Brazilian artists against coup


This video says about itself:

Brazilian Artists Speak Out Against “Coup” Government

30 June 2016

In a nation-wide occupation movement, artists in Brazil fight the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff and lead a protest against newly instated right-wing government.

Homophobic Brazilian politician pro-coup, pro-torture


This BBC video says about itself:

Brazil Truth Commission: Victims revisit torture cells

10 December 2014

Nearly 30 years after the end of Brazil’s military dictatorship, a national truth commission is issuing a report into human rights abuses carried out during that time.

… people were killed or disappeared during the dictatorship and there have been renewed calls for a controversial amnesty law to be repealed.

Some of the women who were tortured at the Department of Political and Social Order have been back to the cells they were held in.

From teleSUR in South America:

Brazil Pro-Coup Lawmaker Probed for Support of Torture and Misogyny

28 June 2016

According to the complaint, Bolsonaro is also a self-declared homophobe and racist, and openly against the rights of LGBT and indigenous communities.

Brazil’s Congress opened an ethics investigation on Tuesday into Jair Bolsonaro, an outspoken lawmaker whose views on torture, rape and homosexuality are sparking concern that the country’s political crisis may foster an authoritarian political revival.

The ethics committee of Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Congress, will try to determine if Bolsonaro, a former Brazilian Army paratrooper, broke parliamentary decorum when he prefaced his vote in April to impeach President Dilma Rousseff with a speech praising Army Colonel Carlos Ustra.

Courts have found Ustra, a notorious Army intelligence officer during the 1964-1985 military regime, responsible for torture. Rousseff, a former left-wing insurgent, was tortured by Ustra’s Army intelligence unit.

For his congressional opponents, Bolsonaro’s backing of Ustra represents support of torture.

During the vote, the only openly gay lawmaker in Brazil’s Congress Jean Wyllys (Party of Socialism and Liberty) spit in Bolsonaro’s face after saying, “In the name of the Indigenous people, of the Black people exterminated in the suburbs, of culture workers, of homeless people, of landless workers, I am voting ‘No to the coup, you crooks.'”

Bolsonaro, Brazil’s fourth-most popular politician according to recent polls and a member of the Social Christian Party, is an extreme example of a broader shift to the right in Brazilian politics in the wake of Rousseff’s impeachment. Small groups of protesters in recent anti-Rousseff street marches were seen carrying signs calling for a return of military rule.

Conservative legislators in Brazil said recently they will back interim President Temer through a growing corruption scandal in return for support for tougher restrictions on abortion and gay rights, looser gun control and more power for farmers

rather: landlords

in disputes with Indian tribes.

A congressional ethics examination and resulting recommendation can lead to sanctions that include removal from office.

Bolsonaro said Ustra was never formally convicted and congressmen have immunity to say whatever they like on the chamber’s floor. Only five lawmakers attended the opening ethics committee meeting.

While Brazil’s constitution protects free speech, laws still exist making speech considered racist or hateful toward identifiable groups illegal. In some cases people have been charged under laws making it a crime to defend the use of illegal drugs.

In the end of April, the Brazilian Union for Writers also filed a complaint against Bolsonaro at the International Criminal Court over crimes against humanity, following his praise of Ustra. They claimed parliamentary immunity could not apply in the case, because Bolsonaro’s words were not related with his position as a lawmaker.

According to the complaint, Bolsonaro is also a self-declared homophobe and racist, and openly against the rights of LGBT and indigenous communities.

Bolsonaro is also defending himself in the Supreme Court against accusations of inciting rape for comments he made in December 2014. He said lawmaker María del Rosario, former Human Rights Minister under Dilma Rousseff was “very ugly” and “did not deserve to be raped.”

The local congress of Bolsonaro’s home city also recently declared him as “persona non grata” after he allegedly insulted the work of the city’s lawmakers.

Spix’s macaw is back in Brazil


This video says about itself:

15 June 2015

Watch our movie on the blue spix macaw and help us to save this beautiful bird from extinction!

From BirdLife:

Spix’s Macaw reappears in Brazil

By Shaun Hurrell, 24 June 2016

It was Grandpa Pinpin’s dream: to see his favourite bird, Spix’s Macaw, fly again over the skies of Curaçá, small town of about 20,000, in the dry Caatinga area in Bahia, Brazil, where goat herding is the main activity. Pinpin Oliveira passed away last year, age 94, his wish unfulfilled. But the baton was passed to his 16 year old grand-daughter, Damily, who not only saw the macaw, not seen in the wild since 2000, but also managed to film it with her mobile phone.

This video says about itself:

24 June 2016

BREAKING. Extinct in the wild? Maybe not. 16-year old Damily has filmed a Spix’s Macaw in the wild! BLU IS BACK.

The BirdLife article continues:

Spix’s Macaw Cyanopsitta spixii is Critically Endangered and possibly extinct in the wild, primarily as a result of trapping for trade plus habitat loss. This famous vibrant blue bird also became the star of the animated film ‘Rio’, as main characters ‘Blu’ and ‘Jewel’.

The bird was first sighted last Saturday. The first person to see the bird was local farmer Nauto Sergio de Oliveira who, as soon as confirmed that is was indeed a Spix’s Macaw, told his neighbours. On the following day, his wife Lourdes Oliveira and her daughter Damilys Oliveira woke up before dawn to look for the macaw in Barra Grande creek’s riparian forest. At 6:20 AM they were able to not only see the bird, but also take a video on Damilys’ mobile phone.

With the video Lourdes contacted the biologists from the Society for the Conservation of Birds in Brazil (SAVE Brasil, BirdLife Partner), one of the organisations that integrate Projeto Ararinha na Natureza (Spix’s Macaw in the Wild Project). The video and the distinctive vocal calls killed all doubts: it was indeed a Spix’s Macaw. Pedro Develey, SAVE Brasil’s Director, immediately told other project members and organised an emergency trip to Curaçá to locate the bird.

“The local people were euphoric,” said Develey. “They set up groups to locate the bird and control any potential dealers from entering.”

“After two years of us with them they are really proud and hopeful for a reintroduction to save the species.”

This individual’s origin is uncertain, quite possibly [it] came from captivity. Since Sunday there have been no more news concerning the macaw, but the project’s biologists and local residents of Curaçá are now mobilised. The area is very large and some stretches have difficult access, which makes it harder to locate the macaw.

According to Ugo Vercillo, Director of Biodiversity of the Ministry of the Environment, another partner organisation of Ararinha na Natureza project, the fact that a Spix’s Macaw appeared in Curaçá’s region reinforces the necessity of protecting this area. Since 2014, Ararinha na Natureza project has been working to create a 44,000 hectares protected area in the municipality to protect the Caatinga and riparian forests.

There has always been a great expectation of the local community regarding the Spix’s Macaw’s return. This macaw’s sighting relights the population’s hope of seeing one of their greatest prides back in the Caatinga.

Next week, an expedition led by Instituto Chico Mendes para a Conservação da Biodiversidade (ICMBio, federal government’s environmental agency responsible for biodiversity conservation) will join the local residents’ efforts on the attempts to locate the bird and obtain the more information as possible.  The expedition is one of the actions of Ararinha na Natureza project, sponsored by Vale, through Fundo Brasileiro para a Biodiversidade (Funbio – Brazilian Fund for Biodiversity).

In parallel to the field efforts, breeding the species in captivity for future reintroduction in the wild is crucial for the project’s success, and counts with the participation of the breeders AWWP (Qatar), ACTP (Germany) and Fazenda Cachoeira (Brazil). Together they maintain 130 Spix’s Macaws and throughout the following years they will provide the first individuals to be reintroduced in Curaçá.

Until the next sighting many questions remain concerning this bird’s origin. How did it reappear in the region? For how long has it been roaming free? How is it adapting to living in the wild? Answers will come in due time. For now just one, thrillingly pleasant thought: a Spix’s Macaw is soaring free, again, in Curaçá’s Caatinga.

“There’s hope again,” said Develey.

Naomi Klein on coup in Brazil


This video from the USA says about itself:

Naomi Klein on the Ousting of President Rousseff

21 June 2016

At the People’s Summit in Chicago, Naomi Klein tells Paul Jay that the suspension of Dilma Rousseff’s presidency in Brazil should be called a coup.