Egyptian singer arrested for eating banana


This 16 November 2017 music video is by Shyma from Egypt.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Egyptian singer arrested for ‘inciting debauchery’ after eating a banana in music video

‘I didn’t imagine all this would happen and that I would be subjected to such a strong attack’

Rachael Revesz

A pop star has been arrested in Egypt on suspicion of inciting debauchery in a music video.

[21-year-old] Shyma, who was shown dancing in her underwear and eating fruit in front of a classroom of men and a blackboard with “Class #69” written on it, was detained after the video caused numerous complaints. …

For Shyma’s supporters, the pop star’s arrest was a symbol of women’s oppression in a country that was voted the worst in the Arab world for women in 2013.

I’d say that Saudi Arabia is still a lot worse.

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Vegan alternative for cruel anti-geese foie gras


This 2012 video is called French Foie Gras CrueltyAnimal Equality Undercover Investigation. It says about itself:

WARNING: The video you’re about to see contains graphic footage. Viewer discretion is advised.

Animal Equality documents the shocking reality of life for ducks and geese confined and force-fed for foie gras production in France.

INVESTIGATION’S FINDINGS:

• Animals confined to small cages in which the animals could not even turn around

• Animals with clear signs of stress and depression

• Evidence of trauma and inflammation of the esophagus – recognised by blood stains on force feeding tubes

• Animals with obvious respiratory problems

• Weak ducks left to die without veterinary care

• Ducks, who appeared fully aware of their situation at the time of slaughter. These animals were flapping, kicking, and bleeding incessantly

• Workers handling animals roughly

• Ducks moving with difficulty due to the size of their livers

France is the largest producer and exporter of foie gras. Over 20,000 tons are produced and approximately 700,000 geese and 37 million ducks are slaughtered by the French foie gras industry each year. Over 4,200 tons are consumed in Spain, and 850 tons are produced. Over 1,150,000 ducks are slaughtered by the Spanish foie gras industry each year.

Today, Dutch NOS TV reports that a vegan alternative to cruel anti-birds foie gras has been developed. Tasting similarly, but without any bird being harmed.

The new vegan foie gras, NOS photo

Belgian restaurant owner Paul Florizoone makes it, based on tofu and cereals.

It is already sold in Belgium. Today, it is introduced in the Netherlands.

No fruit bats, no durian fruit


This video says about itself:

14 May 2015

A Cave Nectar Bat is pollinating durian flowers in Thailand. The durian is the king of South East Asian fruits, selling for billions of dollars annually. However, every flower must be pollinated by a bat in order to set fruit, even when grown in orchards.

From the University of Nottingham in England:

Durian industry could suffer without the endangered fruit bat

October 3, 2017

Scientists have discovered that Southeast Asia’s endangered fruit bats — commonly known as flying foxes — play an important part in the pollination of the iconic and economically important durian tree.

Using camera traps, researchers collected video evidence showing the island flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) pollinating durian flowers, leading to the production of healthy durian fruit. Their study — Pollination by the locally endangered island flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) enhances fruit production of the economically important durian (Durio zibethinus) — has been published in the Journal of Ecology and Evolution.

The video footage was captured on Tioman Island by a team led by Dr Sheema Abdul Aziz as part of her PhD at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle (France) in collaboration with the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus. Dr Sheema said: “These are very important findings because they shed more light on the crucial ecosystem services provided by flying foxes. Previously it was known that the smaller, nectar-feeding bats are pollinators for durian — but many people believed that flying foxes were too large and destructive to play such a role. Our study shows the exact opposite: that these giant fruit bats are actually very effective in pollinating durian trees.”

The spikey tropical durian fruit, with its spikey skin and distinctive odour, is highly prized throughout Malaysia and Thailand. A ubiquitous icon of Southeast Asian culture, it is also a lucrative industry, generating millions of US dollars in local and international trade. The new findings suggest these economic profits owe a huge debt to large fruit bats such as flying foxes — as they were previously believed to be destructive rather than beneficial.

Dr Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, from the School of Environment and Geographical Sciences of the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and one of the coauthors of the study, said: “The durian is a fascinating plant that, with its flowers pollinated by bats and its seeds dispersed by large animals like elephants, beautifully exemplifies the importance of plant animal interactions. The durian fruit is particularly famous for its pungent smell and unique taste, adored by most people in Southeast Asia and so often misunderstood — abhorred? — by westerners. We hope this study brings attention to the urgency of conserving flying foxes in Southeast Asia.”

Flying fox populations in severe decline

The island flying fox is already classified as ‘endangered’ on Malaysia’s National Red List.

Large fruit bats of the genus Pteropus are severely threatened by hunting and deforestation. They are often sold and eaten as exotic meat due to an unsubstantiated belief that consuming them can help cure asthma and other respiratory problems. They are also persecuted and killed as agricultural pests, as some people claim that the bats cause damage and economic loss by feeding on cultivated fruits.

Consequently, these factors have led to a severe decline in flying fox populations worldwide.

Repercussions for tropical ecosystems

This study shows that these bats play important roles as seed dispersers and pollinators in rainforests, especially on islands. Their disappearance could therefore have repercussions for tropical ecosystems.

This international team of researchers from Malaysia, France, India, and Thailand, in collaboration with Tree Climbers Malaysia, has found that Southeast Asia’s durian supply could be affected too.

Dr Sheema said: “If people end up hunting flying foxes to extinction, it’s not hard to see that there could be serious implications for Southeast Asia’s beloved ‘King of Fruits‘”.

Goat shit, rabbit shit, food on Vlieland island?


Vlieland goat shit, 29 September 2017

This 29 September 2017 cell phone photo is from the ship from Harlingen harbour to Vlieland island in the Netherlands.

On Vlieland there are not only beautiful birds, but goats and rabbits as well.

The captions on the boxes say Vlieland goat excrement and Vlieland rabbit excrement.

Do people really eat shit on Vlieland?

No: the content of the boxes is licorice.