Rivoli’s hummingbird in Texas, USA


This video from Texas in the USA says about itself:

Male Rivoli’s Hummingbird Sparkles While Sipping Nectar – Oct. 5, 2018

Wouldn’t it be great if we could all look this majestic while eating a meal? It comes naturally for the male Rivoli’s Hummingbird. In the right lighting, these hummers reveal their spectacular metallic teal throat patch and purple crest. It’s not surprising that this species was known as Magnificent Hummingbird from the 1980s until 2017.

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Texas, USA hummingbirds in the morning


This video from the USA says about itself:

Full Feeders On West Texas Hummingbird Cam – Sept. 26, 2018

The feeders are full and things are humming along this morning in the Davis mountains.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

New hummingbird species discovered, endangered


Blue-throated hillstar, photo F. Somoza

From the American Ornithological Society Publications Office:

Newly discovered hummingbird species already critically endangered

September 26, 2018

In 2017, researchers working in the Ecuadorian Andes stumbled across a previously unknown species of hummingbird — but as documented in a new study published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, its small range, specialized habitat, and threats from human activity mean the newly described Blue-throated Hillstar is likely already critically endangered.

Hillstars are unusual among hummingbirds — they live in high-elevation habitats in the Andes and have special adaptations to cold temperatures. Francisco Sornoza of Ecuador’s Instituto Nacional de Biodiversida, first observed and photographed a previously unknown hillstar during fieldwork in southwest Ecuador in April 2017. After this first expedition, Francisco engaged fellow researchers Juan Freile, Elisa Bonaccorso, Jonas Nilsson, and Niels Krabbe in the study of this possible new species, returning in May to capture specimens and confirm the finding. They dubbed the new species Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus, or the Blue-throated Hillstar, for its iridescent blue throat.

The Blue-throated Hillstar is found only along bush-lined creeks in an area of about 100 square kilometers, and the researchers estimate there are no more than 750 individuals, perhaps fewer than 500. Threats to its habitat include fire, grazing, and gold mining, and it meets the criteria to be considered critically endangered. “Complete support from national and international conservation agencies is needed in order to save this species,” says coauthor Francisco Sornoza-Molina. “The action plan for the conservation of this bird is creating a network of protected areas along its geographic range.”

“The hillstar hummingbirds occur in the most rugged, isolated, and inaccessible parts of the Andes, where they roost in caves, forage on the ground, and spend half their lives in hypothermic torpor, so the discovery of a new species in this group is incredibly exciting. This striking discovery confirms that life in the high Andes still holds many secrets to be revealed”, according to the University of New Mexico’s Christopher Witt, a hummingbird expert who wasn’t involved in the study. “The location is fitting for a new species of hillstar, because it’s a remote, high mountain range that is isolated and is sandwiched between the ranges of two other hillstar species. The authors did a thorough job comparing the new form to its relatives in every respect.”

See also here.

This is the strange story behind the animals we know we haven’t yet discovered.

Broad-tailed, black-chinned hummingbirds in Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Male Broad-tailed and Black-chinned Hummingbirds Stop For A Sip In West Texas – Sept. 12, 2018

Broad-tailed (left) and Black-chinned (right) Hummingbirds are two of the most abundant species to visit the West Texas cam site during breeding and migration periods. Both species have resident populations in Mexico and medium-distance migrant populations that travel north to breed in the mountainous regions of the western U.S., and some Black-chinned migrants breed as far north as British Columbia, Canada.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

Many hummingbirds feeding in Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Full Feeder On West Texas Hummingbird Cam – Sept. 7, 2018

It doesn’t take long for a hummingbird feeder to go from empty to full during fall migration in West Texas!

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

Various hummingbirds at Texas feeders


This video from the USA says about itself:

Diverse Visitors Swarm West Texas Feeders – Aug. 20, 2018

Feed your hummingbird needs on the West Texas Hummingbird cam!

Rufous, Ruby-throated, Black-chinned, and Lucifer Hummingbirds round out a diverse crowd at the feeder.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.

Young blue-throated hummingbird in Texas, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Rare Visitor In West Texas: Juvenile Male Blue-throated Hummingbird – Aug. 4, 2018

The aptly named Blue-throated Hummingbird is a giant among its North American counterparts. These behemoths are the largest hummingbirds found north of Mexico, and they are rare visitors to the West Texas Cam site. Enjoy this short visit by a juvenile male, who weighs in at about three times the mass of a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

Watch live at http://allaboutbirds.org/texashummers for more information about hummingbirds and highlights from the feeders.