Hawaii albatrosses dancing


This 10 May 2018 video from Hawaii says about itself:

Adult Albatrosses Hang Out, Practice Dancing In Front Of Camera – May 10, 2018

It’s never too early for a dance party on the Kauai Laysan Albatross cam.

Watch a group of lively adults gather in the early morning hours to practice their elaborate courtship routines right in front of the camera!

The Kauai Laysan Albatross cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Kauai Albatross Network. Watch live with news, updates, and FAQs at http://allaboutbirds.org/albatross.

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Lapwing does not like dancing cranes


This 26 April 2018 video from near Nijkerk in Gelderland province in the Netherlands shows a crane couple which wants to dance on a meadow.

However, they are close to a nest of a northern lapwing, which tries to drive the cranes away.

Jan Willem Schoonhoven made this video.

Great tit dances on ABBA music


As from a house in the Netherlands the ABBA song Dancing Queen plays, outside a great tit dances. Dancing is important in the great tit mating season.

Desiree van den Broek in the Netherlands made this 20 April 2018 video.

Religious bans on films, dancing in Germany


This video from South Korea says about itself:

18 August 2017

Kpop Banned Dance: MV vs LIVE

Korea’s biggest broadcasting companies have strict rules and standards on what lyrics and dance moves can be performed. If they feel a dance move is too explicit idols groups must change it in order to perform. The following dances listed below were deemed inappropriate for live stage, therefore they changed it. In some cases they don’t change everything but the camera will focus elsewhere during those moves. It’s important to note that not all channels banned these dance moves, each broadcasting company is different to the others.

‘Kpop vs’ playlist: here.

Intro and outro song: D.Holic – Chewy

1. AOAMiniskirt
【During live performance when they had to dance that part they only did the hand gesture because the skirts were pre-unzipped】
2. AOA – confused
3. HELLOVENUS – WiggleWiggle
【Instead of twerking they moved their butts side to side. Also in their dance practise video they lift their shirts up, this didn’t make it on live performances】
4. Dalshabet – Be Ambitious
【Korean broadcasting companies must view girls revealing skin as stripping because it’s not the exposure that’s the issue it’s the action of taking a cloth off or revealing more skin that gets banned. Dalshabet had to drop the tear away dance and only do the hand action】
5. Dalshabet – BBB
6. Dalshabet – Joker
【Joker had many controversies, first the Korean pronunciation for joker sounds an awful like a Korean cuss for big ‘you know what’ and the dance didn’t help when they were touching their crotch area】
7. Tara Jiyeon – never ever
8. Rania – DR Feel Good
【the up and down movement while they were kneeling down was banned they end up just holding the downwards move awkwardly】
9. Sunmi – full moon
【1 second of a female idol spreading her legs is enough to ban it and force then to change the dance】
10. Rainbow – A
11. Rainbow Blaxx – Cha Cha
12. Stellar – Marionette
【Stellar is no stranger to bans and their company is partly at fault there. Their butt rub was changed to a more tamed butt lift move】
13. Stellar – Vibrato
14. L4 – move
【these girls didn’t perform this on broadcasting at all but when they did at a live performance everything was changed】
15. Fiestar – One More
【this song also caused controversy for their suggestive lyrics about a threesome as for the dance, they removed the kneeling in front of the guys】
16. Fiestar – You’re pitiful
【no dance move goes unseen, the quick dance where they go down and bounce was banned】
17. Gain – Paradise Lost
【so much was changed in this and its looks evident as the original dance was perfectly matched to the song】
18. Sistar – how dare you
【this song is old because if they danced it now it would be accepted however the standard for what appears on TV was more strict back then. A simple butt rub wouldn’t pass】
19. Sistar – so cool
20. Exid – up down
【the famous hip dance was banned for being sexually suggestive, instead they move their hips sideways】
21. Hyomin – nice body
【most of the butt dance was accepted surprisingly, however the ending had to be done facing the camera】
22. Girls day – something
23. After school – first love
【surprisedly most broadcasting companies allowed the pole dancing to be aired, however not all but they did allow them to dance with chairs】
24. Hara – Choco chip Cookies
25. 4minute – mirror mirror
26. Hyuna – roll deep
【there’s no surprise hyuna would be on this list, after all her song bubble pop had to end early due to it being banned and it was no different for roll deep, luckily she changed the dance rather the stop promotions】
27. Brown eyed girls – Abracadabra
【not only did the MV get banned for having a lesbian theme but so did the dance as it was too explicit for TV】
28. Secret – poison
29. Cross gene – amazing/bad lady
【The crotch rub just too sexual even for a male group】
30. VIXX – VOODOO DOLL

Germany is a secular country, where there is separation between state and (Christian) church? Think again …

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Dancing and watching New Kids Nitro is illegal in Germany today

Who goes to the cinema on Good Friday in Germany will have to do with a film that fits the Christian holiday. In addition to the ban on dancing, which applies in some federal states, there is also a film display ban on more than 700 films. Among the illegal films are King Kong, Terminator and the Dutch film New Kids Nitro. Two years ago, a cinema in Bochum was fined 100 euros when The Life of Brian

a Monty Python comedy, considered ‘blasphemous’ by fundamentalist Christians

was screened.

The ban on dancing and films in Germany stems from the idea that the passion of Jesus Christ must be commemorated in peace. …

Since 1952, a list of prohibited films has been kept. According to the FSK [censorship organisation], the films on the list contain a storyline that is ‘unsuitable’. What is not appropriate about them remains vague. The German watchdog does not use a fixed list of criteria. However, ‘blasphemy‘ and ‘immoral behaviour’ are mentioned as a reason to ban a movie ….

There has been discussion about the ban on dancing on Good Friday. For a violation of the ban you can get a 1000 euro fine. Two federal states deal with this flexibly. In Berlin, for example, the ban applies only between 4 am and 9 pm and also in Hamburg partying at night is not illegal.

Mantis shrimp mating dance


This video says about itself:

Watch This Male Mantis Shrimp Dance to Attract a Mate

9 January 2018

Mantis shrimp have a reputation as fighters and it’s well deserved. But they also have a romantic side to them, which they show off with a well-choreographed mating dance. From the series: David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef: Builders.

Isadora Duncan, creator of modern dance


This video says about itself:

Glimpses of Isadora Duncan on film

28 May 2016

Many people have posted on Isadora Duncan on You Tube.

Some, the footage of her rapturously executing the final few steps of an outdoor performance.

Others, photographs of her dancing, images that curiously seem to capture some of the dynamism and modernness of her movement.

There is also disputed footage described by some as Isadora dancing at the Parthenon. Given that the Greek ideal was one of her primary sources of inspiration, the temple in Athens would be a likely place for film to be shot. And certainly there are photographs of Duncan in dance pose at the Acropolis. However, the temple in this footage here is obviously not in Athens, as it is low in altitude and there is sea in the background. And there is no reason to suppose the film is of Isadora herself – so perhaps a disciple, following in her footsteps.

And there’s footage of Isadora on board of a ship with the Russian poet Sergei Yesenin, whom she married in 1922.

Finally and rather morbidly I came across French newsreel footage of the car in which Isadora’s two children met their deaths in 1913 when the car they were traveling in plunged into the Seine in Paris. The talking head over this footage rather gruesomely comments ‘Voyons les enfants’!

All these resources are spread about and seem to justify a post putting them all together.

By Dana Naomy Mills in Britain:

Dancing to a Bolshevik tune

Saturday 4th November 2017

Dana Naomy Mills reflects on how the great dance innovator ISADORA DUNCAN was inspired by her time in the first workers’ state

TO SAY that Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was the creator of modern dance is no exaggeration.

Her pioneering techniques, which broke with the rigid conventions of classical ballet, have inspired choreographers and dancers until this very day and her influence can be seen in the work of Pina Bausch, Martha Graham and Frederick Ashton, among many others.

From her early years as an artist, Duncan was a rebellious spirit. Refusing to accept rules in dance — and life — she discarded ballet shoes and tutus in favour of barefoot movement and loose-fitting costumes.

For Duncan, dance came from the soul and her style of free and natural movement was inspired by the classical Greek arts, folk dances, social dances, nature and natural forces as well as an American-inspired athleticism.

Born in San Francisco and raised in a poverty-stricken family, Duncan was always aware of her surroundings and social justice. “If my art is symbolic of any one thing, it is symbolic of the freedom of woman and her emancipation of the hidebound conventions that are the warp and woof of New England puritanism,” she once said.

After spending time in London and Europe performing to great acclaim and teaching, she was drawn to the monumental events occurring in Russia, a turning point in her own life. In 1921, at the invitation of the first Soviet People’s Commissar of Education Anatoly Lunacharsky, she arrived in Russia. She refused to accept money for her art — Duncan saw the goal of her work in Russia to bring beauty and the new dance to the new world being built.

“Adieu, then, inequality, injustice and the brutality of the Old World,” she wrote at the conclusion of her autobiography just before she left for Russia, “with all the energy of my being, disappointed in the attempts to realise any of my art visions in Europe, I was ready to enter the ideal domain of communism.”

In Russia, Duncan encountered some of the biggest figures of the revolution. Lenin watched her dance to the Internationale with admiration and she danced in front of the grandmother of German communism, Clara Zetkin. She bonded with the feminist-communist revolutionary Alexandra Kollontai over a shared bottle of vodka.

Duncan — motto: “No limits!” — saw dance as a powerful educational mechanism, stating that: “A free spirit can only exist in a freed body.” At the same time, she did not want her art to be “translated” or mediated. “I am not a politician,” she stated. “I am an artist. But I will try in my dancing to help America to understand the magnificent spirit of Russia”.

In bringing dance centre stage without requiring plots, heavy costumes or sets that would distract from the power of the human body, she exposed its essential power and all those who saw her perform remember a magnetic and unique energy and charisma.

At the same time, she always wanted to found a school, realising that dance, the most ephemeral of art forms, needs structure to survive.

She had hoped the huge promise of Soviet Russia would enable her that continuity.

But she left Russia in 1924, disillusioned by the lack of support for her school, the situation in the fledgling Soviet state and the breakdown of her personal relationship with the poet Sergei Yesenin. But her adopted daughter Irma took over the school after she left.

Duncan’s influence on Soviet modern dance was monumental and, in turn, the Russian revolution was a pivotal point in her work to use dance as an educational tool for justice.

Returning to her homeland on tour, in Boston in 1922 she waved a red scarf and declared: “This is red! So am I! it is the colour of life and vigour. You were once wild here. Don’t let them tame you!”

On this anniversary of the Russian Revolution, those words still inspire in the struggle for justice.

We must never allow ourselves to be tamed.

Theatre and dance in Den Bosch city


This June 2017 video is a trailer for the Boulevard theatre festival, 3-13 August 2017 in Den Bosch city in the Netherlands.

After we had arrived in Den Bosch on 10 August, we went to that festival.

First, we went to Eendje (Duckling), a solo play by actress Kim van Zeben.

Kim van Zeben with duckling, 10 August 2017

This photo shows Ms van Zeben during her 10 August Den Bosch performance. A cell phone photo, like the other Den Bosch one in this blog post.

The play Eendje is inspired by the fairy tale The Ugly Duckling, by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen.

But it differs: in The Ugly Duckling a duck family hates one duckling because it is different: bigger and whiter than the others. In a happy end, the ‘ugly’ duckling grows up to be a beautiful swan.

In the play Eendje, a duck family (especially the mother) hates one duckling for being different as well. Not because of looks, but because that duckling does not like bread and would like to live in a house.

In Eendje, Kim van Zeben plays the role of Pia, a radio journalist, doing interviews with humans and, in this case, with the duck Dobber. As a ventriloquist, Ms van Zeben plays the six other roles (dolls) as well: duckling Dobber; its conformist mother; Theo, a sewer rat; a human housing bureaucrat; a guitar playing cat and a chicken.

After a quarrel, Dobber swims away from its family and lands in a sewer. It hates the faeces and urine there. Theo the rat living there likes shit and piss, and drives Dobber away for not liking it.

Dobber asks the human bureaucracy if it can get a house. The duck then has to jump through the bureaucratic hoops of various questions and tasks. The last, decisive, task is: can Dobber ring a doorbell? Dobber tries, but the bell is much too high. Then, Dobber remembers being a bird. It flies up to the bell and rings it. ‘Now, I surely qualify to get a house?’ No, says the bureaucrat, you have flown. Humans cannot fly. So, you are not human and don’t have the right to live in a house. Sad, Dobber has to go away again.

Then, Dobber meets a cat which tries to eat the duck. However, when Dobber talks about being a unusual, nonconformist duck, the cat stops being aggressive. As the cat is unusual and nonconformist as well, being able to play heavy metal music on a guitar. The cat’s girlfriend is a chicken. ‘How ridiculous, a chicken and a cat as a couple’, Dobber says. ‘No, not ridiculous at all’, the cat says. ‘Remember what you yourself went through. It is OK to be different’.

Now, Dobber really understands diversity, and discovers how to live a happy life. The duck can go back to its native wetland; and, as well, build a house there to live in.

After we came out of the tent where Ms van Zeben had performed, we were on the main theatre festival ground.

Boulevard theatre festival, 10 August 2017

Next, we went to a performance by the five dancers of MAN||CO.

This video announces their new thirty minute show The Winner Takes It All; which we saw. It is modern dance with also some spoken word (in English, about a president). Its theme is power, and how it may lead to militarism and oppression. With a hint in the show to, eg, Donald Trump.

Then, we went by bus from the city to the countryside, for a performance of Hallo Dampkring (Hello Atmosphere), by children’s theatre company Artemis.

Hallo Dampkring

The theme of the play is global warming. The text is based on letters about that by children from Terschelling island and the Den Bosch area. It is in the form of a Roman Catholic Requiem. Six children are the actors. The audience sings along in some parts.

The open air stands were full of spectators, who applauded much.