Trump’s air force attacks Iraq, Syria, Somalia


This 11 April 2017 video from the USA says about itself:

Does President Trump stand to personally profit off the wars he is escalating in Iraq, Yemen, Syria, Somalia and beyond? That’s the question many are asking, after it emerged that Trump has personally invested in Raytheon, the military contractor who makes the Tomahawk missiles used in the U.S. strike on a Syrian airbase last week. Raytheon’s stocks briefly surged after the attack. Overall, the stocks of defense contractors, such as Boeing and General Dynamics, have increased since Trump’s election, further fueled by his promise of a “historic” 10 percent increase in U.S. military spending. For more, we speak with William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy. His latest book is “Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex.”

Eg, Dutch daily Trouw reports today that on 29 December 2019, United States F-15 warplanes attacked Iraq, Syria and Somalia.

The attacks in Iraq and Syria were against Kata’ib Hezbollah, an Iraqi Shiite militia which had fought against ISIS; and was accused by the United States Trump administration of recently killing a United States mercenary contractor at a United States military base in Iraq. The 29 December attacks on Syria and Iraq killed at least 25 people and injured 55. Trump’s Secretary of War ‘Defence’ Esper said that he did not exclude that there would be more attacks.

Besides the three attacks in Iraq and two in Syria, Donald Trump’s Pentagon yesterday bombed Somalia, killing at least four people.

Trump’s war on Somalia, video


Thi 21 March 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

Is the U.S. at war in Somalia?

“We asked AFRICOM and the Office of Secretary of Defense if the U.S. is at war in Somalia“, says Brian Castner, senior crisis adviser on arms and military operations for Amnesty International. “They have told us they’re using the laws of war. … So if you’re using the manual of war, the laws of war, does that mean you’re at war in Somalia? And they wouldn’t answer.”

Donald Trump’s war in Somalia


This 5 March 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

Inside the Secretive U.S. Air War in Somalia: How Many Civilians Have Died as Strikes Escalate?

The Trump administration is rapidly escalating a secretive air war in Somalia. According to the think tank New America, at least 252 people have been killed in around two dozen U.S. airstrikes in Somalia so far this year. The U.S. has already carried out more strikes in Somalia in 2019 than in any single year under President Obama.

In addition to the air war, the Pentagon reportedly has about 500 U.S. troops on the ground in Somalia, including many special operations forces. For years, the U.S. has attempted to aid the Somali government by targeting members of al-Shabab, but the effort has increased dramatically under Trump, and it has come with little congressional oversight or media attention.

We speak with Amanda Sperber, a freelance journalist who reports from Nairobi, Kenya, and Mogadishu, Somalia. Her new article for The Nation is titled “Inside the Secretive US Air Campaign in Somalia.”

This 5 March 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

U.S. airstrikes in Somalia have tripled under Trump

The U.S. airstrike campaign in Somalia is killing civilians, despite the military’s claim otherwise, and journalist Amanda Sperber wrote for The Nation just how deadly the campaign has been.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019: US accused of war crimes in Somalia. Amnesty International accuses Washington of failing to adequately investigate allegations of civilian casualties during the drone and aircraft attacks: here.

New aloe species discovery in Somaliland


This 14 February 2019 video is called Aloe sanginalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland.

From ScienceDaily:

Aloe sanguinalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland

February 14, 2019

Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap. Its can easily be spotted from the road, but the species has only just been named and described in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

It remains a mystery how this beautiful and showy aloe species has remained undescribed by science for so long, but one of the theory is that the plant was ‘hiding in plain sight”‘ in an area not usually known for its hight biological diversity.

The locals in the area have long known that the plants were different from other kinds of “Dacar”, (the Somali name for Aloes) in the region and were referring to them as “Dacar cas” or “Red aloe.”

Similarly, the scientific name for the new species — Aloe sanguinalis — is based on one of its most distinct characters, its bright red color, coming from the peculiar blood-red sap the plant produces. The leaves also become reddish as they mature.

The story of the formal recognition of “Dacar cas” or Aloe sanguinalis, however, began when Ahmed Awale, a leading Somaliland environmentalist, spotted the large, reddish clumps plants, while driving through the country on behalf of Candlelight, an NGO focused on the environment, education, and health.

Later on, when the plant came to the attention of Mary Barkworth, a botanist interested in building botanical capacity in Somaliland. After listening to Ahmed, the two of them began looking formally into the possibility that “Dacar cas” was, indeed, an undescribed species. They were soon convinced it was. After the initial excitement, the next step required demonstrating that “Dacar Cas” differs from all the other 600+ known species of Aloe. That step took longer, but finally it has been done.

“This news comes from a region which had experienced periods of conflict and instability, climate change effects and accelerated environmental degradation, whereby much of the people’s attention has been focused on promoting livelihoods and resilience. With this positive piece of information we hope that we inspire scientists to further explore the area,” explains Dr Barkworth.

The new species is currently known from only two locations, but it is hoped that naming and sharing pictures of it online will encourage discovery and documentation of additional locations.

Air strike on Somali children, hospital


This 2015 music video is called Little Girl from Somalia.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

School and hospital hit by an air strike in Somalia

AT LEAST three children were killed in Somalia today when their school was hit by an air strike in the south of the country.

Their school in the town of Sakow was bombed, along with the main hospital which is said to have been destroyed. …

The area is subjected to regular bombing raids by the US and Kenya as part of the multinational African Union force.

The air force of Ethiopia attacks Somalia regularly as well.

Somalia is one of the shadow wars that Washington is waging in Africa, with little or no information provided to the public, much less even a shred of popular approval: here.

Outcry after reporter ‘beaten by police’ in Somalia: here.

Pentagon war on Somalia


This video from the USA says about itself:

US Building Bases & Deploying Troops To Somalia

8 May 2018

The U.S. military is dramatically expanding its operations at a former Soviet air strip in Somalia, constructing more than 800 beds at the Baledogle base, VICE News has learned. The construction at the secretive base marks the latest example of America’s growing and controversial shadow war in Africa.

Baledogle’s expansion is one part of what appears to be a massive U.S. military infrastructure development project in the Horn of Africa country that will see at least six new U.S. outposts built this year, according to multiple defense contractors who spoke to VICE News.

Somali poetess jailed for poetry


This 2017 video is about Somali poetess Nacima Qorane reading a poem.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Somaliland: Three-year jail sentence for poet who read unity poem

POET Nacima Qorane has been jailed for three years in Somaliland after being found guilty of contempt for reading a unity poem.

She received the sentence in the self-declared republic after she called for Somaliland and Somalia to be reunited.

Prosecutors said she had referred to Somaliland as “a region” and “insulted and defamed its government” by reading the poem in the Somali capital of Mogadishu. The court found that she had brought the state into contempt.

Home to about 4 million people, the area in the north-west of Somalia was formerly a British protectorate, uniting with the former Italian colony in 1960 to form the Somali Republic. It declared its independence in 1991 following a bitter civil war but is not recognised internationally, being seen as an autonomous region of the country.

In February Somaliland allowed the United Arab Emirates to open a military base to launch strikes against Yemen’s Houthi rebels in the country’s ongoing civil war.

Ms Qorane was arrested in January after returning from the Somali capital and rights groups have raised concerns over her treatment.

A number of artists and reporters have been sentenced for similar offences as Somaliland’s government cracks down on opposition voices and press freedom.

Journalists Mohamed Abdilaahi Dabshid and Ahmed Dirie Liltire were sentenced to two years in prison in January for reporting that Ethiopian militants were training in Somaliland. Others have received jail terms for spreading so-called false news.

Somaliland’s Human Rights Centre called for the immediate release of Ms Qorane yesterday and said it was “very concerned” about her conviction.

Guleid Ahmed Jama said: “Freedom of expression is enshrined and protected by the constitution of Somaliland. We urge the government of Somaliland to respect its own constitution.”