Juncker wants European Union army


This video says about itself:

11 July 2013

Luxembourg spying scandal breaks former Eurogroup President Jean-Claude Juncker’s government.

When Jean-Claude Juncker was prime minister of Luxembourg, he was in the news because of a scandal of the Luxembourg secret police. They were involved in bomb terrorism to get more taxpayers’ money. Juncker had to resign as prime minister because of that scandal.

A bit later, Juncker became boss of the European Union bureaucracy. Then, he turned out to be involved in yet another scandal: the ‘Luxleaks’ scandal of illegal tax privileges for corporations.

Today, Mr Juncker is in the news again. This time for making militarist propaganda: forgetting there are already far too many armies in the world, he wants one more.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Jean-Claude Juncker calls for EU army

European commission president says this military development would persuade Russia the bloc is serious about defending its values

Andrew Sparrow

Sunday 8 March 2015 16.26 GMT

The Guardian article does not mention, and Juncker did not mention, as far as I know, that already today, there is not an official European Union army, but something close to it: the European Union Military Staff. The commander of its ‘department of crisis response and current operations’ used to be Greek general Georgios Epitideios. Also in Brussels, Epiteidios was senior staff member of Nato’s Central Command.

Recently, General Epitideios came back to Brussels. This time as Member of the European Parliament for the Greek nazi party Golden Dawn. Does Mr Juncker want someone like neo-nazi General Epitideios as European Army commander? It would surely make for a better relationship with people in the armed forces of the Kiev government in Ukraine who wear swastikas and SS signs on their helmets and clothes [sarcasm off].

The European Union needs its own army to help address the problem that it is not “taken entirely seriously” as an international force, the president of the European commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, said in an interview published on Sunday.

He said such a move would help the EU to persuade Russia that it was serious about defending its values in the face of the threat posed by Moscow.

“You would not create a European army to use it immediately,” Juncker told the Welt am Sonntag newspaper in Germany.

“But a common army among the Europeans would convey to Russia that we are serious about defending the values of the European Union.”

Juncker, who has been a longstanding advocate of an EU army, said getting EU member states to combine militarily would make spending more efficient and would encourage further European integration.

“Such an army would help us design a common foreign and security policy,” the former prime minister of Luxembourg said.

“Europe’s image has suffered dramatically and also in terms of foreign policy, we don’t seem to be taken entirely seriously.”

Juncker also said he did not want a new force to challenge the role of Nato. In Germany some political figures expressed support for Juncker’s idea, but in Britain the government insisted that the idea was unacceptable.

A UK government spokesman said: “Our position is crystal clear that defence is a national – not an EU – responsibility and that there is no prospect of that position changing and no prospect of a European army.”

In the past David Cameron, the UK prime minister, has blocked moves to create EU-controlled military forces saying that, although defence cooperation between member states is desirable, “it isn’t right for the European Union to have capabilities, armies, air forces and all the rest of it”.

Mike Hookem, a defence spokesman for Ukip, said … that having British soldiers serve as part of an EU army would leave Britain unable to defend Gibraltar from the [fellow European Union] Spanish or the Falkland Islands from the Argentinians. …

But in Germany Ursula von der Leyen, the defence minister, said in a statement that “our future as Europeans will one day be a European army”, although she added “not in the short term”. She said such a move would “strengthen Europe’s security” and “strengthen a European pillar in the transatlantic alliance”.