Big anti-nazi demonstrations in Germany


This 13 October 2019 AFP video from Berlin, Germany is about the big ‘Unteilbar’ demonstration protesting against the nazi murders in Halle.

From the World Socialist Web Site in Germany:

Large Berlin solidarity protests against anti-Semitism and right-wing terrorism.

By our reporters

14 October 2019

Some 13,000 people protested in Berlin on Sunday against anti-Semitism and right-wing terrorism. After a rally at Bebelplatz, the demonstrators marched to the New Synagogue.

In addition, more than 2,000 people protested in Halle, where a heavily-armed right-wing extremist sought to storm a synagogue last Wednesday and massacre those participating in the observance of Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. The neo-Nazi, Stephan Balliet, fatally shot two people outside the synagogue and wounded several others.

The protests on Sunday followed anti-fascist rallies in cities across Germany on Saturday.

The Unteilbar (Indivisible) initiative called for the demonstration in Berlin under the slogan “Don’t yield an inch! Anti-Semitism and racism kill.”

The statement from the alliance, which is made up of various groups and civil rights organisations, declares: “Right-wing terrorism threatens our society!” The gunman in Halle is not a lone wolf, it continues, explaining that his attack is connected to “fortified militant Nazi structures, the NSU (National Socialist Underground) network, and right-wing networks in the intelligence agencies.” It condemns the “lack of will for transparency” of the police and “non-stop attempts to trivialise the right-wing threat” on the part of politicians and the media.

This weekend’s protests showed once again the widespread opposition that exists to the return of fascism in Germany. The Berlin protest took place on the first anniversary of Unteilbar’s first demonstration, in which 250,000 people gathered at Alexanderplatz following the right-wing extremist rampage in Chemnitz. That rally denounced the rise of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) and the right-wing, anti-refugee policies of the major parties.

As at last year’s mass demonstration, the Sozialistische Gleichheitspartei (SGP) had a strong presence at Sunday’s rally in Berlin. SGP members joined the march, distributed a leaflet headlined “Who is responsible for right-wing terrorism?” and sold copies of the book Why are They Back?, which traces the rise of far-right and neo-Nazi forces and its connection to the turn by the German bourgeoisie to militarism and aggressive imperialist policies. The book also exposes the complicity of the traditional parties of rule in Germany—the Christian Democrats and Social Democratic Party— … in the elevation of the far-right AfD, and the role of far-right academics and university administrations in trivializing the crimes of the Nazis.

SGP supporters at the rally explained how the ruling class has in recent years created the ideological climate and political conditions for right-wing extremist terrorism. They stressed that as in the 1930s, the struggle against fascism requires the independent mobilisation of the working class and a socialist perspective.

World Socialist Web Site reporters interviewed protesters who joined the demonstration out of concern and anger over the attack in Halle.

Jörg, a 51-year-old from Berlin, told the WSWS: “I’m shocked about the murders in Halle. After the attacks in New Zealand and [US] America, it’s now happening in Germany.”

Like many others, Jörg was concerned about the presence of fascist networks in the police, military and intelligence agencies. “It’s certainly significant that the NSU was able to carry out murders in Germany without the domestic intelligence agency doing anything about it. It makes you suspect that something wasn’t right.”

He added that one “cannot rely on the politicians who are now making widely publicised media appearances. Only the people who are gathered here today and the many millions who don’t want fascist terrorism can stop it.”

Angela showing her poster

This poster by Angela says, translated: I am sick of the ‘lone wolf‘ theory. Where are the accomplices, the inspirators, the networks?

Angela, from the group “Grandmothers against the Right”, explained, “I’m here because I find that this tradition, to do nothing against the far-right structures, is unfortunately a tradition with a terribly long history. After every attack, they talk about a turning point, but then nothing changes. I can no longer tolerate it.”

In Germany of all places, she stressed, where Hitlerite fascism raged from 1933 to 1945, carrying out the worst crimes in history, one cannot remain silent. “If we stay silent, we become accomplices. My parents were born in 1904 and 1911 and supported the Nazi Party. I got into conflicts over this. ‘Didn’t you see anything? Why did you stay silent? What was the matter? Even if you lived in small villages, there must have been Jews there as well.’ I don’t want to hear that from my daughter.”

Angela also criticised the established parties and state authorities. The issue is not “lone wolves”, she said, but “right-wing networks”. The “accomplices” and “inciters” sit in government. She said she was “shocked by the right-wing developments for a long time. Since the 1990s, I have protested against the hardening of immigration law, the abolition of the right to asylum, and the watering-down of our Basic Law.”

Camille, a 25-year-old student, expressed the fear that “as a refugee, foreigner or left-winger, you can’t be safe in this country if Nazis can do those sorts of things. Above all, I am furious at the politicians, who are doing nothing to oppose the AfD and other right-wing forces.”

Asked about the role played by the grand coalition parties and other established parties, which have essentially embraced and implemented the AfD’s policies, she remarked, “Yes, that’s right. That’s why demonstrations like today’s are so important. You can’t rely on the parties.”

Leo

Leo studies art in Mannheim and was visiting Berlin. He said he came to the demonstration to express his horror over the attack in Halle and show his solidarity with the victims. “I think it’s great that this demonstration was organised at such short notice and that so many are here and supporting it,” he said. “Today, the issue for me is to send a message in opposition to everything that has happened over recent years, beginning with the NSU murders. As tragic as last week’s attack was, we have to be clear about the fact that it wasn’t the only one.”

Caro, who lives and works in Berlin, also pointed out that Germany’s domestic intelligence agency has close ties to right-wing extremist terrorist structures and protects them. “There is no question that the Secret Service was closely tied to the NSU,” he said. “Some files were destroyed, others were locked away from the public for decades.”

He noted that the former head of the intelligence agency, Hans-Georg Maassen, has made clear in his statements that he sympathises with the far-right. “I find Maassen’s political views shocking. This man led the domestic intelligence service for years. In addition, there is the fact that the intelligence agency had large numbers of informants operating in the network around the NSU, just like with the NPD (National Democratic Party). What were they doing there?”

Caro pointed out that the German-Turkish journalist and publicist Denis Yücel has described the intelligence agency as “the most dangerous agency in Germany” and called it “unreformable.” He said, “I agree with that. In my opinion, a ‘state within the state’ is emerging here, just like in many other countries. The Office for the Protection of the Constitution (Verfassungsschutz) has for years contributed nothing to the protection of the constitution, but has rather undermined its fundamentals. This tendency strengthens the far-right. The media also plays a role.”

Aradiana and Guillermo

Guillermo and Aradiana from Argentina joined the protest after hearing about the attack in Halle. “We fully agree with this demonstration in terms of its condemnation of right-wing extremism, and we support the people who are here,” they said. They pointed out that the rise of the far-right is an international phenomenon. “Right-wing extremism is also a danger in Argentina,” said Guillermo. “We experienced how that led to the violation of democratic rights. Under the military dictatorship in particular. They killed political opponents. The present government under Macri thinks in a very similar way.”

By Marianne Arens in Germany:

Thousands protest in Germany against right-wing violence following fascist Yom Kippur attack

14 October 2019

Last Wednesday’s attack in Halle, in which a heavily armed fascist and anti-Semite sought to enter a synagogue in order to commit mass murder on the Yom Kippur holiday, has evoked horror and a wave of solidarity protests against right-wing violence. The attacker, 27-year-old Stephan Balliet, was unable to gain entry to the synagogue, where some 50 worshippers were gathered on the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. He proceeded to fatally shoot two people and wound several others in the immediate vicinity.

On Friday, thousands of people demonstrated against fascism and right-wing terrorism in cities across Germany. Masses of flowers were placed in front of synagogues accompanied by messages reading “Fight the beginnings” and “Together against the Right”. Passers-by stopped in groups in front of mosques, and in Halle, hundreds gathered to form a human chain around the synagogue.

The anti-racist initiative #unteilbar (#indivisible) called for a protest rally at August Bebel Square in Berlin-Mitte on Sunday. Last year the group organized a demonstration against xenophobia, the racist and anti-Semitic agitation of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD), and the grand coalition government’s right-wing policies, in which nearly a quarter-million people participated.

The appeal for the demonstration states, “Right-wing terror threatens our society!” It points out that the Halle assassin was not a lone offender. His terrorist attack was linked to “established militant Nazi structures, the NSU [National Socialist Underground] network and right-wing networks in the security agencies.” Added to this was the police’s “lack of willingness to investigate” and “a non-stop trivialization of the right-wing danger” in political circles and the media.

The massive expression of solidarity with the Jewish population and opposition to the far-right demonstrates the falsity of claims that the rise of the AfD and growth of right-wing terrorism reflect a rightward shift within the general public. The opposite is taking place. In the face of growing left-wing sentiment and opposition to military rearmament, restrictions on democratic rights and the strengthening of the police powers of the state, right-wing and neo-fascist cliques are being formed within the state apparatus. The cadres of the AfD come from the establishment parties and are supported and celebrated by “mainstream” politicians and media.

The Halle assassin, Stephan Balliet, was shaped by this milieu. On Friday, he filed a confession before an investigating judge in Karlsruhe in which he admits to racist and anti-Semitic motives in his deadly attack. According to the Federal Prosecutor’s Office, he is charged with two counts of murder and nine counts of attempted murder.

He should have been charged with over 50 counts of attempted murder. Balliet attempted to carry out a massacre in the Halle synagogue and kill as many Jews as possible. When he failed to do this, he shot a passer-by and shortly thereafter a construction worker at a kebab kiosk. He also seriously injured other passers-by.

The authorities have repeatedly claimed that Balliet was unknown to them and that he acted as a lone offender. However, Balliet was active on the internet, participating in worldwide, networked right-wing terrorist circles. During his interrogation, he reportedly testified that an “unknown person” with whom he had communicated on the internet had transferred money to him.

Balliet filmed the entire course of his cold-blooded murders and attempted murders, streaming everything on the gaming platform Twitch. Although his video has been deleted on Twitch, right-wing chat groups have been able to redistribute it. In the footage, Balliet addresses a global right-wing extremist audience to which he speaks in English.

He was clearly taking his lead from mass murderers such as Brenton Tarrant in New Zealand and Anders Breivik in Norway. In 2011, Breivik murdered several dozen young people and children belonging to the Norwegian Workers’ Youth. Tarrant shot and killed 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 15, 2019, injuring dozens more, and streamed the entire bloody assault live. Like these two, Balliet wrote a manifesto, which he posted on the internet. In it he states the following goals: “To kill Jews… to burn down a synagogue and a mosque, to kill a communist, to behead people …” He had also in mind targeting an Antifa centre.

Some of Balliet’s equipment (helmet, bullet-proof vest) apparently came from German Army (Bundeswehr) stockpiles and the police. It is quite possible that Balliet made his first contact with the far-right scene in the Bundeswehr. As is now known, in 2010 and 2011, shortly before the abolition of conscription, he underwent six months’ military service at the Panzergrenadierbataillon 401 in Mecklenburg-Pomerania, where he acquired training in weapons and shooting.

While hundreds of thousands have reacted with shock and spontaneous solidarity with the victims, politicians of all stripes have indulged in boundless hypocrisy. Their protestations of concern are meant to distract from their own responsibility for what has happened.

The central political responsibility of the German government for this act of murder is undeniable. For years, the grand coalition government of Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU) and Social Democrats (SPD) has been implementing the xenophobic policies of the AfD, from which it is now trying to dissociate itself. The government has systematically built up the capacity of the Bundeswehr for the next major war, providing the tens of billions of euros it requires by squeezing them out of the working class through ever more brutal austerity policies. In order to contain social opposition and divide the working class it has promoted nationalism and xenophobia, including the witch-hunting of Muslims.

On the eve of the Halle attack, the federal interior ministry, headed by Horst Seehofer (CSU), ordered the deportation of 44 men to war-torn Afghanistan. It was the 28th such charter flight to land in Kabul. Seehofer has also set up the notorious “anchor centres”, where refugees who have committed no crime are detained.

Decades of right-wing politics have led to the spread of a dangerous far-right network within the police, Bundeswehr and Secret Service. The AfD is the political figurehead of this “state within the state”, which, to an increasing extent, sets the political tone.

Right-wing war propaganda is being promoted at universities. Those who criticize such racism and war-mongering are persecuted and harassed by the government. The Verfassungsschutz (Secret Service) has placed the Sozialistische Gleichheitspartei (SGP—Socialist Equality Party) under surveillance and branded it a “left-wing extremist” organization on the explicit grounds that the SGP opposes capitalism, nationalism and the AfD and fights for a socialist programme against fascism and war.

The motives of the Halle assassin are reminiscent of the “Nordkreuz” group, which is infamous for its special cruelty. The group has hoarded weapons, ammunition and supplies and trained in shooting in order to kill political opponents, including refugee aid workers and “left-wing” politicians. Its ranks include policemen, intelligence agents and Bundeswehr soldiers. The penetration of right-wing extremist organizations deep within the state became clear with the recent fascist murder of Kassel’s regional president, Walter Lübcke. His murderer had been known to the Hesse state intelligence service for years.

All this is so obvious that journalists who interviewed Seehhofer on television Friday evening asked him why his government had retained Hans-Georg Maassen for five years as head of the Verfassungsschutz despite his close links to the AfD. They asked if that meant the German state was “blind in the right eye”.

Seehofer once again defended Maassen. “I’ve never seen him as radical right-winger”, said the interior minister, downplaying the right-wing network within the state: “The number of cases is marginal. We are acting consistently there.”

In the same program, Seehofer acknowledged that some 12,000 violent right-wing extremists circulated freely in Germany, and that they were characterized by “a high degree of affinity for weapons and a high degree of readiness to use violence.”

His conclusion was that he needed “a few hundred extra people” in the Federal Criminal Office (BKA) and the Verfassungsschutz, and he argued for more stringent government control over social media such as Facebook. He justified the censorship of social media, saying, “We have to learn in Germany that the new media spreads hatred.”

The German government is reacting to the Halle attack in familiar fashion—building up the apparatus of an authoritarian police state and shielding far-right extremists.

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Neo-nazi network behind German synagogue attack


This 10 October 2019 video says about itself:

Residents of the east German city of Halle lit candles and laid flowers at the market square as they held a vigil on Thursday to commemorate the victims of a shooting that took place near a synagogue and kebab shop the day before.

By Ulrich Rippert in Germany:

Right-wing extremist network behind fascist synagogue attack in Germany

12 October 2019

The day after the right-wing terrorist attack on a synagogue in Halle, Germany this week was dominated by hypocritical statements of shock and sympathy from government circles.

Chancellor Angela Merkel (Christian Democrats, CDU) told the IG Metall trade union congress in Nürnberg that she was “shocked” and “affected” by the attack. Merkel added that she is mourning with the families and friends of those murdered. In confronting hate and anti-Semitism, the state must make full use of all its resourcesm the Chancellor stated. “There is no tolerance for it.”

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier (Social Democrats, SPD), declared it a “day of shame and disgrace” as he laid a wreath at the site of the attack that killed two people. Anyone displaying even a slight degree of acceptance of right-wing extremism bears a share of the guilt with the perpetrator, he said.

Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, of all people,

because of his anti-refugee policies

even repeated the words of a party colleague, describing some Alternative for Germany (AfD) officials as “ideological inciters” of the terrorist attack.

Similar statements were mouthed in June after Kassel District President Walter Lübcke (CDU) was murdered in cold blood by a fascist gunman. At the time, decisive action against the far-right was also announced, but what followed was the exact opposite. While the wide-ranging network of right-wing extremist terrorists in the police, army and intelligence agencies was left untouched, it was those who oppose them who were targeted for persecution.

The reality is that the “ideological inciters” of the right-wing terrorist attack hold top positions within the state and security apparatus, the intelligence agencies, the military and the federal government. They have not only embraced the AfD’s slogan of “foreigners out!” on refugee policy; Seehofer himself dismissed the rampage of fascist thugs targeting foreigners and Jewish institutions in Chemnitz in the summer of 2018, declaring that if he were not a government minister, he would have joined the right-wing demonstrations.

According to initial investigations, the fascist gunman in the Halle attack had close ties to a right-wing extremist network with intimate connections to the state apparatus. The initial claim that the attack was the work of a single gunman has been contradicted by a growing number of facts.

It is now clear that Stephane Balliet, a 27-year-old German citizen from Saxony-Anhalt, opened fire on the synagogue Wednesday, where over 50 people had gathered to celebrate Yom Kippur, intending to carry out a bloodbath.

He repeatedly sought to use explosives to secure entry to the building, and apparently planned to murder as many participants as possible. After failing to break through the door, he shot a passer-by and another man in a nearby kebab shop. Shortly afterwards, he injured two further people as he fled from the police. He was then arrested and handed over to the federal prosecutor’s office on Thursday.

Balliet wore military fatigues and was in possession of several high-powered firearms. Four kilograms of explosives were found in his car. He communicated with his supporters through a camera on his helmet. He livestreamed footage of the attack on the synagogue and kebab shop, and his killing of the passer-by, on the video platform Twitch.

A die-hard anti-Semite and neo-Nazi, Balliet began his video with a denial of the Holocaust, and continued, “The origin of all problems is the Jews.” Balliet referred to himself as part of an online SS group, declaring, “Nobody expects the internet SS.”

During the attack, Balliet played the music of right-wing extremist Alec Minassian, who carried out an attack in Toronto, Canada in April 2018 by driving his vehicle into pedestrians. He killed 10 people and injured an additional 16. Prior to the attack, Minassian served for two months in the Canadian Armed Forces, and completed his recruitment training a few months prior to the attack. His ideological mentor, in turn, was the mass murderer Elliot Rodger, who shot and killed six people in California in 2014 and injured 14 more.

Balliet published a number of documents online prior to his attack. He described an 11-page document as his “manifesto.” In it, he describes his weapons, including how he constructed them from building materials, and where he obtained the explosives. He also formulated goals, which he described as “achievements”. Among his potential achievements were using multiple weapons to kill several Jews, burning down a synagogue and a mosque, killing a communist, and beheading people with a sword or killing them with a nail bomb.

Although the gunman was visibly expounding his fascist views on right-wing extremist forums, and these forums are populated by covert state intelligence agents, investigators have claimed that Balliet was not known to the authorities.

The same arguments were employed following the terrorist attack on the Christmas market at Breitscheidplatz in Berlin. In December 2017, an attacker drove a lorry into the market, killing 12 people and injuring another 55. At the time, the authorities declared that Anis Amri had not been considered an “acute threat”. It later emerged that several intelligence agency offices were aware of his plans for an attack, and that Amri was even driven to Berlin by an informant.

A similar picture emerged with regard to the murder of Lübcke earlier this year. Initially, it was claimed that the right-wing terrorist Stephan Ernst acted independently and alone. It later became clear that he is part of a wide-ranging right-wing extremist terrorist network that also includes a number of intelligence agents.

Further troubling questions have also been raised by the synagogue attack in Halle, including why there was no on-site police protection at the time of the attack and why the police were so slow to act in response to the shooter. The chairman of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, Josef Schuster, declared this to be “grave negligence”. The head of the Jewish community in Halle, Max Privorozki, accused the police of responding too slowly. “They arrived too late”. he said in a video. The police took at least 10 minutes to arrive after they were called and informed that an armed attack on the synagogue was in progress.

The claim by the police that there was no need for special protection for the Yom Kippur celebration because there were no warnings of possible disturbances is not credible. Just a day prior to the attack, police raids were launched against right-wing extremists in Bavaria, Saxony, Baden-Württemberg, and even Saxony-Anhalt. They were targeted against the authors of 23 threatening letters warning of attacks on refugee centres, mosques, left-wing party offices, and media outlets.

The question must be posed, were the preparations for an attack on the synagogue in Halle known to the security agencies? Was the attack considered a price worth paying? The influence of far-right groups among police officers and intelligence agents is well known.

This has been on display on several occasions in Saxony-Anhalt, and in Halle in particular. There is much to suggest that the synagogue attack did not coincidentally take place in the city, and that it was aimed at encouraging the development of a fascist movement.

Halle was the location earlier this year of a trial against several members of the neo-Nazi group “Aryans”. This fascist gang of thugs launched an attack on the sidelines of the May Day demonstration in the city in 2017 with their cars, throwing stones at participants and attacking them violently. The attack also caused severe injuries among a group of hikers who were not part of the demonstration.

The Süddeutsche Zeitung reported at the time, “This trial shows how often and how extensively the judiciary trivialises and ignores right-wing violence, especially in the states in eastern Germany. The state prosecutor responsible for the case in Halle considers it to be ‘ordinary daily business’. She explained this in a statement: ‘The level of aggressiveness by the defendant does not go beyond what is unfortunately now common behaviour in connection with political events.’”

During the trial, investigators discovered a chat on the phone of one of the defendants in which she twice asked a police officer to obtain data from an internal police database. According to the Süddeutsche Zeitung, the police officer then sent information to the convicted right-wing extremist.

“Right-wing extremism in Halle has its own home,” reported Deutsche Welle, referring to a communal living project run by the Identitarian movement in the heart of the city. This is where right-wing ideologues, members of student leagues and neo-Nazis meet with young hipsters, wrote the magazine, adding, “Their goal: racism and Islamophobia should be brought into the heart of society.”

Nazi ex-soldier murderer Stephan Balliet confesses racism


This 10 October 2019 video says about itself:

Germany: Football fans hold vigil for Halle shooting victim at kebab shop

Fans of the Hallescher football club (HFC) held a vigil on Thursday, outside the kebab shop where a [Turkish German] fellow football fan was killed in the Wednesday shooting in the German city of Halle.

The fans are seen standing outside the kebab shop, holding HFC scarves as flowers and candles lay on the sidewalk.

A 27-year-old male named Stephan B. has been arrested, according to a spokesman for the German Federal Prosecutor, after two were killed near the synagogue on Yom Kippur in what the Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht called an anti-Semitic far-right terror attack.

According to the Times of Israel, 10 October 2019, about Stephan Balliet, the German nazi murderer who killed two people in Halle:

He also served in the Bundeswehr (German army), and several people who saw him during the attack said he looked “professional” or trained in weapons use.

That Stephan Balliet used to be a professional soldier in the professional Bundeswehr is also relevant, as inside the Bundeswehr there are neo-nazi networks, including senior officers. Did Balliet get his nazi ideas there?

According to German weekly Der Spiegel, Balliet had his camera with which he live streamed his crimes, on his Bundeswehr helmet. He also wore a Bundeswehr uniform.

So, apparently he still had an official helmet and an official uniform. Was he a reserve soldier after his full-time service?

Translated from tagessschau.de in Germany today:

The 27-year-old Stephan B. has confessed, according to ARD TV information, his terror attack in Halle and has also confirmed a right-wing extremist, anti-Semitic motive. He did not give any information on possible accomplices. …

Were there any accomplices?

According to the investigators, the alleged assassin wanted to cause a massacre and instigate imitators to similar right-wing extremist and anti-Semitic acts. The investigation now focuses on “whether persons were involved in the preparation or execution of the attack or had prior knowledge thereof”, as the Federal Prosecutor’s Office declared on Thursday evening. …

Stephan B. was arrested on Wednesday. He is accused of killing a 40-year-old woman from Halle in front of the synagogue and a 20-year-old [Turkish German] man from Merseburg in a nearby döner kebab shop. Previously, the alleged perpetrator had tried in vain to storm the synagogue with gun violence. At the time, 51 people were inside the synagogue, celebrating the most important Jewish festival, Yom Kippur.

On the run, the offender also injured a 40-year-old woman and her 41-year-old husband with gunfire. The couple is treated in the hospital. …

In the attack, the perpetrator, according to data of Attorney General Peter Frank, had four firearms with him. They included at least one fully automatic firearm, besides, he had several explosives in his car on the way to the synagogue.

Nazi murderer Stephan Balliet, anti-Semite, Islamophobe, anti-left


This 9 October 2019 video is called Yom Kippur suspect shooter [Stephan Balliet], who killed two people in attack on German synagogue, live stream video.

Translated from Dutch NOS radio today:

The man who yesterday committed an attack on a synagogue in the German town of Halle, killing two people, was spreading a manifesto on right-wing extremist internet forums about his act. “He denies the Holocaust and calls the Jews the source of all evil,” says correspondent Judith van de Hulsbeek in the NOS Radio 1 News.

The manifesto describes in detail the weapons and equipment he has purchased for his action. The main objective was to kill Jews, but according to the Tagesschau, he also planned an attack on a mosque and a center of left-wing activists. The man deliberately chose the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur, because then also most non-religious Jews would be in the synagogue.

He is not only a dedicated anti-Semite, says Van de Hulsbeek. “He also swears about Turks, feminists, basically anyone who he thinks is anti-white man. Those people are his target.”

Yesterday it soon became apparent that the 27-year-old attacker had wanted to invade the synagogue in Halle, where about eighty Jews were present for the celebration of Yom Kippur. Failing to do so, he opened fire in front of the building, killing two people, a female passer-by and a visitor to a döner business. …

He filmed the attack and broadcast it live on the Twitch video platform. …

The attack in Christchurch in New Zealand where a right-wing extremist killed 51 people earlier this year seems to have been a source of inspiration for the attacker in Halle. “It is the same method and shows many similarities,” says Van de Hulsbeek. That attack was also streamed live.

See also here.

From Haaretz in Israel:

Analysis Germany Synagogue Attack: Liberal Values Make Jews Everywhere Prime Target for White Supremacists

The synagogue shooting in eastern Germany wasn’t just an anti-Semitic attack. It was also an attack against immigration and values that have been identified with Jews

White Nationalists on Telegram Are Hailing the Germany Synagogue Shooter as a ‘Saint’. The gleeful reaction of white nationalists on Telegram provides yet another example of the international nature of the modern far right: here.

USA: A white, spray-painted swastika appearing above the word “Trump” was found on the Yale Law School campus over the weekend an an act referred to as “utterly antithetical” to the school’s values: here.

German Halle synagogue attack nazi murders two


This 9 October 2019 video says about itself:

Halle: Eyewitness describes shooting in Germany

Two people died and two more were severely injured in the eastern German city of Halle on Wednesday after a gunman opened fire in the city’s Paulus quarter. Speaking to German broadcaster RTL, an eyewitness said he had been in a kebab shop when a man with a helmet and military jacket approached, caused a small, loud explosion and then started shooting, sending people to flee to the back of the shop.

By Johannes Stern in Germany:

German Nazi murders two in Yom Kippur Synagogue attack

10 October 2019

The attack by a Nazi killer on the synagogue in Halle has left two people dead and several injured. Carried out on the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the murderous rampage was intended to demonstrate that anti-Semitism remains a significant political force in Germany. The attack demonstrates, in a horrific manner, the dark political reality in Germany: Almost 75 years after the fall of the Third Reich, the country has, once again, a serious Nazi and anti-Semitic problem, which has led to death and serious injury.

It is clear that the assassinations in Halle were right-wing extremist terror attacks. The suspect is 27-year-old Stephan Balliet from Saxony-Anhalt, who has since been arrested. His rampage recalls that of the right-wing Australian-born terrorist Brentan Tarrant, who attacked two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand last March, killing 51 people. Like Tarrant, Balliet was heavily armed and wore a helmet and army clothing. He filmed his bloody rampage and transmitted it via livestream to the Internet.

The more than 30-minute video shows Balliet shooting a passer-by near Halle’s Jewish cemetery, and a guest in a kebab shop near the synagogue. Previously, the right-wing terrorist had tried to enter the Jewish religious building in order to kill the 70 to 80 worshippers there. On the run, Balliet injured two other people in Landsberg, Saxony.

Max Privorozki, chairman of the Jewish community in Halle, told the news magazine Spiegel Online how his community barely escaped a massacre: “The perpetrator shot several times at the door and threw several Molotov cocktails, firecrackers or grenades to penetrate it. But the door stayed shut; God protected us. The whole thing lasted maybe five to ten minutes.”

The video shows that the assassin acted out of hatred for foreigners and Jews. According to media reports, he repeatedly scolded “Kanaken”,

term of abuse for, eg, people of Turkish ancestry

denied the Holocaust and made extremely anti-Semitic statements in his poor English.

Despite the holiday, the synagogue was not protected by police. Balliet was able to shoot for minutes, murder two people and drive away undisturbed, before alarmed police arrived.

Josef Schuster, chairman of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, noted, “It’s a shocking experience, but it’s a development we’ve warned against in recent years.” Parts of society have drifted to the extreme right; words have been followed by deeds. He saw what has happened “not as an isolated case, but as a clear development.”

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

In May, Seehofer’s [German] department [of the Interior] published figures on so-called politically motivated crime. The report (.pdf) showed that nearly 1,800 anti-Semitic offences were counted in Germany last year: nearly 20 percent more than a year earlier.

This included violence, but also the use of anti-Semitic symbols such as the swastika. In nearly 90 percent of the registered cases, the offender had an extreme right-wing background. The number of xenophobic incidents

like the killing of the person of Turkish ancestry in the Halle attack yesterday

also increased by 20 percent from 2017 to 2018, to 7,700. …

Earlier this year a study was also published about the experiences of Jews from all over Europe with anti-Semitism. …

Of all respondents, young Jews from Germany said they had suffered the most (41 percent) from anti-Semitism.

The Johannes Stern article continues:

Responsibility for this bloody deed lies with the ruling class. The hypocritical expressions of condolence by Chancellor Angela Merkel (CDU) and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier (SPD) last evening cannot conceal this fact. In recent years, the entire ruling class, along with the media, have systematically created the ideological climate and political conditions for right-wing terror.

In tandem with the AfD it has built up a right-wing extremist party, whose chairman Alexander Gauland glorifies the Wehrmacht [of Adolf Hitler] and describes Hitler and the Nazis as “bird shit in over 1000 years of successful German history.” The grand coalition has made the AfD the official leader of the parliamentary opposition since the 2017 federal elections, integrated it into the parliamentary framework and adopted its refugee policy one-to-one.

At the same time, it allows the radical right-wing terrorist networks, which reach deep into the army, police and secret services, maintaining death lists, with the names of several thousand targeted persons, to operate almost unharmed. As in the case of the series of murders committed by the neo-Nazi National Socialist Underground (NSU), the recent case of Kassel District President Walter Lübcke (CDU), who was murdered in May, revealed how close the links are between the state—and, in particular the Office for the Protection of the Constitution—and the right-wing terrorists.

According to the official statistics of the Federal Criminal Police Office, a total of 497 right-wing extremists remain at large, although arrest warrants have been issued against them.

As in the Weimar Republic, the ruling class primarily uses the rearmament of the state apparatus, which is shot through with right-wing extremist elements, to intensify action against the left.

In the current report of the Verfassungsschutz (Office for the Protection of the Constitution), the Interior Ministry’s secret service, the Sozialistische Gleichheitspartei (Socialist Equality Party—SGP) has, for the second time in a row, been listed as an “object of observation”, because it fights against right-wing extremism and advocates a socialist program that, according to the accusation of the secret service, is directed “against alleged nationalism, imperialism and militarism.” Mass protests against the AfD, such as the “Rock gegen Rechts” concert in Chemnitz last September, have also been defamed as “left-wing extremist” by the Office for the Protection of the Constitution.

The right-wing offensive is supported by influential university academics who, as in the Third Reich under the Nazis, play a key role in the ideological preparation for dictatorship and war.

At the end of August, Bernhard Kempen, chairman of the German Association of University Professors and Lecturers (Deutscher Hochschulverband), gave a television interview backing the right-wing radical historian Jörg Baberowski. Kempen denounced any criticism of Baberowski’s anti-refugee viewpoint and apologetics for the Nazis (“Hitler was not vicious”) as “terrorism of opinion and conviction” [“Meinungs- und Gessinungsterrorismus”]. Most recently, Baberowski failed to establish a centre for dictatorship research at the Humboldt University in Berlin, due to the immense opposition of the student body.

Five years ago, the SGP warned of the consequences of the return of German militarism at a Special Conference Against War in Berlin. Only a few months after Steinmeier, then Foreign Minister, had declared at the Munich Security Conference in 2014, that Germany was “too big to merely comment on world politics from the sidelines,” we analysed the objective driving forces behind the return of German militarism, and explained:

The propaganda of the post-war era—that Germany had learnt from the terrible crimes of the Nazis, had ‘arrived at the West’, had embraced a peaceful foreign policy, and had developed into a stable democracy—is exposed as lies. German imperialism is once again showing its real colours as it emerged historically, with all of its aggressiveness at home and abroad.

Five years later, this assessment is being dramatically confirmed. The far-right terror in Halle aims to establish anti-Semitism and Nazism, once again, as an influential political force in Germany. It is being used by the ruling class, as in the 1930s, to arm the oppressive state apparatus, advance militarism and suppress growing social and political resistance.

The only social force that can stop the fascist danger and a relapse into barbarism is the international working class.

German nazi murders at synagogue, kebab shop


This 9 October 2019 German video, by right-wing daily Bild, says about itself (translated):

Right-wing terror in Halle +++ Neo-Nazi Stephan Balliet streamed his attack live

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

The perpetrator of the attack in Halle, Germany, has recorded the murder of two people on video. The images were uploaded on video site Twitch. The clip lasts nearly 36 minutes and is similar to the footage Brenton Tarrant made of the Christchurch massacre in New Zealand in March of this year.

The shooter in Halle seems to act alone. Because his weapon repeatedly jams, kiling of more victims was prevented.

German media report that the perpetrator is 27-year-old Stephan B. … He films himself at the start of the video and calls himself ‘anon’. That’s a term for anonymous users on forums like 8chan. He calls Jews “the cause of all problems” and denies the Holocaust. He also complains about feminism and mass immigration.

Bucket full of explosives

You can see how he drives to a synagogue. He can not come in, after which he fires a few shots at the door. He then applies a home-made explosive device to a side door. A bucket full of explosives can be seen in his car. The man tries to find another entrance but does not succeed. He walks around the synagogue in a swearing and ranting tone.

A woman passer-by who talks to him is cold-bloodedly murdered. The man drives away and stops again at a street corner where he walks into a [Turkish owned] döner-kebab shop. Two men can escape because the shooter’s gun repeatedly jams.

Back on the street, he shoots at a passer-by again, but he doesn’t seem to hit. He then goes after two workmen and shoots at them, but they also escape.

“Weapons worthless”

The shooter then returns to the kebab shop and shoots a man dead who is hiding in a corner. When he leaves the shop again, the gunman complains about his weapons: “I have proven that improvised weapons are worthless.”

He is then blocked by police, whom he shoots at repeatedly. He is injured in the neck himself. “I don’t know if I’m going to die,” he says. When the man manages to escape, he listens to music and apparently by chance to a radio program about the arms trade.

After barely half an hour he apparently throws the camera or telephone out of the car window. The images continue to run for a few minutes while cars drive over the camera.

Lethal German nazi attack on synagogue, Turks


This 9 October 2019 German video says about itself, translated:

Killers came with bulletproof vests and guns: attack on synagogue in Halle

Attack on the synagogue in the Paulus district in Halle! At least two people were killed!

With several weapons, shots were fired on Wednesday afternoon. Several armed culprits were on the run, a police spokeswoman said. There was now one person arrested.

Also, at least two people were injured.

Dutch NOS TV reports that the violent neo-nazis also threw hand grenades. They not only fired shots at the synagogue, but also at a döner kebab business. These businesses are mostly owned by people of Turkish ancestry.

Nevertheless, Dutch right-wing site GeenStijl initially claimed the murderers were Muslims; while it looks a lot more like Islamophobes.

In German media, it is suspected they are so-called mittelfränkische Neonazis, originally from the NPD party in Bavaria.

Halle Police said the two victims of the attack are a woman, who was killed at the synagogue, and a man, who was killed at the kebab shop. … The car used by the suspect seen in video obtained by CNN shooting behind a grey car is registered to the town of Euskirchen, North Rhine–Westfalia, which is 263 miles from Halle. … António Guterres, the UN Secretary-General, strongly condemned the Halle, Germany, attack, according to a statement given through his deputy spokesman. He regards this as “yet another tragic demonstration of anti-Semitism — perpetrated on the holy day of Yom Kippur — which needs to be fought with the utmost determination”: here.