this video where they were near the ground is a section-off narrow corridor that no other animals have easy access to.

If you have a bully claiming your feeders, hang the material away from the feeders so the females won’t be chased away.

If you want to reduce the probability of other species of birds building nests around your home and thus discourages female hummers selecting nesting sites around your home, try position the nesting material flush underneath a flat surface so only the birds that can hover, namingly hummingbirds, have easier time to get the material.

Hang the material so that it won’t be affected by the rain. Don’t forget to fluff it up before you hang it to make it easier for hummingbirds to pull it out. IMPORTANT: Please replace it every year! The material serves as a filter that traps pollutants and mold spores that will potentially cause respiratory illnesses. The illnesses may not become apparent until a few weeks later when the chicks have already fledged.

If you do happen to have a female built a nest near your home, please remove the electrical cords (such as Christmas string lights) so they don’t perch on them. Lead from the electric wires poses a real lead poisoning threat.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Providing Nesting Materials: Dos & Don’ts

Birds’ nests are works of art, woven fibers and sculpted mud. Sometimes those gorgeous nests contain human-made materials such as cotton threads or plastic tinsel. Even your dog’s fur or a horse’s mane can be incorporated into a bird’s nest.

It is tempting to provide these easy-to-gather materials for birds; however, new evidence from wildlife rehabilitators suggests that caution is warranted when putting out nesting materials. Even fur and other seemingly innocuous materials can tangle and entrap adults and nestlings. In light of this new data, the Lab has recently revised its list of Dos and Don’ts for providing nesting materials to birds. Do your part and keep birds safe this nesting season!

Do provide any combination of the following: dead twigs and leaves, dry grass (make sure the grass is chemical-free), feathers, plant fluff or down (e.g., cattail fluff, cottonwood down), moss, bark strips, and pine needles.

Don’t provide: plastic strips, tinsel, cellophane, aluminum foil, dryer lint, animal fur or hair (including human hair), yarn, felt, or bits of cloth.

Whales’ and hummingbirds’ hearts


This 2016 video is called Super hummingbirds.

From eNatureBlog in the USA:

Who’s Heart Is Bigger? A Hummingbird’s Or A Blue Whale’s?

Posted on Thursday, January 26, 2017

Think those heart-shaped boxes of Valentine’s chocolates are impressive? Compared to the size of a human heart perhaps. But a whale’s heart dwarfs even those samplers that require weightlifters to hoist them.

Picture a heart the size of a car. That’s what a Blue Whale possesses—a heart that deserves its own parking space.

And how does a heart like that pump? Very slowly. In fact, a Blue Whale’s heart beats just five or six times per minute when the whale is at the surface and even slower when the animal dives. A human heart, by contrast, typically beats seventy times per minute at rest. And a hummingbird’s heart, for even greater contrast, beats five hundred times per minute at rest and more than a thousand times per minute when the bird flies.

But don’t underestimate the little hummingbird. Its heart is the largest proportionally of any animal. Whereas the average mammal’s heart comprises less than 1 percent of its total body weight, a hummingbird’s heart can be more than twice that figure. For a Blue Whale, that’s the equivalent of a two-car garage.

Young hummingbirds fledge, video


This video says about itself:

Both Green-and-white Hummingbird nestlings fledged on New Year’s Day, 2017, from their nest next to the Andean Bear Rescue Center at Machu Picchu Inkaterra.

The Green-and-white Hummingbird cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Inkaterra Asociación. Very little has been published about this small species of hummingbird endemic to the eastern Andean slopes of central Peru.

Young hummingbirds test their wings


This video from Peru says about itself:

Intense Flapping at the Green-and-white Hummingbird Nest, 31 Dec 2016

One of the nestlings nearly takes off while practicing flying on the edge of the nest.

The Green-and-white Hummingbird cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Inkaterra Asociación. Very little has been published about this small species of hummingbird endemic to the eastern Andean slopes of central Peru.

Watch live anytime here.

Green-and-white Hummingbirds are locally common through their range and inhabit the canopy of humid forests, forest borders, clearings, and second growth. Its breeding biology is thought to be similar to other Amazilia hummingbirds, with an incubation period of 15-16 days followed by fledging at 18-22 days. Only the female adult cares for the nestlings, and she feeds them a steady diet of insects and nectar gathered from nearby the nest site.

Unfortunately, rates of nest predation for open-cup nesters in the tropics are very high—only around 18% survive to fledge. Eggs hatched around December 3 or 4 …

The cam situated on the expansive grounds of the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in Aguas Calientes, Peru, near Machu Picchu.