Big anti-nazi march in Germany


A demonstrator in Dresden, Germany holds a sign that reads ‘refugees welcome’ on Saturday. Photograph: Oliver Killig/dpa/Corbis

From AFP news agency:

German pro-immigrant protest welcomes asylum seekers to Dresden

Anti-Nazi Alliance organisers estimate 5,000 people took part in march through Pegida stronghold in response to rightwing protests against migrants

Sunday 30 August 2015 01.05 BST

Thousands of people took to the streets of the German city of Dresden on Saturday to send a message of welcome to refugees after a string of violent anti-migrant protests in the region.

Led by protesters holding a huge banner that read “Prevent the pogroms of tomorrow today”, the crowds marched peacefully through the eastern city under the watch of police in riot gear.

“Say it loud, say it clear, refugees are welcome here,” they chanted.

Police said 1,000 people took part in the protest, which was called by the Anti-Nazi Alliance, while organisers put the numbers at 5,000.

Dresden is the stronghold of the anti-Islam Pegida movement, whose demonstrations drew up to 25,000 people at the start of the year.

The eastern state of Saxony, of which Dresden is the capital, has suffered a series of ugly anti-migrant protests, with the government saying on Friday it was sending police reinforcements to the state.

“We’re here because what is happening in Germany, particularly in Saxony, is unbearable,” said Eva Mendl, a teacher who was among the demonstrators.

“Hating refugees, who live here because they can no longer live at home, because they have been through a war … that shouldn’t happen in a rich country,” she added.

Afterwards, several hundred participants in the rally gathered in the nearby town of Heidenau, which has been the theatre of protests over the opening of a new refugee centre.

Local authorities had initially banned all outdoor public gatherings in the town of 16,000 this weekend, fearing a repeat of last weekend’s clashes between police and far-right protesters in which several dozen people were injured.

But the federal constitutional court on Saturday struck down the ban, paving the way for the pro-refugee rally, which passed off peacefully, with refugees and their supporters dancing together in the street.

Germany is struggling to absorb a vast wave of asylum seekers that is expected to reach a record 800,000 this year.

Chancellor Angela Merkel was booed by far-right activists during a visit to Heidenau’s new refugee centre this week, with about 200 people shouting “traitor, traitor” at her.

Nazi violence, anti-nazi pro refugee demonstration in Germany


Welcome party for refugees in Heidenau, Germany

This video is about the welcome party for refugees from wars in Heidenau, Germany, yesterday. The caption of the photo says (translated):

The deputy leader of the Left Party, Caren Lay, takes part in the welcoming party in Heidenau. She said: “I am delighted that the festival can take place thanks to the court decision, the Saxon CDU [‘center right’ governing party] has once again demonstrated their complete failure in the asylum policy. And because they have been doing nothing for years when one needs to combat the right-wing mob, it bears partial responsibility for the situation!”

Translated from weekly stern in Germany today:

Pirna – In Pirna in Saxony an office of the Left Party has been attacked in the night. Unknown attackers destroyed in the district office five window panes and damaged the front door, as police in Dresden said. Whether there is a connection with the xenophobic protests in neighboring Heidenau, the police could not say. Heidenau itself has remained calm after protests by the far right. Left-wing groups in Dresden have called for a demonstration today for the protection of refugees and against the government’s asylum policy in Germany.

See also here.

German neo-nazis, the political establishment and anti-refugee violence


This video says about itself:

Germany: Protesters march for refugee rights as Interior Minister arrives in Magdeburg

25 August 2015

Refugees and pro-refugee activists took part in a “March against racist asylum laws” in Magdeburg, Tuesday, marching from the city centre to the Regiocom GmbH headquarters where German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere made an appearance.

By Christoph Dreier in Germany:

Attacks on refugee camp encouraged by German government’s right-wing policies

26 August 2015

Right-wing extremists attacked refugee accommodations over the weekend in the small town of Heidenau near Dresden. Over three successive nights they repeatedly attacked police and left-wing counter-demonstrators with fireworks and stones, all while chanting Nazi slogans.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (Christian Democrats, CDU) Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel (Social Democrats, SPD) and other politicians released official statements in which they condemned the violence against refugees. But the crocodile tears being shed cannot disguise the fact that the state apparatus and the German government’s right-wing policies contributed considerably to the violence.

The attacks came as no surprise; the fascist National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) registered a demonstration to pass through Heidenau on Friday. On social media and in forums, right-wing extremists urged “blockades” and “civil war” to stop the plan to open the housing for refugees over the weekend.

Despite this, only 135 police officers were present. Encouraged by this balance of forces, between 600 and 1,000 right-wing extremist demonstrators entered the empty warehouse, which was due to begin accommodating asylum seekers on Saturday. They attacked police with stones and fireworks, injuring 31 officers. Nazi and anti-immigrant slogans were repeatedly chanted, such as “We are the people,” “Foreigners Out!” and “national resistance.” “Sieg Heil!” calls were also heard.

Even after this experience, the contingent of police was strengthened by 40 to 175 officers for the opening of the accommodation on Saturday. In addition, 150 people gathered in front of the building to demonstrate their solidarity with the refugees.

After right-wing extremists once again gathered at the warehouse on Saturday evening, throwing stones and fireworks, the police called on the supporters of the refugees to end their demonstration on the grounds that their security could not be guaranteed. In subsequent clashes, more police were injured. The first refugees were brought into the accommodation under police escort.

On Sunday, a large contingent of officers was deployed, two water cannons were set up and a so-called control zone was established in a 500-metre radius around the camp, within which police could search individuals merely on suspicion, issue expulsions, and ban people from the area.

But the state power was ultimately deployed more against counter-demonstrators who had travelled to the town from Leipzig and Dresden, rather than the right-wing vandals. As the protesters clashed with right-wing extremists at a petrol station, the police deployed tear gas and rubber bullets, and according to eyewitnesses forced the left-wing demonstrators to the train station and onto trains. There were no further attacks on the refugee centre on Sunday.

Confronted with this chronology of events, the question is posed: to what extent were the attacks encouraged by the Saxony state government, or at least tolerated by it? Shaghayegh, a 30-year-old activist from the Asylum Seekers Movement who was in the area on Friday and Saturday, said in an interview with the Süddeutsche Zeitung that even the choice of accommodation had been dubious.

“The question we are asking ourselves is why accommodate refugees in a town like this,” Shaghayegh said. Heidenau has a strong right-wing scene. At the most recent town council elections, the NPD secured 7.5 percent of the vote. In addition, the warehouse, left unoccupied for two years, is not a fit place for people to live in. A total of 600 refugees are to be housed in one large room.

Similar scenes played out 15 kilometres away in the state capital, Dresden. According to doctors, at a tent camp for 800 refugees that was established earlier this year, human rights were trampled underfoot. There were insufficient sanitary facilities and inadequate medical care.

The NPD organised demonstrations in July against the refugees in Dresden. Left-wing counter-demonstrators were attacked by right-wing extremists, and several counter-demonstrators were seriously injured.

These are not isolated cases. According to official government figures, there were 200 attacks on refugee centres during the first six months of the year. Remarkably, 42 of them took place in Saxony. However, the state takes in only around 5 percent of all refugees.

The reason for this is that the connections between the government and the right-wing extremist milieu are particularly close in Saxony. The judiciary, police and domestic intelligence agency have been targeting Nazi elements for years, while the right-wing extremists continue with their activities unhindered.

Last year, the right-wing Pegida movement was systematically built up. The anti-Islamic group, which had its centre in Dresden, immediately won the support of the state office for political education. Along with SPD leader Sigmar Gabriel, several members of the state government spoke out in favour of a “dialogue” with the right-wing radicals.

In addition, the government of Saxony has adopted the programme of the far right in recent years. Two weeks ago, Saxony CDU General Secretary Michael Kretschmer welcomed the Hungarian plan to build a 175-kilometre long fence along its border with Serbia.

The state spokesman for interior affairs in the CDU, Christian Hartmann, even called for the reintroduction of border controls within the European Union. Last year, Saxony’s interior minister Markus Ulbig urged the creation of a special police unit to target asylum seekers committing criminal offences.

The ability of the neo-Nazi mob to run riot again in Germany is the direct product of these right-wing politics, not only at state level but also throughout the country. Right-wing extremist forces have been encouraged by a refugee policy that is openly based on deterrence.

The unrest involving ultra right-wing elements has in turn been exploited by politicians and the media to justify renewed attacks on refugees. Even as the violence in Heidenau continued, Peter Karstens published a comment in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung headlined “The downside of the open culture.” In it he criticised the fact that, “in a climate of misunderstood tolerance and laziness,” politicians for years had avoided “deporting rejected asylum seekers.”

Then he cited the interior spokesman for the CDU/Christian Social Union parliamentary faction, Stefan Mayer, who said, “The inadequate level of deportations of rejected asylum seekers is one of the main problems in overcoming the tense asylum seeker situation.”

The foul propaganda against refugees and immigrants can only be understood in a broader political context. A policy is being carried out against refugees, in collaboration with right-wing forces, which is in reality aimed against all workers. The basic social and democratic rights denied to refugees today will be called into question in general tomorrow. A policy like that being imposed by the German government in Greece, and the preparation of new wars, are not compatible with democratic rights for the working class.

It is thus all the more cynical when representatives of all the establishment political parties respond to attacks on refugees by calling for the further strengthening of the state apparatus, which is itself responsible for organising the misery faced by refugees.

Saxony’s representative for external affairs, Geert Mackenroth (CDU), has already announced the deployment of “professional security services”, as well as video surveillance and bans on demonstrations. Such security services have been in the headlines many times over the past year for torturing and severely abusing refugees.

FOLLOWING THE SEA OF EUROPEAN MIGRANTS Documenting the mass exodus from the Middle East and Afghanistan. [NYT]

Around 50 refugees and asylum seekers were found dead in the hold of a boat off the coast of Libya Wednesday morning. While rescuers were able to save 439 other people on board, the latest reports indicated that 51 people had died: here.

Up To 50 Refugees Suffocate In Back Of Truck In Austria, Local Media Says: here.

AUSTRIAN MIGRANT TRUCK HORROR WORSENS Investigators say more than 70 bodies have been found in an truck abandoned on the Austrian autobahn. The refugees most likely suffocated to death. [Reuters]

Neo-nazis attack pro-refugee Germans


Pro-refugee demonstrators in Heidenau, Germany, with 'Stop nazis' sign, photo by Florian Boillot

Translated from daily Junge Welt in Germany today, about yesterday evening 23 August 2015, in Heidenau town near Dresden, where neo-nazis had earlier violently attacked refugees from the war in Syria and police:

Again, only 170 police officers were deployed. With little preparation there were about 250 anti-fascists in the town to demonstrate against the right-wing violence. Every now and then, refugees dared to come out of the shelter and to thank the demonstrators for their solidarity. Police concentrated their attention on the leftist demonstrators while meanwhile in the background violent hooligans and neo-Nazis prepared a new attack.

Repeated shouting of “Sieg Heil” [Third Reich slogan, illegal in Germany] and other provocations were not punished by police. Instead, the police announced they were no longer able to guarantee security. By nightfall, the situation had become more threatening, said photojournalist Christian Ditsch against jW. … Shortly before 23 o’clock up to 150 neo-Nazis attacked in a coordinated way anti-fascists and police. Stones, bottles and dangerous fireworks flew. “The police took no action against that, they were afraid”, Ditsch continued. At least this time one violent perpetrator was arrested [which had not happened during earlier nazi anti-refugee violence in Heidenau].

Pro-refugee demonstrators in Heidenau

Music drives away neo-nazis in Manchester, England


This video from England says about itself:

2 EDL splinter group NWI members arrested in Manchester

23 August 2015

Two members of the North West Infidels (NWI), a far-right splinter group from the English Defence League (EDL), were arrested during a protest rally in Manchester City Centre yesterday against “radical Islam, Zionism, Communism, Irish Republicanism and the militant left.”

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Protesters trolled a far-right group by blasting house music at a neo-Nazi march in Manchester

Members of the far-right group allegedly threw bananas at black people in the crowd, whilst shouting “You’re not British any more”

Siobhan Fenton

Sunday 23 August 2015

Anti-fascist protesters in Manchester have used house music to drown out far-right protestors.

Two groups called The Far Right Infidels and Combat 18

The number ’18’ in the name of the nazi group Combat 18 stands for the first and eighth letters of the alphabet=AH=Adolf Hitler.

attempted to stage the event on Saturday in the city centre. Members appeared to perform Nazi salutes and one was seen wearing Ku Klux Klan robes.

The Manchester Evening News reports that some members threw bananas at black members of the public, whilst shouting “You’re not British anymore.”

Read more

Liverpool fascist march cancelled after barely anyone turns up
Organiser of anti-Jewish rally arrested over anti-Semitic tweets to MP
The humiliation of Neo-Nazis in Liverpool makes me proud to be a Scouser

However, just 40 far-right members turned up to their planned event in total, meaning that they were vastly outnumbered by the 200 anti-fascist counter protesters who also attended.

The latter blasted house music to drown out the sound of the white supremacist groups’ speeches and slogans.

They chanted: “Master race? You’re having a laugh” and “You don’t live in Cheetham Hill or Moss Side- you must be from Emmerdale.”

After an hour, the far-right group were escorted onto a bus and driven out of town.

Emma Leyla Mohareb, from the anti-austerity group The Party Protest, told The Manchester Evening News: “The atmosphere at the protest was brilliant- it was nice to see everyone say ‘no’ to racism in our city.”

Last week, a similar far-right event called the ‘White Man March’ was planned by Neo-Nazis to take place in Liverpool. However, it had to be cancelled after barely anyone turned up and hundreds of locals attended pro-diversity counter protests.

See also here.

German neo-nazis’ anti-refugee violence


German anti-refugee demonstrators with flag from Emperor Wilhelm and Adolf Hitler days, photo by DPA

This photo shows anti-refugee demonstrators near Dresden, Germany, with a black-white-red German national flag from Emperor Wilhelm II‘s and Adolf Hitler‘s days. It was replaced just after World War I and after World War II with another, black-red-gold coloured German flag. The black-white-red flag shows nostalgia for dictatorship.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Dresden riots: Protesters in Germany attack refugee buses shouting ‘foreigners out

Shehab Kahn

Saturday 22 August 2015

Up to 1,000 protesters have clashed with police in eastern Germany in riots reportedly sparked by the arrival of 250 migrants.

Police said protesters shouting “foreigners out” and carrying banners against the “asylum flood” threw bottles and stones at busloads of asylum seekers arriving in Heidenau, near Dresden.

At least 31 officers were hurt in violent scuffles as police used tear gas to disperse crowds. …

The protest was hijacked by a group of far-right radicals, many belonging to the militant National Democratic Party (NPD), considered a neo-Nazi organisation. …

Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the influx of asylum seekers is the biggest problem Europe currently faces.

The European Union’s migrant ‘emergency’ is entirely of its own making, by
Ruben Andersson. We could treat asylum and labour mobility as questions of justice or opportunity, as some European states did in the postwar era: here.

English nazis cancel Liverpool march for lack of participants


This video from England says about itself:

15th August 2015 – Nazis advertise a “white man march” through Liverpool and get a nasty shock when outnumbered hundreds to one by anti fascists opposed to racism.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Liverpool fascist march cancelled after barely anyone turns up

“Whenever the city is bullied or intimidated or threatened we all come together and we stand together”

Siobhan Fenton

Sunday 16 August 2015

Neo-Nazis have called off a march in Liverpool, amid reports that they were vastly outnumbered by anti-fascist protesters.

The far-right group National Action had planned a ‘White Man March’ through the streets of Liverpool yesterday.

They had claimed that 150 of their supporters would be attending the rally and had written to the local council threatening to unleash “a National Action-packed weekend of ethnically enriched chaos and mayhem” if they were not given permission to march.

However, the Liverpool Echo reports that few members materialised and the group cancelled the event yesterday afternoon.

According to the Anti-Fascist Network, some members of the march were forced to take shelter in a lost property section after being bombarded with missiles.

Posted by Anti-Fascist Network on Saturday, August 15, 2015

Mersey Police confirmed that the organisers had made the decision to cancel the event. They said that six people were arrested as a result of unrest at the marches, but it was not yet known whether those involved were marchers or protesters.

Hundreds of locals attended two counter protests staged by campaign groups Unite Against Fascism and the Anti-Fascist Network. They chanted ‘Nazi scum off our streets’ and ‘Master race, you’re having a laugh’.

Read more

Anti-Nazi couple’s home burnt in Germany by extremists
What happens when you comment on Daily Mail articles with Nazi propaganda

Liverpool City Mayor Joe Anderson said he was proud of the city’s citizens for taking a stand against the far-right group. He said: “I think the reaction that they [White Man Marchers] got in the city was not unexpected. I think the city is, for me, a city that is proud of its tag that we are called ‘the world in one city’.

“I think whenever the city is bullied or intimidated or threatened we all come together and we stand together.”

See also here. And here. And here.

The humiliation of neo-Nazis in Liverpool makes me proud to be a Scouser. If I’ve learned anything in life it’s that you should never to pick a fight with one of us – especially if you’re a fascist: here.