Donald Trump’s defense of racists, reactions to it, Bannon out


This video from the USA says about itself:

Evocative Magazine Covers Call Out Donald Trump On Charlottesville | The 11th Hour | MSNBC

17 August 2017

Using both Nazi & white supremacist imagery, The New Yorker, The Economist, and TIME are using their latest covers to call out Pres. Trump on Charlottesville. Rick Stengel & Gillian Tett react.

Stephen K. Bannon, the embattled chief strategist who helped President Trump win the 2016 election but clashed for months with other senior West Wing advisers, is leaving his post, a White House spokeswoman announced Friday: here.

By Patrick Martin in the USA:

Trump deepens appeal to fascist right

18 August 2017

In a series of tweets Thursday morning, US President Donald Trump intensified his appeal to racist and fascist forces, bemoaning the loss of “beautiful statues and monuments” of Confederate generals like Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Trump’s comments were a calculated overture to the neo-Nazis and white supremacists who rioted in Charlottesville, Virginia last Saturday over efforts to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. In the course of the violence, one neo-Nazi drove his car into a group of peaceful anti-racist protesters, killing a 32-year-old woman, Heather Heyer.

The president provoked widespread popular outrage with his comments at a Tuesday afternoon press briefing at Trump Tower in New York City, where he openly defended the neo-Nazi demonstrators in Charlottesville, saying there were “many fine people” among them, while declaring that anti-racist protesters bore an equal share of the blame for any violence that ensued.

Trump tweeted Thursday, “Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments. You can’t change history, but you can learn from it. Robert E Lee, Stonewall Jackson—who’s next, Washington, Jefferson? So foolish! Also the beauty that is being taken out of our cities, towns and parks will be greatly missed and never able to be comparably replaced!”

Posing as a lover of history, culture and beauty is ludicrous and implausible for someone most famous—before the 2016 election campaign—for hosting a reality TV program and erecting vulgar monuments to his own wealth and celebrity.

Moreover, by equating Washington and Jefferson, leaders of one of the great liberating struggles of mankind, the American Revolution, with the military leadership of the Confederacy, a slaveowners’ rebellion, Trump demonstrates that he knows nothing about American history.

Nonetheless, there is a logic in this seemingly bizarre conduct. Acting on the advice of his fascist advisers, particularly chief political strategist Stephen Bannon, Trump is cultivating a definite social layer of ultra-rightists, white supremacists and outright neo-Nazis.

He is sticking to his guns in the face of near-universal criticism from the media, the Democratic Party and the bulk of the Republican Party, seeking to lay the basis for the development of a fascist movement in the United States, which would combine racism, religious fundamentalism, economic nationalism and militarism.

Trump combined his tweets defending Confederate monuments with blasts against critics within the Republican Party, including senators Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Jeff Flake of Arizona. He even endorsed Flake’s newly announced opponent for the Republican Senate nomination in Arizona in 2018, denouncing Flake as “toxic.”

The neo-Nazi violence in Charlottesville has touched off a wave of protests nationwide against Trump’s public embrace of the white supremacists, as well as actions by local and state governments to shut down Confederate memorials or remove them outright.

The city of Baltimore removed all four of its remaining Confederate statues on Wednesday night, while the state of Virginia and the city of Richmond, between them home to a vast array of Confederate memorials, began taking similar action.

In Durham, North Carolina, a group of protesters pulled down a Confederate statue outside the county courthouse. Eight were arrested—many more than the number of white supremacists arrested after the Charlottesville rampage, although no one was injured in Durham.

The vast majority of Confederate memorials were erected, not in the aftermath of the Civil War itself, but during the era of the imposition of Jim Crow segregation, from 1895 to 1930, and later during the civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s. In both periods, they were directed against demands for equal political and civil rights for African Americans, the descendants of the slaves freed by the Civil War.

The response to Trump’s remarks within the corporate media and the capitalist political establishment has been dominated by fears that the president has too blatantly revealed the orientation of his administration to neo-Nazi and white supremacist forces, thus discrediting the US government both at home and abroad.

Particularly significant is the response of the military brass. Each of the members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the top commanders of the Air Force, Army, Marines, Navy and National Guard, issued statements condemning race hatred and white supremacists, although making no mention of the conciliation of these forces by Trump.

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Joseph Dunford, visiting China for talks on the North Korea crisis, told reporters he agreed with the comments of the other commanders. “I can absolutely and unambiguously tell you there is no place—no place—for racism and bigotry in the US military or in the United States as a whole,” he said, again without mentioning Trump.

These statements were given huge prominence in the daily press, including the New York Times and Washington Post, alongside the condemnations of Trump’s comments by an array of Republican officeholders, senators, representatives and governors, and the walkout from White House advisory panels by dozens of corporate CEOs and bankers.

None of these representatives of the ruling elite objected to Trump’s Muslim ban, his persecution of immigrants, his demands for sweeping cuts in social spending, or his militaristic bullying of countries around the world. Their main concern is that his latest comments have revealed, too openly and crudely, the anti-democratic essence of the American capitalist state, shattering the pretense that the United States is the leader of the “free world” and the advocate of democracy against tyranny and oppression.

Similarly, the Democratic Party politicians have mainly attacked Trump from the right, portraying him as too soft on Vladimir Putin and beholden to Russia for its alleged interference in the 2016 US elections.

The bourgeois critics object not to Trump’s defense of Wall Street and American imperialism, but to the methods he employs, which they regard as too reckless, potentially provoking a movement from below that would threaten the interests of American capitalism as a whole.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration is itself riven with conflicts that reflect the deepening divisions within the ruling elite. Press reports cite widespread (but anonymous) leaks from White House staff and cabinet officials thrown into consternation by the political firestorm that has followed Trump’s public defense of neo-Nazis.

The highest-ranking Jewish member of the White House staff, chairman of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn, former president of Goldman Sachs, was said by the New York Times to be “disgusted” and contemplating resignation—a report that touched off a selloff on Wall Street, with the Dow Jones average down 247 points on Thursday. Other reports suggested that Cohn was hanging on in the expectation that he would be appointed next month to succeed Janet Yellen as chair of the Federal Reserve Board.

A Wall Street Journal column noted that the wave of resignations by CEOs from Trump advisory councils was at least in part sparked by concerns that his increasingly abrasive relations with congressional Republicans would cripple his ability to push through the expected tax cut for corporations and the wealthy, the key issue as far as corporate America was concerned.

Billionaire Rupert Murdoch, owner of the Wall Street Journal and Fox News, was reported to have urged Trump to fire chief strategist Stephen Bannon at a dinner meeting in the White House, as part of an effort to reorganize his administration and redirect it to the main political tasks demanded by the financial aristocracy, especially tax cuts.

Bannon responded with an unusual interview to the liberal publication American Prospect, in which he publicly attacked Cohn and the Treasury Department, headed by another Wall Street multi-millionaire, Steven Mnuchin, for opposing a hardline economic nationalist policy in relation to China.

He gloated over the political impact of the Charlottesville events. “The Democrats,” he said, “the longer they talk about identity politics, I got ’em. I want them to talk about racism every day. If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats.”

The Trump adviser is not talking about an electoral competition, but about the mobilization of ultra-right and fascist forces, along with the police and military, to provide the basis for an authoritarian regime based on war and social austerity.

18 August 2017: In the aftermath of President Donald Trump’s press conference Tuesday, in which he defended those who participated in last weekend’s Nazi and KKK rampage in Charlottesville, the president doubled down in his effort to appeal to far-right forces Thursday morning, tweeting his support for the public display of Confederate statues and monuments. The statues of generals who fought to defend slavery, Trump proclaimed, were “beautiful” and would be “greatly missed and never comparably replaced”: here.

Donald Trump’s remarks on Tuesday defending violent Nazi and white supremacist demonstrators have torn the already threadbare mask from the face of American capitalism. The president of the United States stood before the media to give his support to the “very fine people” involved in the rally in Charlottesville this past weekend, while attacking supposedly “violent” left-wing protesters: here.

Donald Trump’s defense of Nazi and white supremacist protests in Charlottesville that led to the killing of counter-demonstrator Heather Heyer has provoked a deep political crisis in Europe. European states that for decades presented themselves as having built democracy after fascist rule during World War II thanks to Washington’s leadership of the “free world” are scrambling to distance themselves from the White House and denounce Trump’s pro-Nazi opinions: here.

US President Trump and the extreme right


This video from the USA says about itself:

Exclusive: Stonewall Jackson’s Great-Great-Grandsons Call for Removal of Confederate Monuments

17 August 2017

As President Trump faces growing outrage over his response to the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, we bring you an exclusive: an interview with the great-great-grandsons of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. At least 1,500 symbols of the Confederacy can be found in public spaces across the country. But now a number of the monuments are coming down.

Calls for the removal of the statues are even coming from the descendants of the leaders of the Confederacy. We speak with two of the great-great-grandsons of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. Jack and Warren Christian have just written an open letter to the mayor of Richmond calling for the removal of the Stonewall Jackson statue in Richmond. They write, “Our sense of justice leads us to believe that removing the Stonewall statue and other monuments should be part of a larger project of actively mending the racial disparities that hundreds of years of white supremacy have wrought.”

By CJ Atkins in the USA:

Trump‘s common cause with bigots

Thursday 17th August 2017

The president’s manipulative political rhetoric and reactionary policies have emboldened white supremacists, warns CJ ATKINS

USUALLY when David Duke opens his mouth, you can count on the words that come out to be a lie. The former KKK imperial wizard, Holocaust denier and white nationalist typically peddles trash about supposed white genocide or the benefits of racial segregation. But this weekend in Charlottesville, Duke did something unexpected: He told the truth.

Or, at least he told one little piece of truth. Speaking at the neonazi confab in Virginia, Duke proclaimed he and his fellow racists were there “to fulfil the promises of Donald Trump.”

Duke is right.

The fascist terror that took the life of one woman, Heather Heyer, and sent many more people to hospital is precisely the “promise” that has been latent in Trump’s rhetoric ever since the start of his campaign for the presidency.

When Trump said during the election last year that it was time “to take our country back,” he was speaking in words that Duke and his cohort understood perfectly. It wasn’t hard — the message was hardly concealed.

It started years ago, most infamously with the racist “birther” controversy aimed at undermining President Barack Obama. It ramped up dramatically once Trump started running for the White House himself.

There was of course the denunciation of Mexican immigrants as criminals, drug dealers and rapists in his very first speech of the campaign. That was followed up with candidate Trump’s pledge to build a wall along the southern border, sending the signal that certain people — brown-skinned people — were not welcome.

He closed out the election with an ad that was packed full of anti-semitic tropes about “global special interests,” bolstered by the faces of prominent Jewish personalities flashed across the screen. It was a work of television dog-whistling that would have made Jesse Helms proud.

Promptly announcing a ban on Muslims entering the US upon taking office, the president gave another nod to the racists and their notion of a war between civilisations.

In May this year, Trump dismissively responded to the concerns about police brutality raised by Black Lives Matter and other movements by saying that “our police have been subject to unfair defamation and vilification.”

At the beginning of this month, there was the roll-out of a new Republican immigration plan which has been roundly criticised as a project for a whiter US.

The pattern is plain to see for anyone who has been paying attention.

Many of the words and policies of Trump, both before and since taking office, have been a calculated effort to mobilise a hard-core base of supporters motivated by racial resentments and hatred.

His condemnation on Saturday of the “hatred, bigotry and violence from many sides” was another case of his pandering.

The truth is that the hatred, bigotry and violence that were on display in Charlottesville did not come from “many sides.” They came from one side.

But to only single out Trump for emboldening the neonazis that were on the march this weekend would be to deny the credit due to so many others in his administration.

There is Steve Bannon, the “alt-right” ideologue who brought white nationalism right into the Oval Office. Responsible for writing many of Trump’s most inflammatory speeches and sprinkling them with references to white nationalist vocabulary is Stephen Miller.

And of course, we can’t forget Trump adviser Sebastian Gorka, who has been linked to a nazi group in Hungary and just last Wednesday said on Breitbart Radio that white supremacists are not a problem.

Several Republican senators — such as Orrin Hatch of Utah, Marco Rubio of Florida, Chuck Grassley of Iowa and others — took strong positions calling out this weekend’s racist terror for what it was. Some of them even urged President Trump to do so as well.

But where will these same senators be when Trump starts pushing another effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act? Where will they stand when an anti-immigrant Bill comes up for a vote? Will they denounce the racism behind the next iteration of Trump’s Muslim ban?

Trump, the white nationalists around him in the White House and the nazis in Charlottesville are all attempting to sell the whites in US, especially the working-class whites, a false bill of goods.

As the reverend William Barber said on Saturday: “White nationalists don’t care about white US. They don’t support living wages for the working poor. They don’t support healthcare for the poor and the working poor… They support the kind of policies that would take those things from people.”

Barber’s call for a non-violent mass movement of all people to challenge the ideologies that foster racism and the wedge attacks that are used to divide working people points the way forward.

From the start, Trump and his promises to “Make America great again” have been backward-looking. They have encouraged racist sentimentality for a segregationist past when minorities knew their place and multiculturalism was unheard of. His manipulative political rhetoric and reactionary policies have emboldened white supremacist forces and led us to this moment.

If his efforts to strip millions of healthcare, his bombing of Syria and Iraq, his demonisation of an entire religion, his plans to build a border wall or his threat of nuclear war did not make clear how dangerous the continuation of this presidency is, perhaps Charlottesville will.

It was already obvious, but now perhaps more so. It’s time for President Trump to go.

German elite soldiers do nazi salute


This 17 August 2017 German TV video is about the neonazi scandal in the German army elite unit KSK.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

German elite soldiers do Hitler salutes at party’

Today, 13:21

Members of the German military elite unit KSK have done the Hitler salute at a farewell party of a commander. They also listened to right-wing extremist music.

This is what the investigative program Panorama of German public broadcasting ARD reports. The broadcaster bases itself on one source, said to be reliable.

At the party it is also said that pork heads were thrown about …

Pork heads, used to mock Jewish or Muslim dietary laws, often play a role in anti-Semitism and Islamophobia.

The anonymous source, called Anna by the ARD, is said to have been invited by a KSK soldier friend to serve as chief prize for the commander. That meant she would have sex with him.

Anna agreed to this … . Sex did not happen because the commander was said to have been too drunk.

Right-extremist rock band

Later in the evening, at the campfire, music by Sturmwehr, a right-wing extremist rock band, sounded. Just before the chorus, an elderly military man said it was time to raise their right hands and do the nazi salute.

According to Anna, four soldiers obeyed this call, including the commander. There is said to have been an euphoric mood, with singing along to the music massively.

Investigation

The German army is investigating the events at the party. A spokesman has confirmed to the ARD that indeed pork heads had been thrown about, but as long as the investigation is in progress, they would not make any statements about the music and the doing of the nazi salutes.

It is clear that the KSK and the German army have a big problem if the allegations prove to be correct. The German army was already in the news negatively earlier this year when it turned out that an officer disguising himself as a refugee wanted to commit a terrorist attack in order to incite xenophobia.

Rupert Murdoch’s Sun daily nazi-style hatemongering


This video from England says about itself:

Liverpool’s Boycott Of [Rupert Murdoch‘s] The S*n: As Relevant Now As In 1989

13 April 2017

It’s 28 years since Kelvin MacKenzie presented a press agency report sourced from senior members of South Yorkshire Police and Tory MP Irvine Patnick on the front page of The S*n as ‘The Truth’ of what happened at Hillsborough on April 15, 1989.

The newspaper has been boycotted in Liverpool ever since.

In more recent times, newer campaigns ­– Total Eclipse Of The S*n and Shun The S*n – have pushed for retailers in the city not to sell The S*n, while in February of this year Liverpool FC announced S*n journalists are not welcome in Anfield’s press box or at the Melwood training ground.

Earlier this month, Roger Alton argued in [Conservative weekly] The Spectator that the club’s ban is wrong. Here Gareth Roberts argues the opposite, and says the ban, and the boycott, are as relevant as ever.

By Steve Sweeney in Britain:

Corbyn slams ‘nazi-like’ Islamophobia in the Sun

Thursday 17th August 2017

Labour leader among 108 MPs condemning article on the ‘Muslim problem’

JEREMY CORBYN joined more than 100 MPs in condemning the “nazi-like language” used in a hate-filled Sun newspaper column that called for a “solution” to the “Muslim problem.”

The Labour leader said recent stories published by the right-wing tabloid “incite Islamophobia and stigmatise entire communities,” which is “wrong and dangerous and must be condemned … in the clearest possible terms.”

He was speaking out after Sun columnist Trevor Kavanagh suggested it was “acceptable to say Muslims are a specific rather than a cultural problem.”

Writing about recent sex gang convictions, Mr Kavanagh claimed that “the common denominator is Islam.”

And he concluded his venomous tirade by asking: “What will we do about the Muslim problem then?”

Mr Corbyn said: “With hate crimes against Muslims on the rise in Britain and neonazis inciting violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, we must stand in solidarity and unity with all our communities and not let hate divide us.”

A letter initiated by Labour MP Naz Shah and signed by 107 of her parliamentary colleagues called for Sun editor Tony Gallagher to “not only retract the article” but to “strongly consider whether Mr Kavanagh’s brand of bigotry fits with your vision for the paper.”

The letter said there was “little doubt” that Mr Kavanagh was comparing Muslims to the supposed “Jewish problem” — which led to the genocide of six million people in the nazis’ “Final Solution.”

Before Kavanagh, his ex-Murdoch media colleague, professional racist Katie Hopkins, had already demanded a “final solution” of the “Muslim problem”.

Press freedom campaigners said the publication of the column exposed the toothlessness of print media regulator the Independent Press Standards Organisation (Ipso), which replaced the Press Complaints Commission in 2014.

Jewish and Muslim groups have complained to the regulator, but they fear it is powerless because the editors’ code offers religious and ethnic groups no protection against discrimination.

Mediawise spokesman Mike Jempson told the Star: “Public shaming of Trevor Kavanagh’s dog whistling in Murdoch’s Sun may be the only way to demonstrate abhorrence of his views.

“He explained that a comment column counts as “freedom of expression” falling outside the terms of the editors’ code, monitored by Ipso.

While it allows individuals who have been identified in news articles to complain about discrimination, there is no protection against generalised comments.

“In other words, complaints about much of the content of Julius Streicher’s Der Sturmer [a nazi newspaper] would not be upheld by Ipso if it were being published today.”

Ipso confirmed that it had received 227 complaints about the column.

The National Union of Journalists called on the press watchdog to carry out an immediate investigation into the prevalence of Islamophobia, racism and hatred being espoused in British newspapers following Mr Kavanagh’s article.

Heather Heyer anti-nazi solidarity vigils in England


This video from England says about itself:

Solidarity with Charlottesville anti fascists, US embassy, London. 14th August 2017.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Vigils will mark US protester’s murder

Tuesday 15th August 2017

SOLIDARITY vigils are set to be held in northern England in memory of an anti-fascist campaigner murdered in the US state of Virginia.

Heather Heyer, 32, died when a racist drove his car at speed into a group of demonstrators opposing a rally staged by the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacists in Charlottesville on Saturday.

In Manchester, a solidarity vigil will take place today at St Peter’s Square, in front of the city’s central library, from 6.30pm to 7.30pm.

It has been organised by Greater Manchester Unite Against Fascism. For more details contact northwest@uaf.org.uk.

Another vigil will take place in Leeds tomorrow at 5pm, outside Leeds Art Gallery in the Headrow.

It is being staged by the city’s Unite Against Fascism, Black Lives Matter, Stand Up To Trump, and Stand Up To Racism groups.

James Fields, 20, has been arrested and charged with murder over Saturday’s attack, in which dozens of people were hurt.

Members of the Yazidi Sinjar Women’s Units (YJŞ) currently fighting the Islamic State [ISIS; neither Islamic nor a state] in its self-declared capital Raqqa [in Syria], have sent an exclusive photograph to The Region in which they commemorate Heather Heyer, the anti-fascist activist killed in Charlottesville: here.

MORE CEOs ARE QUITTING OVER TRUMP’S RESPONSE TO CHARLOTTESVILLE ” Three CEOs on the White House manufacturing council resigned in protest Monday over President Donald Trump’s botched response to a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.” While Trump did condemn hate groups on Monday, his response has been considered too little, too late. [HuffPost]

THE CHARLOTTESVILLE CAR ATTACK SUSPECT HAD BEEN ACCUSED OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE MULTIPLE TIME James Alex Fields Jr.’s own mother had called the police on him at least three times. And the mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed when Fields Jr. allegedly drove a car into the crowd Saturday, has a powerful message. [HuffPost]

Demonstrators pulled down this Confederate statue in Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Heather Heyer murdered by US nazi, her mother speaks


This 14 August 2017 video from the USA is called Mother of Charlottesville victim speaks.

By Rebecca Shapiro in the USA today:

Heather Heyer’s Mom Has Powerful Message For Driver Who Killed Her Daughter

“You have ruined your life. … You took my child from me, and I’m going to be the voice she can no longer be.”

Susan Bro’s daughter Heather Heyer, 32, was killed Saturday when a car plowed into a group gathered to protest a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. At least 19 others were injured in the attack.

Bro sat down with CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Monday night and shared a message with the driver who rammed the crowd.

“I believe that he thought hate was going to be the answer and that hate is going to fix things,” Bro said. “But he was wrong, and he will someday come to see that, I hope, and I’m sorry for the pain he will go through when he sees that. I’m sorry for the pain he’s putting his mother through right now.”

Bro added, “I’m also extremely sorry that he chose to kill my child and to injure a bunch of other people. He didn’t have the right to do that … This wasn’t a video game, buddy. This was real people. There are real consequences to what you did, and I’m sorry you chose to do that. You have ruined your life. You’ve disturbed mine. You took my child from me, and I’m going to be the voice she can no longer be.”

Police charged 20-year-old white supremacist James Alex Fields Jr. of Ohio with second-degree murder and three counts of malicious wounding and failing to stop at an accident that resulted in a death. Fields had been previously accused of domestic violence.

Over the weekend, Bro told HuffPost that she did not want her daughter’s death to be a focus for more hatred. “I want her death to be a rallying cry for justice and equality and fairness and compassion,” she said.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Mother of Woman Killed at Charlottesville Rally Talks About Her ‘Passion for Justice’

14 August 2017

Heather Heyer was killed at the Charlottesville, Virginia rally. One day after her death, her mother, Susan Bro, is speaking out about her daughter’s passion for justice and equality.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Site of Charlottesville victim’s death becomes a memorial

14 August 2017

The Charlottesville, Virginia community hopes to find love and healing in the wake of a violent clash between white supremacists and pro-equality protesters that ended in the death of Heather Heyer, a 32-year-old woman who had come to stand against the neo-Nazis, nationalists and “alt-righters” who comprised the Unite the Right rally. One of those men, James Fields Jr., stands charged with her murder.

This video from Arizona in the USA says about itself:

Local Phoenix rally after violence in Virginia

14 August 2017

A protest march was planned for Monday to send a message against racism and hate.

Donald Trump Just Retweeted A Notorious Right-Wing ‘Pizzagate’ Troll. One critic called it “sickening”: here.

Murderous nazi terrorism in Charlottesville, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Survivor of White Supremacist Attack in Charlottesville: There’s No Question, This was Terrorism

14 August 2017

We spend the hour examining the “Unite the Right” white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend that erupted into violence, resulting in three deaths. After a torchlit march of hundreds on the University of Virginia campus Friday night, more than 1,000 white nationalists descended on the city on Saturday to oppose a plan to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a city park.

They were met by anti-racist counterdemonstrators, and fights broke out before the rally began. Witnesses report police did little to intervene. Shortly after the protest began, a man later identified as James Alex Fields drove his vehicle into a crowd of counterdemonstrators in what many are calling an act of terrorism. A local paralegal named Heather Heyer was killed in the attack, and at least 19 others were injured. Two Virginia state troopers also died Saturday when their helicopter crashed en route to the scene of the violence.

On Saturday, Trump addressed reporters at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, blaming the violence in Charlottesville on “many sides.” We begin our roundtable discussion with Brandy Gonzalez, who survived the car rampage, and Lisa Moore, a registered nurse who assisted a victim of the car attack.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Rev. Traci Blackmon: The Trump Administration Is Giving Permission to Hate

14 August 2017

On Saturday, President Trump addressed reporters at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, blaming the violence in Charlottesville on “many sides.” We get response from Rev. Traci Blackmon, executive minister of Justice and Witness Ministries of the United Church of Christ. “What is happening under this current administration is permission to hate,” Blackmon says.

This video from the USA says about itself:

Cornel West & Rev. Traci Blackmon: Clergy in Charlottesville Were Trapped by Torch-Wielding Nazis

14 August 2017

We continue our roundtable discussion on violence that erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend as thousands of neo-Nazis, KKK members and other white nationalists began descending on the city to participate in the “Unite the Right” rally.

Thousands of counterprotesters met in Charlottesville, including clergy, students, Black Lives Matter activists, and protesters with the antifascist movement known as “antifa.” We are joined by two clergy members and a local Black Lives Matter activist who helped organize the demonstration. Rev. Traci Blackmon is executive minister of Justice and Witness Ministries of the United Church of Christ.

During a live interview with MSNBC at the march on Saturday, she was forced to flee as counterprotesters were attacked around her. Cornel West was also on site and describes the scene. We also speak with Jalane Schmidt, an associate professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia.

This video from the USA says about itself:

UVA Prof on UVA‘s Historical Ties to KKK & White Nationalist Alums Richard Spencer & Jason Kessler

14 August 2017

Jalane Schmidt, an organizer with the local Black Lives Matter movement and an associate professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia, describes the school’s history of connections to the KKK and its alumnus, white nationalist leader Richard Spencer.