Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster update


This video says about itself:

Inside Fukushima’s Radioactive Ghost Towns

12 July 2016

A DAREDEVIL urban explorer has shared haunting images of the abandoned Fukushima earthquake ‘exclusion zone’ after sneaking in to the highly irradiated region. Wearing a gas mask but no other protective clothing, explorer and photographer Keow Wee Loong, 27, visited four of the evacuated towns in Fukushima – Tomioka, Okuma, Namie and Futaba – in June this year with friends Sherena Ng and Koji Hori.

Lying completely untouched since March 2011, the city of Fukushima was evacuated suddenly after the east coast of Japan was devastated by a massive earthquake followed by a huge tsunami. Keow’s images give an eerie insight into the panic that followed the disaster and show a city stuck in time as calendars remain on the same date, families’ clean washing is half-removed from driers and newspapers forever remain unsold.

Videographer / director: Keow Wee Loong
Producer: Crystal Chung, Ellie Winstanley
Editor: Jack Stevens

TOKYO — The combined costs of paying compensation for the Fukushima nuclear disaster and the decommissioning of the plant’s reactors may be double the initial estimate, rising to more than 20 trillion yen ($176 billion), according to estimates by the country’s industry ministry: here.

Why the water cooling system at Fukushima nuclear plant stopped — Business Insider Australia: here.

Japan tsunami highlights Fukushima nuclear plant vulnerability — Voice of America: here.

From the Asahi Shimbun daily in Japan:

Fukushima ‘ghost town’ uses dummies to fill sad post-3/11 void

By TAKUYA ISAYAMA/ Staff Writer

November 17, 2016 at 17:50 JST

NARAHA, Fukushima Prefecture–Ghosts of the past are all around in this Fukushima town whose communities were decimated in the aftermath of the 2011 nuclear disaster.

Less than one-tenth of Naraha’s residents have come home since its evacuation order was lifted, but some who did return have devised a creative solution to the population problem.

Locals have formed a group to make dummies to place them around the town in lieu of the many human inhabitants who have been absent since the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant disaster of March 2011.

The results are poignant.

KYOTO – The magnitude-7.4 aftershock that rocked Fukushima Prefecture and its vicinity last week, more than five years after the mega-quake and tsunami of March 2011, triggered fresh nuclear concerns in the Kansai region, which hosts Kansai Electric Power Co.’s Mihama plant in Fukui Prefecture: here.

Japan’s nuclear export ambitions hit wall as Vietnam set to rip up reactor order — Japan Today: here.

Tsunami off Fukushima, Japan


This video is called Fukushima BREAKING NEWS; NOV. 22 2016 Tsunami Warning issued at FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN.

From ABC in Australia today:

Japan earthquake: Tsunami after quake strikes off Fukushima

Updated 13 minutes ago

A major earthquake has struck off the coast of Fukushima in north-east Japan, triggering a tsunami as residents were urged to flee to higher ground.

Key points:

Earthquake was first recorded as magnitude-7.3, later downgraded to 6.9
The first waves have made landfall, bigger waves are expected to hit the coast
The region is the same that was devastated in 2011, triggering a nuclear crisis

Waves of up to 90 centimetres were recorded about an hour after the 6:00am (local time) earthquake, but public broadcaster NHK warned: “We are going to observe much higher tsunamis.”

Authorities also warned of a tidal rip-current in some areas, meaning a larger wave could be building out to sea.

The tsunami alert predicted waves up to three metres high following the quake, which had a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 but was later downgraded to 6.9 by the US Geological Survey.

The earthquake’s epicentre was at a depth of about 10 kilometres, off the coast of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which suffered a triple meltdown after the earthquake and tsunami which struck in 2011.

Tsunami waves have reached the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. The operator of the plant said there were no abnormalities observed at the plant, NHK said.

NHK urged people to evacuate immediately, reminding them of the 2011 disaster that killed about 18,000 people.

“Please remember the Great East Japan Earthquake and move to higher ground,” it said, also asking residents to help alert elderly relatives to the emergency.

People were urged not to return to their houses until all the warnings are lifted.

There were no immediate reports of damage.

One woman suffered cuts to her head from falling dishes, Kyodo news agency reported, citing fire department officials.

‘My windows were shaking’

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the Government would devote whatever resources were necessary to respond to the quake.

ABC correspondent Rachel Mealey said she felt the tremor in Tokyo, more than 200 kilometres away.

“I haven’t felt one like this is quite a long time. My apartment windows were shaking,” she said.

All nuclear plants on the coast threatened by the tsunami are shutdown in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Only two reactors are operating in Japan, both in the south-west of the country.

Even when in shutdown nuclear plants need cooling systems operating to keep spent fuel cool.

Tokyo Electric Power Co said there was no damage to the plants.

Earthquakes are common in Japan, one of the world’s most seismically active areas.

Japan accounts for about 20 per cent of the world’s earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.

The March 11, 2011, Fukushima quake was magnitude-9, the strongest quake in Japan on record. The massive tsunami it triggered caused the world’s worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl a quarter of a century earlier.

UPDATE: tsunami warning over; a few people injured.

Japanese neo-colonial soldiers in South Sudan may kill people


This 2016 video from South Korea is called Japanese colonial policy and its impact on modern Korea.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

A first: Japanese peacekeeping forces may shoot again

What ‘peace’ do these ‘peacekeeping’ forces keep? The peace of the grave?

Today, 11:59

A first for the Japanese forces in a new UN mission in South Sudan.

Like the armed forces of Britain (the former colonial power in South Sudan) are in South Sudan and elsewhere in Africa officially for humanitarianism, but in practice for oil, so are the armed forces of the right-wing Shinzo Abe regime in Japan.

The peacekeepers who today arrived in Juba may use force to help civilians or other UN soldiers in an attack.

Today arrived 63 of a total of 350 soldiers. On December 12, they will take over the work of another group of Japanese, who had a much more limited mandate.

At the end of the Second World War, Japan accepted a constitution that promised that the country would be pacifist. An army is not allowed, but the country has self-defense forces.

Since the 1990s the self-defense forces have also been deployed in peacekeeping missions. Then, always the rule was applied that Japanese could fight back only when they were attacked ….

Prime Minister Abe conducted last year a change in the law allowing Japanese troops more leeway abroad. …

Many Japanese have criticized the decision. They fear that pacifism will continue to lose in the country.

Upon the departure of the peacekeeping forces therefore there was a protest by a group of peace activists.

Japanese peace activists demonstrate against neo-colonial intervention in Sudan, AFP photo

Fukushima nuclear disaster, Japan, news update


This video says about itself:

25 August 2016

Five years after the twin catastrophes of the Japan tsunami and Fukushima nuclear meltdown, villages sit silent and empty. Thousands of workers still toil to clean up the radioactive material but it could be decades before their work is finished. As Japan continues to suffer the toxic aftermath of one of its worst ever disasters, 101 East reveals that the countryside may never again be safe.

Fukushima radiation in the Pacific (revisited) — Triple Pundit: here.

Fukushima cover up — CounterPunch: here.

Japan’s government should stay out of U.S. sailors’ lawsuit against TepcoThe Japan Times: here.

Editorial: Cost estimate needed first to decommission Fukushima plantThe Asahi Shimbun: here.

Untrained staff did radioactive cleanup work in FukushimaThe Asahi Shimbun: here.

Fukushima nuclear clean-up may rise to several billion dollars a year: government — Reuters: here.

Fukushima: A second Chernobyl? — The Asia-Pacific Journal: here.

Car wash septic tanks emerge as radiation threat in Fukushima — The Japan Times: here.

This petition was delivered to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. ”We strongly oppose the signing of the India-Japan Nuclear Cooperation Agreement (hereafter: ‘the Agreement’) during the Indian Prime Minister Mr. Modi’s upcoming visit to Japan, expected to be in mid November this year: here.

Nuclear disaster, Fukushima, Japan babies die


This video says about itself:

22 June 2015

Neonatal Mortality Rate

Infant death under 28 days of life per 1000 live Birth Annually / per year

Important causes:

1. Septicemia & Pneumonia (50%)

2. Birth Asphyxia (20%)

3. Prematurity (20%)

4. Congenital Malformations & Others (10%)

Neonatal Mortality Offen occurs in Low Birth Weight infants (2500gm)

NB: Asphyxia is defined as lack of oxygen in respired air = hypoxia = hypercapnia

By Hagen Heinrich Scherb, Dr rer nat Dipl-Math, Kuniyoshi Mori, MD, Keiji Hayashi, MD:

Increases in perinatal mortality in prefectures contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan

A spatially stratified longitudinal study

September 2016

Abstract

Descriptive observational studies showed upward jumps in secular European perinatal mortality trends after Chernobyl. The question arises whether the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident entailed similar phenomena in Japan. For 47 prefectures representing 15.2 million births from 2001 to 2014, the Japanese government provides monthly statistics on 69,171 cases of perinatal death of the fetus or the newborn after 22 weeks of pregnancy to 7 days after birth.

Employing change-point methodology for detecting alterations in longitudinal data, we analyzed time trends in perinatal mortality in the Japanese prefectures stratified by exposure to estimate and test potential increases in perinatal death proportions after Fukushima possibly associated with the earthquake, the tsunami, or the estimated radiation exposure.

Areas with moderate to high levels of radiation were compared with less exposed and unaffected areas, as were highly contaminated areas hit versus untroubled by the earthquake and the tsunami. Ten months after the earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent nuclear accident, perinatal mortality in 6 severely contaminated prefectures jumped up from January 2012 onward: jump odds ratio 1.156; 95% confidence interval (1.061, 1.259), P-value 0.0009. There were slight increases in areas with moderate levels of contamination and no increases in the rest of Japan.

In severely contaminated areas, the increases of perinatal mortality 10 months after Fukushima were essentially independent of the numbers of dead and missing due to the earthquake and the tsunami. Perinatal mortality in areas contaminated with radioactive substances started to increase 10 months after the nuclear accident relative to the prevailing and stable secular downward trend.

These results are consistent with findings in Europe after Chernobyl. Since observational studies as the one presented here may suggest but cannot prove causality because of unknown and uncontrolled factors or confounders, intensified research in various scientific disciplines is urgently needed to better qualify and quantify the association of natural and artificial environmental radiation with detrimental genetic health effects at the population level.

Ryuichi Yoneyama, a doctor-lawyer who has never previously held office, won the race for governor of Niigata on Sunday. He ran on the platform that he would not allow the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa power station, owned by Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO (9501.Japan), to restart operations: here.