Bernie Sanders’ Alaska, Hawaii, Washington victories


This video from the USA says about itself:

Sanders Gains Momentum With Big Wins in Alaska, Hawaii and Washington State

27 March 2016

Next up for the Democrats are key contests in New York and Wisconsin.

Once again, Bernie Sanders has demonstrated, with a trifecta of big wins in Hawaii, Alaska and Washington State, that he has broad and enthusiastic support, especially among the young. Equally astonishing is the large percentage of voters who say they are attracted rather than repelled by Sanders’ embrace of socialism. But if you bother to conduct your own focus group among Americans under 40, neither phenomenon should be surprising. Except for those graduating from elite universities, with either full scholarships or wealthy tuition-paying parents, this is the stunted generation — young adults venturing into a world of work, loaded with student debt, unable to find stable jobs or decent careers: here.

Bernie Sanders: Hillary Clinton’s Fundraising Is ‘Obscene’. He took a swipe at her “big-money” connections: here.

Bernie Sanders scored landslide victories over Hillary Clinton in Democratic Party caucuses held Saturday in Washington state, Hawaii and Alaska. The scale of the defeats for Clinton, the presumptive front-runner in the contest for the presidential nomination, was overwhelming in all three states. In Washington’s caucuses, Sanders beat Clinton by 73 percent to 27 percent. In Alaska, the margin was 82 percent to 18 percent. Sanders won the Hawaii caucuses by 70 percent to 30 percent. The Vermont senator has won six of the last seven Democratic Party contests, including last Tuesday’s victories in Utah and Idaho. Clinton won in Arizona the same day. … Sanders, who has had far less media coverage than the other major candidates, has received 1.5 million votes from those under 30 in the primary process prior to Saturday, 300,000 more than Clinton and Trump combined.: here.

Little bird brings Bernie Sanders big election victories


This is another video about the Portland, Oregon, female house finch’s appearance at the Bernie Sanders United States presidential election rally. Where one sees the bird at closer range than in the other videos in my earlier blog post.

This video says about itself:

Bird At Bernie Sanders Rally Feels The Bern

26 March 2016

Bernie Sanders was giving a speech at a rally when a bird flew on stage. Then onto his lectern. Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, Jimmy Dore, and Jordan Chariton (TYT Politics), hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

“Portland literally “put a bird on it” at a Bernie Sanders rally in Oregon … .

A bird landed on the Democratic presidential candidate’s podium during his speech, and the crowd went wild.

“That bird really is a dove asking us for world peace,” Sanders said.

The “put a bird on it” slogan was made famous by the sketch comedy show “Portlandia.”

Read more here.

The Young Turks commenters mention that this songbird would have been received far less kindly at a Donald Trump rally, deducing from the habitual violence against interlopers at Trump meetings (and, one may say, the enmity between Trump and birds; especially between Trump and bald eagles).

More on this video is here.

The name of the bird at the Sanders rally is house finch in English. In Dutch, it is ‘Mexicaanse roodmus’; literally, Mexican red sparrow. Their scientific name, Haemorhous mexicanus, means roughly the same. A name for it in Spanish is pinzón mexicano, Mexican finch.

The ‘Mexican’ provides another reason why this songbird would have been very unwelcome to Donald Trump. The ‘red’ is more ambiguous. Red is the colour of Trump’s United States Republican Party. But red is also the colour of international socialism; so, an unwelcome reference to Trump’s rival Sanders.

Bernie Sanders’ Bird Shows Us How Great Our Politics Can Be. As Donald Trump gives us the bird, the Bern brings us a dove: here.

Sanders and house finch

Today, there is news of big victories of Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton in Democratic party caucuses in Alaska, Washington state and Hawaii.

The Huffington Post in the USA reports that in Alaska Sanders won 81,6% of the vote with victories in all counties.

In Hawaii (most votes counted, but not all yet), Sanders had 70,6% of the vote. And in Washington state 72,7%; with victories in all counties.

Baby albatross fed, video


This video, recorded in Hawaii, says about itself:

[New born albatross] Kialoa gets fed, Kauai Laysan Albatross Cam, 28 January, 2016

A clip showing the first feeding on cam, in daylight!

It takes some maneuvering, but [father] Ikaika and Kialoa eventually figure it out. The gooey substance Ikaika coughs up is dense, nutritious stomach oil that will help Kialoa grow rapidly.

Laysan albatross chick gets breakfast, video


This video from Hawaii says about itself:

Laysan Albatross Chick Gets Breakfast

1 February 2016

Honua, a two-day old chick, receives a feeding from Mom Moana. Thank you Cornell Lab of Ornithology for the Live Cam. Thank you Kauai Albatross Network for work you do for these incredible seabirds.

Baby albatross born in Hawaii


This video from Hawaii is called Kialoa first day, Laysan Albatross Cam, 28 January, 2016.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA says about it:

Welcome, Baby Kialoa!

The first chick of the season on the Laysan Albatross Cam completed hatching on the morning of January 28. Our volunteer camera operators caught a glimpse of the downy chick under its dad, Ikaika (video above …). The female, Mokihana, is away feeding at sea, but we hope to see her return soon to take over brooding duty and meet her newly hatched chick.

The chick was named Kialoa by a Native Hawaiian scientist. Kialoa means “long, light / swift canoe,” and was named after the amazing long-distance voyaging Hawaiian canoes that so aptly mimic the long-distance foraging flights of these graceful seabirds.

Albatrosses interact with natural elements in ways we aspire to when sailing – wings as sails, body as a canoe, built-in compass, and long-distance mentality. All three chicks expected to hatch on this site will be named in honor of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

Over the next few days, one of the parents will constantly brood the chick, keeping it warm under his or her feathers. It will be fed on dense stomach oil and partially digested food regurgitated from the parent’s belly. Keep watching the cam here to follow Kialoa’s progress!

Hawaii albatross webcams working again


This Midway Atoll video is called Dancing Laysan Albatrosses.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA today:

Over two months ago, Laysan Albatrosses began returning from their epic ocean voyages to the green warmth of Kauai‘s north shore to breed. Mated pairs met up again after long absences, greeting each other with beautiful dances and gentle nuzzling, ready to start anew at the task of successfully raising the next generation of winged spirits. Thanks to the help of the Kauai Albatross Network and a gracious homeowner, you have a front row seat on our Albatross Cam! Watch cam.

This year’s site features four nests on camera (two fertile, two infertile), and a fifth fertile nest just out of view:

Kauai albatross nests

The parents of the central fertile nest, situated in front of the cam under the ironwood tree, are Manawanui (KP796) and unbanded Moana; the egg was laid on November 28, 2015. The parents on the upper nest to the right of Manawanui and Moana are male Mokihana (KP194) and female Ikaika (unbanded), and their egg was laid November 26. There is another fertile nest just out of sight of the camera, downslope; an egg laid on December 3 is tended by parents Ka`imi (KP093) and Lilinoe (KP688). It takes 62 days for a Laysan Albatross egg to hatch, so there’s around a week of incubation left at these nests.

There are also two infertile nests being tended by two female-female pairs: Pilialoha (K097) and Mahealani (KP672) are at the lower nest (beneath Mokihana and Ikaika); and Lawakua and Kiwahiwa are at the nest to the left of Manuwanui and Moana’s nest, near the driveway. Female-female pairs are infrequent but have been well-documented on Kauai and Oahu in the past. Cooperative breeding behavior between unrelated adults is thought to be partially a result of there being more females in the population than males, and can lead to successful breeding attempts, making it a better option than not breeding at all. Though the eggs being incubated at these particular nests are infertile, the adults will continue to care for them until it’s clear they aren’t going to hatch, likely sometime in mid-February.

Last year’s on-camera parents continue to nest at the property that formerly hosted the cam during 2014-2015. We will update about these pairs on Facebook and Twitter as we learn more about their nesting efforts from the Kauai Albatross Network.

You can check out highlights from past seasons or learn more about albatrosses in our FAQs while we await hatch at the new nests. Special thanks to all of the volunteer cam operators and “tweeters” who will be doing their best to make sure that not a moment is missed—thanks for watching!

Unique Hawaiian dolphin videos


This video says about itself:

9 December 2015

You think you know dolphins. We’re about to show you something you’ve never seen before. We guarantee it.

Wild Pantropical Spotted Dolphins, filmed in Hawai’i with unprecedented behavior.

And here is the sequel to that video.

That video says about itself:

Unbelievable Dolphin Encounter – Behind the Scenes

9 December 2015

Here you get the back story about our dolphin video and what went into creating this footage.

Please share with family and friends!! For more information, check out our website at www.SeeThroughSea.com!