Albatrosses dancing in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

Courtship Dancing in Kauai – Feb. 24, 2017

4 February 2017

Bill-clapping, sky pointing, and whinnying are just some of the cornerstone dance moves used by Laysan Albatrosses in their elaborate courtship rituals.

Red-crested cardinals in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

Red-crested Cardinals – Kauai Albatross Cam – Feb. 13, 2017

The Kauai Laysan Albatross cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Kauai Albatross Network.

Watch live with news, updates, and FAQs at http://allaboutbirds.org/albatross

Red-crested cardinals are originally from South America, and have been introduced to Hawaii.

Nene geese in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

9 February 2017

A trio of Nene, Hawaii’s state bird, forage on the grassy slopes of the property where the albatross colony resides.

The Kauai Laysan Albatross cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Kauai Albatross Network.

Watch live with news, updates, and FAQs at http://allaboutbirds.org/albatross

One albatross mother takes over from other mother


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

1 February 2017

After 3 days out at sea, Pilialoha returns from the ocean with a full belly of stomach oil to take over chick rearing duties from her partner, Mahealani.

The Kauai Laysan Albatross cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Kauai Albatross Network.

Watch live with news, updates, and FAQs at http://allaboutbirds.org/albatross

The first egg at the Laysan Albatross cam site on the North Shore of Kauai has begun hatching on January 23, just in time for the cam to go live! …

This year’s nest features Mahealani and Pilialoha, a female-female pair that spent time incubating an infertile egg on camera last year. Female-female pairs are relatively common in albatross colonies, and their commonness can change with the availability of suitable male mates and the success of prior nesting attempts. This year one of the females in this pair has again laid an infertile egg.

This year, however, several organizations involved in the conservation and management of albatrosses replaced the infertile egg with a fertile one from the Pacific Rim Missile Facility.

Big volcano eruption in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

31 January 2017

Kilauea Volcano lava stream at the Kamokuna ocean entry between 25 – 29 January 2017. According to USGS, “Kīlauea Volcano continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. Lava continues to enter the ocean at Kamokuna and surface flows remain active within 2.4 km (1.5 mi) of the vent at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.”

Laysan albatross nest webcam in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

Laysan Albatross, Kauai, Hawaii, 31 Jan. 2015, 7:28

Good morning, baby.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA today:

The Albatross Season Begins on Kauai

The first egg at the Laysan Albatross cam site on the North Shore of Kauai has begun hatching just in time for the cam to go live! If everything proceeds normally, we expect the young albatross to emerge in the next 24-48 hours. Watch cam.

This year’s nest features Mahealani and Pilialoha, a female-female pair that spent time incubating an infertile egg on camera last year. Female-female pairs are relatively common in albatross colonies, and their commonness can change with the availability of suitable male mates and the success of prior nesting attempts. This year one of the females in this pair has again laid an infertile egg. This year, however, several organizations involved in the conservation and management of albatrosses replaced the infertile egg with a fertile one from the Pacific Rim Missile Facility. Nesting must be discouraged along an active runway there to decrease the likelihood of collisions between the albatrosses and aircraft. Because the egg was saved from a nest at the facility, a young albatross will now have a chance at life with its foster moms.

This effort is part of a larger operation each year when biologists from the U.S. Navy gather eggs from nests at the facility to discourage nesting there. Researchers from Pacific Rim Conservation candle these eggs to assess their fertility. Viable eggs are then substituted for infertile eggs at other nests around the island, as well as helping to establish new colonies. Working together, the Kauai Albatross Network (KAN) and the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources placed 14 eggs at fenced properties with good albatross nesting habitat and landowners who manage for invasive predators such as cats, rats, and pigs.

Hob Osterlund, founder of KAN, played a central role in bringing together these widespread partners, and calls the egg translocation project “a model of cooperation between federal and state agencies along with private landowners and KAN, all working together for the good of the birds.”

Thanks to the hard work of these organizations, the generosity of the cam site landowner, and the support of the cam community, we all get to witness another season in the lives of albatrosses from the garden island. As always, even if you can’t watch, you can follow along with the happenings at the cam site on Twitter and Facebook. Thanks for watching!

Hawaiian crows use tools


This video says about itself:

Tool-time with Hawaiian crows | Science News

14 September 2016

Hawaiian crows have just joined the short list of birds demonstrated to have a widespread, natural capacity for using tools, such as a stick for probing.

GOOD STICKWORK A Hawaiian crow manipulates a twig in its beak to wiggle out a meaty tidbit hidden in a log. Crows dissatisfied with sticks that researchers set out for snagging food sometimes flew into the shrubbery and selected their own tools for the task.

From Science News:

Hawaiian crows ace tool-user test

Second corvid species shows knack for deftly groping with sticks to snag food

by Susan Milius

2:59pm, September 14, 2016

A second kind of crow, native to Hawaii, joins the famous New Caledonian crows as proven natural tool-users.

Tested in big aviaries, Hawaiian crows (Corvus hawaiiensis) frequently picked up a little stick and deftly worked it around to nudge out hard-to-reach tidbits of meat that researchers had pushed into holes in a log, scientists report September 14 in Nature.

“A goosebump moment,” says study coauthor Christian Rutz of his first sight of Hawaiian crows tackling the test. Their nimble handling is “not some little fluke where a bird picks up a stick and pokes it in a hole,” he says. Anecdotes of such flukes abound, especially for crows.  What’s rare are demonstrations that most able-bodied adults in a species show a capacity for tool use in chores important for life in the wild. Because Hawaiian crows are extinct in the wild, Rutz and his colleagues had the bittersweet ability to test literally all adult members of the species. Youngsters too developed tool skills on their own.

Rutz, of the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, has worked with New Caledonian crows, which routinely shape and wield food-snagging tools. These birds, like the Hawaiian crows, are native to remote tropical islands. So is the Galapagos woodpecker finch, one of the handful of other bird species proven expert in tool use. Remote islands may favor the evolution of such capacities, Rutz muses. There are no true woodpeckers to compete with birds for treats in crevices there. And few predators lurk to pounce on a bird distracted with its head practically in a hole.

With its unmistakable fiery red plumage, which was used to decorate the robes worn by Hawaiian royalty in ancient times, the Iiwi Depranis coccinea (pronounced ee-EE-vee), or Scarlet Honeycreeper, is tightly entwined with Hawaiian folklore: here.