Dutch seventeenth-century art about Brazilian animals


Giant anteater by Frans Post

This drawing, by Dutch painter Frans Post (1612-1680), depicts a giant anteater.

In 1637-1644, Post was in northeast Brazil, then part of the Dutch colonial empire. He painted local landscapes. And he also made 34 drawings of Brazilian animals; these drawings were only recently found again.

From 7 October 2016 till 8 January 2017, there will be in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam in the Netherlands an exhibition showing these drawings, paintings and stuffed animals of the depicted species from the collection of Naturalis museum in Leiden.

Some of the animal species depicted by Post can also be seen alive in Artis zoo in Amsterdam. On 7 October, a drawing contest will start of depictions of these animals by zoo visitors.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Friday, March 4, 2016, 1:30 pm

The Dutch painter Frans Post was the first European-trained artist to paint landscapes in the New World. His depictions of the Dutch colony in northeast Brazil provided Europeans some of the earliest glimpses of South America. After a seven-year stay in Brazil, Post returned to the Netherlands to create for the Dutch art market numerous landscape paintings of this remote and exotic place. James Welu, Director Emeritus of the Worcester Art Museum, in Massachusetts, explores the wealth of information these paintings offer, both about the land that inspired them and the people who acquired them.

Paralympics spectators boo Brazilian coup president Temer


This video says about itself:

Brazil: Temer booed at Independence Day Parade and at Paralympics

8 September 2016

There were jeers from protesters on Wednesday as Michel Temer arrived to take part in his first Independence Day Parade as Brazil’s President.

In office for a week, after Dilma Rousseff‘s removal, national celebrations should have been a happy occasion for the conservative politician, coinciding with the start of Brazil hosting the Paralympic Games.

But not even the presence of Paralympic athletes in the parade in Brasilia could deflect from the discontent being expressed in the capital and beyond.

Read more here.

At the recent Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, spectators booed Brazilian coup president Temer at the opening ceremony. So, Temer did not dare to go to the closing ceremony.

Maybe he thought spectators at the Paralympics, which started in Rio yesterday, would be more uncritical about corrupt politicians.

However, United States weekly Newsweek reports:

Rio Paralympics 2016: Brazil President Michel Temer Booed at Opening Ceremony

The jeers came a day after impeached former president Dilma Rousseff left office.

By Jack Moore on 9/8/16 at 9:12 AM

Brazilians jeered their new President Michel Temer on Wednesday as he attended an Independence Day rally in Brasilia and the opening ceremony of the Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro.

The events were the first official gatherings that Temer had attended since becoming the country’s president on August 31 after Dilma Rousseff was impeached and removed from office …

And it has already started badly for her replacement. Not only because of the jeers as he opened the games, but also fresh protests around the country.

Thousands of protesters descended on almost a dozen Brazilian cities to call for change, with chants such as “Temer Out” and “Usurper” among the calls. Tens of thousands turned out in Sao Paulo, according to organizers, with a smaller gathering of 600 in the country’s capital, Brasilia.

Paralympics tickets are cheaper than for the Olympics, so more not so well off Brazilians are able to attend.

Like at the Olympics, there is also a refugee team at the Paralympics. Syrian swimmer Ibrahim Al Hussein carried its flag. He used to swim in the Euphrates river. His father was a swimming coach. When Al Hussein tried to help another civilian injured in the war in Syria, he lost a leg in the bloody violence. He fled to Turkey, then to Greece, in his wheelchair on a dinghy across the Mediterranean.

Al Hussein, 27, was thrust into the spotlight during the Rio 2016 Olympic Torch Relay, when he carried the torch in Athens, Greece, where he is currently living and training with the help of the Hellenic Paralympic Committee. He will compete in the 50m and 100m freestyle S10 (provisional) as a leg amputee in Rio.