Ugandan medical anthropologist arrested for criticizing goverrnment


This 14 March 2017 video from Uganda is called [medical anthropologist] Stella Nyanzi Talks About Her Pads Campaign Live on Morning Breeze.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Academic held for Museveni insults

UGANDA: Academic Stella Nyanzi has been arrested for insulting the president and his wife on Facebook, police said yesterday.

Spokesman Asan Kasingye said Ms Nyanzi would be charged with cyber harassment and offensive communications for her posts attacking President Yoweri Museveni, whom she accused of “31 years of increasingly despotic family rule.”

She attacked his wife, the education minister, for claiming that the state could not afford to provide tampons for schoolgirls.

The Ugandan government had reneged on a campaign pledge to supply free sanitary pads to schoolgirls struggling to afford hygiene products: here.

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British government jails raped African women


One Day Withous Us in Britain

By Elizabeth Tswana and Anna Cross in England:

Victims of rape treated with suspicion and scorn

Friday 17th February 2017

A Ugandan refugee and gang rape victim, Erioth Mwesigwa escaped to Britain. But the government locked her up in Yarl’s Wood. Elizabeth Tswana and Anna Cross tell her harrowing story

WE ARE the All African Women’s Group, a self-help group of women seeking asylum, based at the Crossroads Women’s Centre in London.

Once a fortnight, 90 to 100 women from different countries come together to discuss our legal cases, share experiences and support each other.

One of our members, Erioth Mwesigwa, a 59-year-old woman who suffered multiple gang rape by soldiers in Uganda, has been detained at Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre.

Erioth has helped other women with their legal cases, spoken at public events and regularly attends our fortnightly meetings. Last Friday, guards came to her room in detention to take her to the airport but Erioth bravely refused to go.

Now the High Court has refused her claim and told her she has to go back to Uganda to appeal.

We cannot allow this. Erioth won’t survive and we refuse to allow anyone to be sent back to their death.

Erioth was targeted by soldiers because her husband was suspected of opposing former Ugandan president Milton Obote.

A family member who hid her in his house after she escaped from prison was subsequently killed.

She spent years in hiding in Uganda before she finally managed to escape to Britain and meet with her (now ex-) husband and family, who had already been granted refugee status. However, when Erioth asked for the same, she was refused.

Many of us in the All African Women’s Group are victims of rape and other torture.

We too have been in detention and threatened with removal.

A few of our members have been sent back to their country of origin and have suffered further rape and abuse.

It is the actions of governments like the British that fuel wars in Africa that make us flee in the first place.

We are forced to be refugees. Yet when we come here to get safety we are treated like beggars and scroungers.

The Home Office has accepted that Erioth is a victim of rape but they still want to deport her because the rape happened a long time ago.

We hear on the news every day how victims of abuse in this country have come out after so many years and are still scarred and traumatised.

Who would dare say to them that they should just get over it?

Erioth is clearly still very badly affected by what happened to her and has never had the support she needed to recover until she met us.

We have been in touch with Erioth every day since she was detained.

She said to us: “When I was in Uganda I had to spend all those years in hiding and fear that one day I will be found by the soldiers again.

“After all that, I have finally found a place where I feel safe with people who care about me. It has given me hope for my life. I do not have anyone who I can return to in Uganda. Here I have my family and friends who look after me.”

Women Against Rape, which is also supporting Erioth, has shown that 88 per cent of victims of rape and sexual violence are disbelieved when they claim asylum.

Even though it is well known that in some countries rape is widespread and used as a way of waging war on the community, when we arrive in Britain and say we have been raped, we are treated with suspicion and forced to prove in every little detail what we have been through.

We believe that Erioth should be able to stay in here and remain a part of our group.

Please join our protest and write to the Home Secretary to demand that Erioth is released from detention and given the right to stay.

Elizabeth Tswana and Anna Cross are member of the campaigning All African Women’s Group. You can join the protest against Erioth’s detention and removal as part of the One Day Without Us event on Monday February 20 outside the Home Office, 2 Marsham Street, Westminster, SW1P 4DF, from 4.30pm to 5.30pm. For more information on the One Day Without Us visit 1daywithoutus.org.

Ugandan police stops Gay Pride march


Ugandan Gay Pride marchers in 2015, AFP photo

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Ugandan police stops Gay Pride

Today, 16:16

The Ugandan police has stopped a Gay Pride planned for today. According to a government spokesman, the Gay Pride is illegal.

At two places in Uganda celebrations were planned. A hundred gay, lesbian and transgender people came to a beach at Lake Victoria. They were all arrested, but were released later. According to a gay rights activist the arrests “traumatized” the people.

Homosexuality is illegal in Uganda. In 2013, the Ugandan parliament passed a law which introduced life imprisonment for homosexuality. The Supreme Court declared the law null and void.

Gay rights activists arrested in Uganda


This video says about itself:

9 August 2015

Ugandan activists have taken part in a gay pride rally, a year since a law requiring homosexuals to be jailed for life was overturned.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Uganda: Gay rights leader held by police in Pride attack

Saturday 6th August 2016

UGANDAN police broke up a gay pride event in the capital Kampala and arrested about 20 people yesterday, including gay rights leader Frank Mugisha.

He said a fashion show had been under way at a nightclub when police arrived and asked who the organisers were, handcuffing Mr Mugisha when he identified himself to a police commander.

About 20 others were arrested, driven to a police station for questioning and released later, with some alleging that they had been slapped or pushed around by officers.

One man trying to escape arrest at the nightclub injured himself while jumping to safety, said Mr Mugisha, adding: “We condemn the police actions, the use of excessive force during arrest.”

Police spokesman Patrick Onyango confirmed the arrests but gave no details.

Homosexuality is illegal in Uganda under a British colonial-era law that prohibits sex acts “against the order of nature.”

Bird conservation in Uganda


This video says about itself:

19 November 2014

Potential effects of land reclamation and pollution on the total value of Lutembe Bay wetland – Uganda

From BirdLife:

Conservation Strides: Lutembe bay forms Ramsar Site Committee

By Vincent Barugahare, Iyango Lucy and Chris Magero, 13 June 2016

Lutembe bay is located in Sissa and Katabi sub-counties, Wakiso district, Uganda and is among the critical wetland systems in the Lake Victoria basin. It was designated as a Ramsar site in 2006 based on its importance as a habitat for migratory birds and seven globally threatened bird species including Papyrus Yellow Warbler Chloropeta gracilirostris, Papyrus Gonolek Laniarius mufumbiri, Shoebill Balaeniceps rex, African Skimmer Rhynchops flavirostris, Pallid Harrier Circus macrouros, Great Snipe Gallinago media and Madagascar Squacco Heron Ardeola idea. It is also a rich breeding ground for fish and source of water for the surrounding communities.

Among the key requirements of the Ramsar Convention is that every designated site must have a committee to monitor and guide the interventions undertaken within the site.  However in the last 10 years following its designation, Lutembe has been lacking an active site committee which has to some extent exposed it to continued degradation.

The Ramsar office for Eastern Africa (RAMCEA) through MacArthur funding has taken a step towards promoting the sustainable management of the wetland by constituting and training a Ramsar site committee for Lutembe wetlands, Uganda. The members of the committee include community representatives from Bweya, Namulanda, Kisubi and Mutungo villages and stakeholders from the private sector, fishermen and the beach management units. For the first time, the committee consists of a private sector representative, Rosebud Flowers, who are also utilizing a significant portion of the site for flower production. The next step involve defining the roles and responsibility of each of the stakeholders and setting clear actions that will ensure sustainability of the wetland.

There is now renewed energy amongst the stakeholders to ensure the wise use of Lutembe, through sustainable management which will maximize the benefits from the ecosystem to its people.

Traditional wisdom and conservation science in Lake Victoria: here.