Great cormorant eats eel, video


This video from Ireland says about itself:

6 September 2016

Swallowing an enormous elongated fish is not an eating challenge for this most amazing fishing bird; the bird was hungry and dived under the water to hunt for fish. This fishing bird is an expert at catching big fish. The fishing bird spotted an enormous elongated fish under the water and it then attacked the fish. In this amazing predator vs. prey scene the enormous elongated fish battles hard to escape the attack from the hungry predator, but the fishing bird was relentless and it did not stop the attacks until the fish was beaten and exhausted and unable to defend itself anymore. The fishing bird then amazingly swallowed the enormous fish down its specially adapted throat in one huge gulp. Many animals of all shapes and sizes swallow their food whole.

Disastrous drugs for British, Irish soldiers


This video from Ireland says about itself:

Action Lariam for Irish Soldiers

20 November 2014

Please share this important podcast as we hear from ex-Irish Defence Force members highlight the grave circumstances around the use of Lariam. Lariam is an extremely dangerous drug with damaging and long lasting side effects. This show must be heard and spread across Ireland.

Members of the Irish Defence Forces are not legally or constitutionally protected in this matter. They need the people to raise a voice and stand for them and with them in putting an end to this and protecting our fellow country men and women.

Join Action Lariam for Irish Soldiers here.

From daily News Line in Britain:

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Dannatt would not use Lariam, but permitted it to be used on thousands of troops!

FORMER Army chief of staff Lord Dannatt has apologised on the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme for allowing British troops to take an anti-malaria drug despite knowing it can have ‘catastrophic’ mental health effects, and deciding not to use it himself.

The MoD’s doctors prescribed Lariam to more than 17,000 troops between April 2007 and March 2015.

Dannatt told the BBC that his own son had taken the drug and had become ‘extremely depressed’ suffering mental health problems after taking two doses of Lariam. He was not in the armed forces at the time, but had been prescribed the drug by his father’s Army doctor.

Dannatt, who was head of the Army from 2006 to 2009, said the drug’s side-effects – which can include depression and suicidal thoughts – could be ‘pretty catastrophic’. Dannatt said that the MoD was now afraid of opening ‘the floodgates’ to ‘very expensive’ claims.

An ex-soldier Andy told the programme that he was issued with Lariam on the Army’s tour of Sierra Leone in 2000. ‘The effects were almost immediate … I can be a nasty, violent person and I attribute it to this drug. Anything could be misconstrued – a look, a phrase, a word, something completely innocent in someone else’s eyes – but it would be enough to trigger a reaction. A reaction you knew you were doing but you couldn’t stop it.

‘It was as if the wiring in your brain had completely gone. Had I known what the side effects were, I would have taken my chances with malaria. It turned me into an ogre.’

Perhaps this was the quality that the MoD wanted the troops to display to the local population!

In fact, British troops were being treated with contempt as highly expendable cannon fodder. Another fact is that the British ruling class has always treated its soldiery in the same brutal callous fashion and not just in the 19the and early 20th centuries. The development of nuclear weapons saw them tested out not just on Japanese civilians but on British troops and sailors.

Servicemen were stationed to observe the British H Bomb explosions on Christmas Island in the late 1950s, while naval launches were ordered to sail through the blast area. Troops exposed to the blast said that they had no protective gear, but were ordered to turn their backs and cover their faces with their hands. Some reported the flash was so bright they could see their bones through closed eyes, like an X-ray. Others were knocked down by the blast and burned by the heat.

Combat engineer Ken McGinley (founder of the British Nuclear Test Veterans Association) has said that afterwards he was ordered to clean up piles of dead birds and bomb debris. Men went swimming in the lagoon, ate fish they caught in the blast zone, and drank rainwater collected in tarpaulins – oblivious to any risk from radioactive fallout. It was the perfect test on unsuspecting soldiers!

Some servicemen got sick while still on Christmas Island; others became ill after returning home. Some seemed fine for decades before developing cancers and other rare diseases. Nuclear test veterans reported that their wives had high rates of miscarriages and stillbirths, and their children also suffered from birth defects and unusual diseases.

Then in Iraq in 2003, the UK used depleted uranium weapons. ‘UK forces used about 1.9 metric tons of depleted uranium ammunition in the Iraq war in 2003,’ UK Defence Secretary Liam Fox said in a written reply to the House of Commons.

A joint inquiry by Iraq’s environment, health and science ministries uncovered more than 40 sites across the war-torn country contaminated with high levels of radiation. ‘The study that we have conducted does actually prove that there are massive increases in cancer, a 38-fold increase in leukemia, 10-fold increase in breast cancer and infant mortalities are also staggering,’ one of the authors of the report, British-Iraqi scientist Malak Hamdan, said.

The issue is clear. The British army is made up of expendable cannon fodder, as far as the ruling class is concerned.

Small-spotted catshark swimming off Ireland


This video says about itself:

[Small-spotted] Catshark swimming in Howth Harbour in Dublin, Ireland

29 August 2016

[Small-spotted] catshark is a species of shark that can be seen in the sea and ocean that surrounds Ireland and the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The catshark is a predatory shark and it likes to hunt and eat a variety of aquatic creatures. This catshark found its way out off the Irish Sea and into Howth Harbour in Dublin, Ireland. It found a great place to hunt and catch fish when it gets hungry, a predatory shark like this will have no problem catching fish in Howth Harbour.

Dog saves duckling from magpie attack, video


This video from Ireland says about itself:

11 August 2016

A dog saves a [mallard] duckling from an attacking bird and it did not realize that it was saving the duckling’s life. The dog saw the duckling being chased by the bird through a public park and it ran over to investigate what was going on. The dog frightened the attacking bird away and the duckling ran and jumped into the park pond.

The duckling found itself alone when the mother duck took all her ducklings out of the pond to forage in the grass that surrounds the pond. Her ducklings hatched from their eggs a few days ago and were still very small and vulnerable to attacks from the predatory birds that lived in the park, ducklings are prey animals that many predators will attack and eat.

The ducklings had learned how to swim on the water and they were now learning how to walk on the land by following the mother duck as she foraged and encouraged her baby ducks to forage too.

But a predatory bird was watching the mother duck and her babies as they walked around the park searching for food and when one of the ducklings stopped following the mother duck the bird got ready to catch and eat the duckling. The duckling could not keep up with the mother duck and its siblings and had fallen too far behind its mother and the other ducklings and was now alone and unprotected by the mother duck, the mother duck was not aware that one of her babies had become separated from her.

The bird began its attack by running after the duckling through the grass and when it caught up with the duckling it attacked it by pecking at it with its sharp beak, the bird had become aware of the dog that was a short distance away and became more cautious as it attacked the duckling.

… The duckling ran too and jumped back into the pond and swam away to a safe place, it would later rejoin its mother and all the other baby ducks on the pond. The dog had saved the duckling’s life but the dog did not know that its actions were saving the duckling from being caught and eaten by the hungry predatory bird. The duckling never knew that its life had been saved by a dog.

This video from Ireland says about itself:

18 August 2016

A duckling falls asleep on a windy day on top of the mother duck’s back, but then the wind blows and the duckling is blown off its mother’s back and it rolls down a rocky hill. The baby ducks hatched out of their eggs less than a week ago and were still very small and light and were easily blown over by the wind. Every day the ducklings would follow the mother duck around searching for food by walking on the land or swimming in the water. Several times a day the mother duck and the ducklings would take a rest from foraging and fall asleep if they could not stay awake. The ducklings would fall asleep next to and on top of their mother’s back. But sometimes the wind would blow and a duckling would be blown off its mother’s back by the wind.

Irish kestrel hovers, video


This video from Ireland says about itself:

6 August 2016

A kestrel is a bird of prey and a species of falcon that hovers high above the ground as it searches for prey below. It has a hooked bill for eating meat and sharp talons for holding prey and tearing into flesh. Kestrel are carnivorous predatory birds also known as raptors.

Kestrels hunt by hovering high in the air, usually between 35 and 65 feet (10-20 meters) either by flying into the wind or by soaring using ridge lift, they are also known as windhover. When a kestrel spots its prey on the ground it will swoop down from high above and catch the prey with its sharp talons.

Kestrels can see in ultraviolet and are able to spot the urinary trails left by rodents as they come and go from their burrows. The kestrel’s diet is usually small mammals but they will also eat reptiles and insects, invertebrates and sometimes other birds. Kestrels have a brownish plumage and they are small birds of prey. Kestrels are also known as the common kestrel and measure 32–39 cm (13–15 in) from head to tail, with a wingspan of 65–82 cm (26–32 in). Females are larger, with the adult male weighing 136–252 g (4.8–8.9 oz), around 155 g (5.5 oz) on average; the adult female weighs 154–314 g (5.4–11.1 oz), around 184 g (6.5 oz) on average. The common kestrel is also known as the European kestrel, Eurasian kestrel, or Old World kestrel. Kestrel, Falco tinnunculus.

Irish, Dutch grey herons catch rats


This video, from Pijnacker in the Netherlands, shows a grey heron catching a rat.

This is another video from Ireland. It says about itself:

2 August 2016

[Grey] Herons are predatory birds that like to catch and eat rats throughout the day and night when they are hungry, this is amazing feeding behaviour from these birds. Herons hunt and catch and eat rats and other small rodents throughout the day and night as part of the heron’s daily diet. A heron will look closely at the foliage that rats like to forage in and when it spots their movements, the heron will then stand motionless as it watches the rats foraging, its neck then begins to move from side to side as the heron determines the best time to strike with its sharp bill.