Woodpeckers, blue jays, blackbirds in New York


This 6 October 2020 video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Blue Jays, a Red-bellied Woodpecker, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Common Grackles trade time at the Cornell Feeders in Ithaca, NY. Blue Jays and Red-bellied Woodpeckers are year-round residents in the woods surrounding the feeders, but the blackbirds and grackles are short-distance migrants on their way south! Who’s showing up at your bird feeder today?

Rose-breasted grosbeak in New York, USA


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak Visits Cornell Feeders On Sunny Day – July 2, 2020

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks often visit bird feeders, like the ones on the Cornell Lab FeederWatch cam, where they eat sunflower seeds as well as safflower seeds and raw peanuts. Even if you live outside their summer range you may still catch one visiting during spring or fall migration if you keep your feeders stocked.

Birds at New York feeders, video


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Birds Forage On Sunny Day At Cornell Feeders – May 21, 2020

Want to see orioles, blue jays, or woodpeckers? We’ve got at the Cornell Lab FeederWatch cam. Watch a variety of forest visitors visit the feeders on a sunny day in this clip.

Three woodpecker species at New York feeder


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Three Woodpecker Species Visit Cornell Feeders At Same Time – May 15, 2020

Three species of woodpeckers line up in a row at the Cornell Feeders. Watch a Red-bellied Woodpecker arrive first at the middle suet feeder. A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker comes next, hitching to the seed block at the back left, and a Hairy Woodpecker arrives third, zipping onto the log-shaped feeder at the left of the frame. What differences do you notice between these three woodpeckers?

Baltimore oriole couple at New York feeder


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Male and Female Baltimore Orioles Visit Cornell FeederWatch Cam – May 5, 2020

A male and a female Baltimore Oriole stopped by the Cornell Lab FeederWatch cam, giving us a chance to examine their plumage differences. Adult males are flame-orange and black, with a solid-black head and one white bar on their black wings. Females and immature males are yellow-orange on the breast, grayish on the head and back, with two bold white wing bars.

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock’s Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists, hybridization is a dead end and both parent species will remain separate: here.

Birds feeding in snowy New York, USA


This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Forest Residents Flock To Cornell Feeders During Spring Snowfall – March 23, 2020

A bevy of colorful feeder birds flock to the Cornell Lab FeederWatch cam on a frosty spring morning in Sapsucker Woods. Who are you seeing at the feeders in your area?

Many birds at Cornell, USA feeders


This video from New York State in the USA says about itself:

Blackbirds Return To Cornell Feeders During Morning Feeding Frenzy – March 5, 2020

Red-winged Blackbirds, European Starlings, and Common Grackles join a host of forest residents in front of the Cornell FeederWatch cam. Many individuals of these species that breed in the northern latitudes of their ranges (including those in Ithaca, New York) tend to make short migrations south for winter. As spring approaches, they return to Sapsucker Woods and feast at the feeders in the Treman Bird Feeding garden.