Vegan alternative for cruel anti-geese foie gras


This 2012 video is called French Foie Gras CrueltyAnimal Equality Undercover Investigation. It says about itself:

WARNING: The video you’re about to see contains graphic footage. Viewer discretion is advised.

Animal Equality documents the shocking reality of life for ducks and geese confined and force-fed for foie gras production in France.

INVESTIGATION’S FINDINGS:

• Animals confined to small cages in which the animals could not even turn around

• Animals with clear signs of stress and depression

• Evidence of trauma and inflammation of the esophagus – recognised by blood stains on force feeding tubes

• Animals with obvious respiratory problems

• Weak ducks left to die without veterinary care

• Ducks, who appeared fully aware of their situation at the time of slaughter. These animals were flapping, kicking, and bleeding incessantly

• Workers handling animals roughly

• Ducks moving with difficulty due to the size of their livers

France is the largest producer and exporter of foie gras. Over 20,000 tons are produced and approximately 700,000 geese and 37 million ducks are slaughtered by the French foie gras industry each year. Over 4,200 tons are consumed in Spain, and 850 tons are produced. Over 1,150,000 ducks are slaughtered by the Spanish foie gras industry each year.

Today, Dutch NOS TV reports that a vegan alternative to cruel anti-birds foie gras has been developed. Tasting similarly, but without any bird being harmed.

The new vegan foie gras, NOS photo

Belgian restaurant owner Paul Florizoone makes it, based on tofu and cereals.

It is already sold in Belgium. Today, it is introduced in the Netherlands.

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Young hooded merganser ducks in Florida, USA


This video from Florida in the USA says about itself:

2 August 2017

Juvenile Hooded Merganser ducks diving for food give just a hint of the wildly colorful head dress and crests that come with adulthood. They are usually just winter visitors to Florida. These ducks are in captivity, but totally oblivious to humans and having a grand time.

Hooded Mergansers are fairly common on small ponds and rivers, where they dive for fish, crayfish, and other food, seizing it in their thin, serrated bills. They nest in tree cavities; the ducklings depart with a bold leap to the forest floor when only one day old.

Hooded Mergansers dive to catch aquatic insects, crayfish, and small fish. Males court females by expanding their white, sail-like crests and making very low, gravelly, groaning calls. Hooded Mergansers fly distinctively, with shallow, very rapid wingbeats.

Ruddy duck on video


This is a ruddy duck video from the Netherlands.

There, and in other countries, this originally North American species is feral.