Mallard ducklings, video


This video is about a mallard mother and her ducklings.

Rob Veerling made this video between Wageningen and Veenendaal in the Netherlands.

Ducks wintering in Spain, from where?


This video is about migrating northern pintail ducks in Fukushima, Japan. In 2008, before the nuclear disaster there

From Ibis journal:

Geographical origin of dabbling ducks wintering in Iberia: sex differences and implications for pair formation

Natural and anthropogenic Iberian wetlands in southern Europe are well known for supporting large numbers of migratory Palaearctic waterbirds each winter. However, information on the geographical origin of dabbling ducks overwintering in these wetlands is scarce and mostly limited to data from ringing recoveries.

Here, we used intrinsic isotopic markers to determine the geographical origin of male and female Northern Pintails Anas acuta and Eurasian Teal Anas crecca in Extremadura, inland Iberia, a key site for overwintering dabbling ducks. Additionally, we fitted six Northern Pintails with GPS-GSM tags to complement the data derived from stable isotope analysis.

Most (> 70%) first calendar-year Northern Pintails were assigned to regions above 55°N, flying 2600–5600 km from their main natal regions to Extremadura. Mean values of δ2Hf varied significantly between male and female Northern Pintails, suggesting that the sexes had different geographical origins. Data from tagged adult Northern Pintails supported the isotopic data, one male flying more than 5000 km to the coast of the Pechora Sea (Russia). Most (> 70%) first calendar-year Eurasian Teal were assigned to the region between 48° and 60°N, travelling 1500–4500 km to arrive in Extremadura.

Male and female Eurasian Teal showed marginal differences in mean values of δ2Hf. In migratory dabbling ducks, pairing typically occurs on the wintering grounds, and ducks in their first winter can breed the following spring. For Northern Pintails, pair formation in Extremadura could occur between individuals with different geographical origins, which could contribute to the genetic variability of their offspring.

This video from Sweden is about Eurasian teal.

Pygmy hippos help duckling get out of water


This video was recorded on 6 June 2015 in Rotterdam Zoo in the Netherlands. There was a mother mallard duck with ducklings in the pygmy hippopotamus compound.

One duckling landed in the water. It tried desperately to get out. But the bank was to high; it failed.

Then, a pygmy hippo helped to get the duckling out of the water, so it could rejoin its mother.

Zoo visitor Breshna Senchi made this video. At first, she was afraid the hippos would eat the duckling. However, pygmy hippos don’t eat meat.

Red-crested pochard, new species on Dutch island


This is a red-crested pochard video from the Lake of Geneva in Switzerland.

Dutch birdwatcher Debby Doodeman writes about going by boat to De Kreupel, an island in the big IJsselmeer lake, on 17 May 2015.

There, she saw a male red-crested pochard. Maybe, his female partner sat on a nest not far away? Maybe there will be an answer to that, later at De Kreupel.

Red-crested pochards had never been seen on De Kreupel before. About 400 couples of this species nest in the Netherlands.

Ducklings saved by mobile phone ringtone


This video from the USA says about itself:

April 26, 2015

Baby Ducks Rescued from Storm Drain

Slidell, LA. – On Saturday, April 25, 2015 at approximately 5:24 pm, St. Tammany Fire District #1 responded to a call for baby ducks trapped in a storm drain. The incident occurred on Oak Tree Dr. in the Fairways subdivision in Slidell. A neighbor reported seeing a number of baby ducks fall into a storm drain. Upon arriving on the scene, firefighters verified that several baby Mallard ducks were trapped in the storm drain. Firefighters removed the top cover of the drain to gain access to the ducks. Firefighter Cody Knecht got down in the drain to try and capture the ducks. Captain Chuck Davis, Fire Operator Jason Theriot, and Fire Prevention Officer Billy Dekemel assisted from above. With the help of a duck call ringtone on his iPhone, Firefighter Knecht was able to lure the baby ducks to him. It took about an hour and a half to rescue four of the six baby ducks.

Unable to capture the other two baby ducks, the crew went back to the fire station to give the ducks a chance to calm dawn. They returned about an hour later and rescued the two remaining baby ducks. All of the baby ducks were reunited with their mother in the canal behind the home where the incident took place.

St. Tammany Fire District #1 responds to numerous public service calls such as these each year. This is the second duck rescue call in less than a week. Firefighters are always eager to help and enjoy giving back to the community. Fire Chief Chris Kaufmann has stressed to our citizens, “If you don’t know who to call for help, call us”.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Quacking ringtone used by firefighters to rescue baby ducks

The Louisiana fire department spent over 90 minutes coaxing the frightened ducklings out of a storm drain

Alexander Ward

Sunday 03 May 2015

A Louisiana fire department has managed to rescue six ducklings, after they used a duck call ringtone to entice them out of a storm drain.

Thanks to quick thinking by Cody Knecht, a firefighter with St Tammany Fire District, he was able to use his mobile phone to attract the ducklings towards the surface.

But even with the realistic, reassuring quacking sounds, it still took Mr Knecht around 90 minutes to catch the first four baby mallards in the south-east Louisiana community of Slidell.

Chad Duffaut, of the St Tammany Fire District, said that Mr Knecht rescued the other ducklings by allowing them to calm down for about an hour, before reuniting them all with their mother in a nearby canal behind a house where the ducklings were first seen entering the drain.

Wood ducks visit Texas barn owls


This video from the USA says about itself:

Early in the morning of April 20, 2015, a pair of Wood Ducks investigated the Texas Barn Owls‘ box. The female owl responded with a series of aggressive reactions that resulted in the ducks departing.

Phenology and diurnal behaviour of the Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) in the Guerbes-Sanhadja wetland complex (north-eastern Algeria)


petrel41:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/wDrk6YvG6-M?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent

This is a shoveler video from England.

I was privileged to see these beautiful ducks; in western Europe, where they are not rare; and in Svalbard, where they are very rare.

Originally posted on North African Birds:

Amor Abda, W., Merzoug, S., Belhamra, M. & Houhamdi, M. (2015). Phenology and diurnal behaviour of the Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata in the Guerbes-Sanhadja wetland complex (north-eastern Algeria). Zoology and Ecology 25(1): 19–25.  DOI:10.1080/21658005.2014.994361
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Abstract:

An ecological study of the Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata in the wetlands of the Guerbes-Sanhadja eco-complex (Skikda, north-eastern Algeria) which was performed during wintering season (from September 2012 to March 2013) showed that the species was regularly wintering in these ecosystems during the seven months of observation. The highest numbers were recorded during December 2012 (1943 individuals) at Garaet Hadj-Taher, although this wetland was the last to be colonized if we compare it to other wetlands. Garaet Hadj-Taher hosted more than half of the wintering population of the Northern Shoveler in the Guerbes-Sanhadja eco-complex. Sleeping activity (diurnal resting) dominated over other diurnal behaviours of this Anatidea at Garaet Hadj-Taher…

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