Koreans commemorate crimes against ‘comfort women’


This Dutch language video says about itself (translated):

January 12 2017

Sometimes they were raped 20 times a day, 200 thousand Korean “comfort women” who were brought to Japan between 1910 and 1945 to sexually serve soldiers. This statue in Busan symbolizes the drama. But as [the governments of] South Korea and Japan want to bury the hatchet, the government threatens to dismantle the statue. Hans Aarsman about the protest which that decision causes.

Filipina ‘comfort women’ protest Japan’s Abe


This video says about itself:

Comfort Women Survivors Protest Against Japanese Prime Minister’s Visit

12 January 2017

Some surviving comfort women in the Philippines rallied on Thursday to protest against the Japanese prime minister’s visit to the country, asking for apology and compensation for the crimes the Japanese invaders committed against humanity during World War II.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Philippines: Comfort women lead protest against Abe

Friday 13th January 2017

PROTESTERS led by four World War II Filipino sex slaves gathered in front of the Japanese embassy in Manila yesterday against a state visit by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Left-wing umbrella group Bayan, which is among the organisations supporting the “comfort women,” said Mr Abe’s trip was not a mere “social visit.”

Comfort women and girls were forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army in occupied territories before and during the second world war.

Bayan said: “The visit of the Japanese PM is another step to slowly establish its military presence” through regular naval port calls and joint military exercises with US forces.

Japan wants to flex its military muscle in the region as a junior partner of the US. It has passed security legislation that goes against the spirit of its peace constitution.”

Korean Buddhist monk’s self-immolation in pro-‘comfort women’ protest


This video says about itself:

23 February 2016

South Korea and Japan signed a landmark deal in December 2015 to resolve the issue of the so-called “comfort women“, a euphemism for sex slaves used by the Japanese military. Student activists in South Korea have taken turns camping out on the streets of Seoul to protect the “comfort woman statue” in memory of the women. The students say they are afraid the statue will be removed as part of a deal to end a decades-long row over the so-called “comfort women”.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

South Korea: Monk sets himself on fire at rally for Park’s sacking

Monday 9th January 2017

SOUTH KOREA’S latest mass rally demanding President Park Geun Hye’s permanent removal from office was shocked at the weekend by the self-immolation of a Buddhist monk, who remains in a critical condition in hospital.

The monk, who suffered third-degree burns and serious damage to vital organs, made his dramatic protest against the government’s settlement with Japan on compensation for wartime sex slaves.

Police said that the man described Ms Park in his notebook as a “traitor” over the settlement. Under the agreement, Japan pledged to fund a Seoul-based foundation to help support the victims.

South Korea undertook not to criticise Japan over the issue and to address Japanese disquiet over a bronze statue representing sex slaves in front of its Seoul embassy.

Students have been holding sit-in protests next to the statue for over a year, suspecting that the government might try to remove it.

Tokyo recalled its ambassador on Friday after a similar statue appeared near its consulate in Busan.

Fukushima causing cancer, Japanese government admits


This video says about itself:

The Thyroid Cancer Hotspot Devastating Fukushima‘s Child Survivors

10 March 2014

Radiating the People: Worrying new claims say childhood cancer cluster has developed around Fukushima radiation zone

It’s what post-Fukushima Japan fears the most; cancer. Amid allegations of government secrecy, worrying new claims say a cancer cluster has developed around the radiation zone and that the victims are children.

In a private children’s hospital well away from the no-go zone, parents are holding on tight to their little sons and daughters hoping doctors won’t find what they’re looking for. Thyroid cancer. Tests commissioned by the local authorities have discerned an alarming spike here. Experts are reluctant to draw a definitive link with Fukushima, but they’re concerned.

“I care because I went to Chernobyl and I saw each child there, so I know the pain they went through”, says Dr Akira Sugenoya, a former thyroid surgeon. What terrifies parents most is a government they feel they can’t trust. It’s created a culture of fear; one which has led a number of women post-Fukushima to have abortions because they were worried about birth defects. “The doctors in Fukushima say that it shouldn’t be coming out so soon, so it can’t be related to the nuclear accident. But that’s very unscientific, and it’s not a reason we can accept”, Dr Sugenoya insists. “It was disclosed that the Fukushima health investigation committee was having several secret meetings. I feel the response has been unthinkable for a democratic nation”, Dr Minoru Kamata from the Japan Chernobyl Foundation says.

ABC Australia

From Japan Safety blog:

First thyroid cancer case in Japan recognized as Fukushima-related & compensated by govt — RT

January 8, 2017

A man who worked at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan during the disastrous 2011 meltdown has had his thyroid cancer recognized as work-related. The case prompted the government to finally determine its position on post-disaster compensation.

The unnamed man, said to be in his 40s, worked at several nuclear power plants between 1992 and 2012 as an employee of Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc. He was present at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant during the March 11, 2011 meltdown. Three years after the disaster, he was diagnosed with thyroid gland cancer, which the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare confirmed on Friday as stemming from exposure to radiation.

The man’s body radiation exposure was totaled at 150 millisieverts, almost 140 of which were a result of the accident. Although this is not the first time that health authorities have linked cancer to radiation exposure for workers at the Fukushima plant, it is the first time a patient with thyroid cancer has won the right to work-related compensation.

There have been two cases previously, both of them involving leukemia.

The recent case prompted Japan’s health and labor ministry to release for the first time its overall position on dealing with compensation issues for workers who were at the Fukushima plant at the time and after the accident. Workers who had been exposed to over 100 millisieverts and developed cancer five years or more after exposure were entitled to compensation, the ministry ruled this week. The dose level was not a strict standard but rather a yardstick, the officials added.

As of March, 174 people who worked at the plant had been exposed to over 100 millisieverts worth of radiation, according to a joint study by the UN and the Tokyo Electric Power Company. There is also an estimate that more than 2,000 workers have radiation doses exceeding 100 millisieverts just in their thyroid gland, Japanese newspaper the Asahi Shimbun reported.

The 2011 accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant was the worst of its kind since the infamous 1986 catastrophe in Chernobyl, Ukraine. After the Tohoku earthquake in eastern Japan and the subsequent tsunami, the cooling system of one of the reactors stopped working, causing a meltdown. Nearly half a million people were evacuated and a 20-kilometer exclusion zone was set up.

Japanese government angry about Korean ‘comfort women’ statue


Flowers atop a 'comfort woman' statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul, South Korea, July 22, 2015

From TIME magazine in the USA:

Japan Is Recalling Its South Korea Envoy Over a Statue Commemorating ‘Comfort Women

Kaori Kaneko and Tetsushi Kajimoto / Reuters

1:53 AM ET

Japan would also postpone bilateral “high-level” economic dialogue with South Korea

(TOKYO) — Japan said on Friday it was recalling its ambassador to South Korea over a statue commemorating Korean women forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two and that the statue violated an agreement to resolve the issue.

The two nations agreed in 2015 that the issue of “comfort women”, which has long plagued ties between the two Asian neighbors, would be “finally and irreversibly resolved” if all conditions of the accord — which included a Japanese apology and a fund to help the victims — were met.

The statue, which depicts a young, barefoot woman sitting in a chair, was erected near the Japanese consulate in the southern South Korean city of Busan at the end of last year.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden in a phone call that it was important for Japan and South Korea to carry out the agreement, and not constructive to go back on it.

Chief cabinet secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference that the statue was “extremely regrettable” and that Japan was temporarily recalling its ambassador.

He also said Japan would also postpone bilateral “high-level” economic dialogue and that Japan was suspending talks on a new currency swap arrangement with South Korea.

“Without building relations of trust, it won’t stabilise,” Finance Minister Taro Aso reporters, referring to the currency swap arrangement.

The term “comfort women” is a euphemism for girls and women, from South Korea, China, the Philippines and elsewhere, forced to work in wartime Japanese military brothels. South Korean activists estimate that there may have been as many as 200,000 Korean victims.

South Korea’s Finance Ministry on Friday expressed regret that talks on the currency swap agreement had been suspended due to political reasons.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has called on South Korea to remove a statue of a “comfort woman” which has reignited a diplomatic row over Tokyo’s wartime sex slavery: here.

South Korean ‘comfort women’ update


This video says about itself:

30 June 2014

A Sad and Beautiful Story about Comfort Women Sacrificed by Japanese Imperial Army during World War 2.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

South Korea: Opposition demands axing of deal on comfort women
Thursday 29th December 2016

OPPOSITION MPs in South Korea called yesterday for the scrapping of a deal with Japan concerning compensation for women forced into sex slavery.

The two countries agreed a year ago that Japan would pay £7 million to support 46 surviving “comfort women” — a euphemism for sex slaves taken by imperial Japan before and during World War II as its armies ravaged east Asia.

The parliamentary leader of the main opposition Democratic Party, Woo Sang Ho, said it would scrap the deal if the party wins presidential elections that could take place in a few months, pending the impeachment of corruption-tainted President Park Guen Hye.

And Kim Gyeong Rok, spokesman for the third-largest People’s Party, criticised Ms Park’s government for “selling away” the victims’ dignity and said the issue couldn’t be resolved without Japan offering a sincere apology and admitting legal responsibility.

Hundreds of protesters gathered round a statue of a girl symbolising South Korean sex slaves near Japan’s under-construction embassy in Seoul, calling for the agreement to be scrapped.

Under last year’s deal, South Korea agreed not to criticise Japan over the issue. Since WWII Japanese politicians have repeatedly downplayed its seriousness, only offering half-hearted apologies in 1993 and 2007.

An estimated 200,000 to 400,000 women were forced into sexual slavery by Japan, three quarters of whom died. Most of the rest were left infertile and severely traumatised by repeated rape and torture by Japanese soldiers.

China, whose citizens were also forced into sexual slavery, heavily criticised last year’s deal. Japan has yet to conclude similar deals with any other country.

Close US Okinawa military bases, demonstration


This video says about itself:

25 December 2016

Dozens protested U.S. military bases in Japan and called for the closure of U.S. bases in Okinawa. Demonstrators carried banners reading “Get Out! Marines“.