Terns, gulls, oystercatcher photo


Terns, gulls, oystercatcher photo

This September 2016 photo is by amkeizer from the Netherlands.

Most of the birds on this photo are sandwich terns.

The one oystercatcher stands out.

Can you see the two black-headed gulls in winter plumage?

Good red kite news


This video says about itself:

25 November 2010

Photographer and biologist Johan Hammar is photographing red kite (Milvus milvus) from a hide in southern Sweden. Europe holds about 95 % of the world population of red kites but in many countries they are decreasing. In Sweden it was almost extinct. Only 30 pairs remained in 1960. But thanks to nature conservation efforts there are now more than 1300 breeding pairs in Sweden.

BirdLife in the Netherlands reported on 14 September 2016 things are going well for red kites in the Netherlands. In 2014 3 nesting couples; in 2015 8; this year about 10.

However, there is a threat for this species of people poisoning raptors.

In Belgium there are about 200 nesting couples.

Young spoonbill flies differently


Spoonbills flying

This is a photo by Willem de Wolf from the Netherlands, showing spoonbills flying.

The young spoonbill at the front flies differently from the others.

Kingfisher, goshawk and flowers


This is a kingfisher video from the Netherlands.

On 11 September 2016, to Tiengemeten island in the Netherlands.

Before the ferry departed, three spoonbills in a wetland.

Canada geese. Grey lag geese. A barnacle goose.

A great egret. A gadwall duck swims.

Ferry to Tiengemeten, 11 September 2016

As the ferry departs, a kingfisher on the right bank of the harbour. Sitting a bit similarly to the kingfisher in the video, though it sits on a branch about 80 centimeter above the water; not on a pole.

As we cross the estuary, a great cormorant.

As we arrive in the harbour of Tiengemeten, a white wagtail and barn swallows flying.

Tiengemeten, 11 September 2016

We walk.

On the right side a wetland with spoonbills and barnacle geese.

A snipe and ruffs.

A pintail duck, a shoveler and teal.

Wild teasel; the flowers are gone already.

A marsh harrier flies.

Bristly oxtongue flowers.

Tiengemeten plants, 11 September 2016

Chicory flowers.

A kestrel hovers. A goshawk flies.

A stock dove flies.

Two female pheasants.

Many insects in this warm weather, including twin-lobed deerflies.

Tiengemeten ragwort, 11 September 2016

We pass ragwort flowers.

Tiengemeten, on 11 September 2016

Scores of ruddy shelducks swimming.

Tiengemeten landscape on 11 September 2016

A flock of scores of golden plovers flying, with three northern lapwings flying along.

As we arrive at the harbour again, a common gull on a mooring dolphin.

Modern classical music in medieval Dutch church


Choir in Hooglandse Kerk, 10 September 2016

This photo shows the Leids Kamerkoor choir performing in the Hooglandse Kerk, St. Pancras church in Leiden, the Netherlands. Like all photos in this blog post, this is a cellphone photo.

We heard the choir there on 10 September 2016, Heritage Day.

Hooglandse kerk windows, 10 September 2016

The church was built in the late middle ages. It is in Gothic style, as one can see from the tall windows.

Buildings through Hooglandse kerk windows, 10 September 2016

Through the windows, one can see the buildings around the church; many of them ancient as well.

Tombstone, 10 September 2016

On the church floor, many tombstones, from, eg, the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Some of them still legible; some so worn that they are now illegible; some in which a few letters are still legible, like on the left of this photo. The window reflects on the church floor in this photo.

Light through windows, 10 September 2016

Beautiful late summer light through the windows.

The Leids Kamerkoor choir on this 10 September sang twentieth and twenty-first century classical music, from, eg, Dutch and Canadian composers.

In this 2015 video from a concert in Tampere, Finland, the Leids Kamerkoor sang nineteenth century music: “Die Nachtigall” (The Nightingale), by Mendelssohn.

Facebook censors Norwegian Prime Minster on Vietnam war


Kim Phuc with baby in 2005

This photo shows Ms Kim Phuc, who became well-known from a photograph, taken when, as a nine-year-old girl in Vietnam in 1972, napalm bombs injured her. As this 2005 photo of Kim Phuc shows, the napalm scars are still visible and still hurt.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Vietnam photo also deleted from Facebook page of Norwegian Prime Minister

Today, 15:14

The historical photo of the “napalm girl” from Vietnam has not only been removed from the Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten‘s Facebook page, but also from the page of the Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg.

She placed the picture, like many other Norwegians, on her page in protest of Facebook’s removal policy. The company believes that there is too much nudity in the photo.

Solberg has posted a new message in which she expresses the hope that Facebook will change its policy. She writes: “I want our children to grow up in a society where they can learn history as it really was.”

Ms Solberg is a member of the Norwegian conservative party.

But, apparently, not conservative enough for Facebook. Apparently, to Facebook one is only a ‘real’ conservative if, to quote George Orwell’s 1984, one believes that ‘War is peace‘. And if one censors the crimes of the Vietnam war and other wars out of ‘history as it really was’.

UPDATE: after many protests, Facebook gave in and restored the photo.

Facebook whitewashes Vietnam war atrocities


Vietnamese children injured after napalm attack, AP photo

This 8 June 1972 photo shows children wounded by napalm bombs fleeing during the Vietnam war. Among them then 9-year-old Kim Phuc. Ms Kim Phuc, an adult woman now, still hurts from the napalm injuries which United States warplanes flown by the Saigon puppet regime then inflicted on her.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Norwegian newspaper after removal of Vietnam photo: Facebook abused power

Today, 10:38

The Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten has criticized Facebook sharply. In an open letter to their CEO Mark Zuckerberg, chief editor Espen Egil Hansen says that the platform has abused its power. Following the removal of a famous photo from the Vietnam war. Aftenposten is one of the largest newspapers in Norway.

The photo was used by the Norwegian writer Tom Egeland, in a story about iconic war photos. The newspaper reported this story on Facebook. On Wednesday, Facebook told Aftenposten that it would delete the photo.

Then that deletion happened within 24 hours and before the chief editor could respond, he writes. The image was removed according to Hansen because it showed a naked girl, Kim Phuc. When Egeland responded on Facebook to the deletion the platform decided to make it impossible for the writer to post any messages, says Hansen.

“This is serious”

“Listen, Mark,” Hansen writes. “This is serious. First you decide to make no distinction between child pornography and famous war photos and apply your rules without thinking properly. Then you censor criticism and debate about the decision and also punish critics.”

Hansen calls Zuckerberg the most powerful editor of the world. “I am convinced that you abused your power”, says Hansen. “I also think you have thought insufficiently.” Hansen also points to the role of the media in the Vietnam War: they made sure Americans did not get to see the true face of the conflict.

The Norwegian editor asks Zuckerberg what he will do if again terrible images turn up.

Guidelines

Hansen is not the first person criticizing Facebook’s policies. The platform often removes photographs and critics say that is against freedom of expression. Known in the Netherlands is an example of cartoonist Ruben L. Oppenheimer. A drawing by him was removed and then put back.

The guidelines of Facebook say that pictures of naked people will be removed.

Including on famous ancient paintings. Somewhat like Rupert Murdoch and Silvio Berlusconi.

The company always says they do that based on reports from users. The decision to remove a photograph is then taken by an employee of the company. In the case of the Vietnam picture this is startling, because this is a very famous photograph which has been published worldwide on countless occasions.

One of many reasons why I am not on Facebook, including this one and this one and this one, etc.

Meanwhile, eg, the Dutch neonazis of the Nederlandse Volksunie are welcome to spew their racist hatred on Facebook.