Japanese government’s small compensation for forced prostitution survivors


This video says about itself:

South Korea: ‘Comfort women‘ foundation launched amid protests

28 July 2016

South Korean police have forcibly removed students protesting against the launch of a foundation for women used as sex slaves during the Second World War.

The centre’s been set up as part of an agreement to try to end years of anger over the so-called ‘comfort women.’

Al Jazeera’s Rob Matheson reports.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Comfort women get just £68,000 in compensation

Friday 26th August 2016

SOUTH KOREAN women who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese army in World War II will receive a mere £68,000 in compensation, announced Seoul’s Foreign Ministry yesterday.

The 46 living victims are eligible to receive some 100 million won from a foundation that the Japanese government has agreed to fund providing that Seoul refrains from criticising Japan over the issue.

The families of 199 deceased victims — abducted and sent to Imperial Japanese Army slave brothels to become “comfort women” — will get 20m won (£13,500).

The ministry said it expected Japan to transfer 1 billion yen (£7.5m) to the foundation set up last month.

The opening of the foundation’s office in Seoul was met by protests as many people in South Korea believe the government settled for far too little in talks between the two nations last December.

Japan has yet to grant compensation to North Korean or Chinese victims.

Japanese pro-nazi revisionist now ‘defence’ minister


Pictures from Japanese neo-Nazi Kazunari Yamada’s website show him posing with Shinzo Abe’s internal affairs minister, Sanae Takaichi, and his party’s then policy chief, Tomomi Inada

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Japan: Abe gives military brief to war crimes apologist

Thursday 4th August 2016

JAPANESE Prime Minister Shinzo Abe risked upsetting regional neighbours yesterday by naming as defence minister Tomomi Inada, who has excused her country’s war crimes.

Ms Inada, a former minister for regulatory reform who most recently held one of the top posts in the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, replaced Gen Nakatani as defence minister.

Mr Nakatani was notorious for pressing for Japan to have a pre-emptive strike capability.

The new defence minister is a regular at Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine, which honours war dead, including convicted war criminals.

Ms Inada has excused Japan’s wartime atrocities, including forcing many Asian women into sexual slavery in military-run brothels, and has headed a party committee to re-evaluate the judgement of Allied war tribunals.

Her link to a notorious anti-Korean group was acknowledged by a court this year in a defamation case she lost.

She was also seen posing with neonazi group leader Kazunari Yamada in a 2011 photo that surfaced in the media in 2014.

With ministers like Ms Inada, ‘defence minister’ sounds more than ever like an euphemism for war minister.

In the wake of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party’s (LDP) gains in last month’s upper house election, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reshuffled his cabinet on Wednesday in a move that presages further steps towards remilitarisation and pro-market restructuring. The most significant promotion was that of Tomomi Inada to the post of defence minister. Inada, a protégé of Abe, is well known for her extreme right-wing nationalist views. Although in parliament for just 11 years, she has already been mentioned as a possible future prime minister: here.

Emperor Akihito suggested he be allowed to abdicate and indirectly implied opposition to remilitarization and constitutional revision: here.

Japanese mass murderer of disabled people is neo-nazi


This video says about itself:

New Nationalism: Far-right voices get louder in Japan

10 January 2014

Some parts of Japanese society want to drag the pacifist nation to the right. Nationalist groups are growing louder in their calls for the country to take a harder line against enemies home and abroad.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Japanese murderer tied up hospital workers

Today, 12:42 …

More gruesome details have been published about the way the Japanese man who stabbed nineteen disabled people to death proceeded. Satoshi Uematsu first tied hospital workers so that he could proceed undisturbed. …

Hitler

The perpetrator had neo-Nazi sympathies. His last tweet pointed in that direction, says correspondent Kjeld Duits. He wrote: “Beautiful Japan”. That’s a code word for nationalists who want to return to pre-war Japan,” says German.

In February Uematsu pleaded in a letter to parliament for euthanasia for the disabled. He wrote that he wanted to “help” in that and named the name of the clinic.

After this he was himself admitted to an institution. There he is said to have said that he supports the ideology of Hitler. He thought eugenics was a good idea. That is genetic ‘improvement’ of human beings. Based on that idea the nazis have killed tens of thousands of disabled people in the Second World War.

Uematsu was in the psychiatric ward only for a short time. The doctors thought soon he was well again.

Red-crowned cranes in Japan


This 27 July 2016 video is called Trying To Save The Red Crowned Cranes Of Japan – Wild Japan – BBC.

Mass murder of Japanese disabled people


This video says about itself:

10 July 2011

“Go home now!” “You are cockroaches.” Stupid racist “Zaitokukai” shout to the Koreans living in Japan.

Zaitokukai – they’re a group of neo-nazis in Japan. They hate Chinese, Koreans and other foreigners. They always shout racist slogans. They are a group of ethnocentrists, and a group of the worst racial discrimination. Conscientious people in Japan fear that they may injure foreigners. We hope many people of the world will get to know know about the hidden crisis in Japan.

By Peter Symonds:

Knife attack in Japan leaves 19 disabled people dead

27 July 2016

A terrible attack in Japan by a disturbed individual on disabled people early Tuesday morning has left 19 people dead and a further 26 injured, half of them critically. Satoshi Uematsu, 26, broke into a centre for people with disabilities around 2 am, tied up the staff and then methodically stabbed the residents, before leaving and handing himself in to police.

The deadly attack has produced widespread shock in Japan where the homicide rate is low and multiple murders rare. No serious attempt, however, has been made in the Japanese or international media to probe any of the underlying social and political causes of the killing spree.

Uematsu was a former employee of the disabilities centre, known as Tsukui Yamayuri-en. He was forced to resign in February after he sent a letter to the speaker of the lower house of parliament advocating euthanasia for the disabled. According to the national broadcaster, NHK, he threatened to kill hundreds of people with disabilities “for the sake of Japan” and called for legislation to allow the lives of the severely disabled to be ended.

“I will carry out a massacre without harming staff,” Uematsu reportedly wrote. “I can kill 470 disabled people. My goal is a world where people with multiple disabilities who have extreme difficulty living at home or being active in society can be euthanised with the consent of their guardians.”

Uematsu made clear that Tsukui Yamayuri-en would be his first target, and that he would carry out the attack at night, when fewer staff were on duty.

After hearing about the letter, the welfare centre’s director told Uematsu that he was not an appropriate person to work at the facility and obtained his agreement to resign. The young man was involuntarily committed to a psychiatric hospital, where he was diagnosed with a marijuana-induced psychosis and delusional disorder, but allowed to leave just 12 days later.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe yesterday issued a perfunctory statement offering “condolences from the bottom of my heart” to the families of the victims and said his government would “do everything to get to the bottom of the truth.” Other politicians at the national and prefectural level followed suit.

While nothing suggests that yesterday’s attack was in any way connected to terrorism, the multiple murders will undoubtedly be used, as has been the case in recent incidents in France and Germany, to justify a further bolstering of the state apparatus in Japan.

Already, various commentators are calling for tough law-and-order measures. Nobuo Komiya, a Rissho University criminology professor, told Associated Press: “Japan has put an emphasis on not creating criminals, but it is reaching breaking point. Like in foreign countries, I think institutions need to develop a plan in operational management and prepare for a worst-case scenario, given that criminals are inevitably born.”

What Komiya is dismissing is the very notion that crimes, including murder, are the product of a diseased society rather than being innate to “evil individuals.”

A report on global homicide issued by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime in 2013 noted: “With no notable fluctuations, the homicide rate in Japan has decreased steadily since 1955 to reach one of the lowest levels in the world. The country’s homicide rate is associated with a stable and prosperous society with low inequality and high levels of development.”

In 2014, there were 11 times more homicides in the United States than in Japan, even though the American population is less than three times that of Japan.

Two decades of economic slump, however, combined with a deepening assault on living standards by successive governments have led to rising levels of social inequality, unemployment and poverty that are exacerbating social tensions. Young people in particular face an uncertain future as permanent jobs have been replaced by casual, low-paid employment.

According to the Yomuiri Shimbun, Uematsu obtained work as a part-time employee at the Tsukui Yamayuri-en centre in December 2012 after quitting a job with a transportation-related company. He became a full-time worker in April 2013. The New York Times reported that he told the police yesterday: “I held some grudges after being forced to resign.”

The Financial Times explained that “care facilities in Japan have come under growing strain as the number of elderly people has risen, creating the need for a large number of carers. Wages in the sector are low and a widespread shortage of trained carers and nurses had been blamed for a rise in incidents of elderly abuse.”

A study published in 2010 by researcher Yuuka Ooka into the working conditions of staff at welfare facilities for people with disabilities found that “62 percent of workers were in the condition of high-risk mental health.”

The study noted that government “reforms” had resulted in funding cutbacks, which resulted in increased workloads. “In recent years, problems in mental health among welfare staff have been increasing in every facility, resulting in their leaving or early retirement. It is clear that the reform efforts made the staff exhausted and sometimes sick. This trend in Japan has been a serious issue among facilities for people with disabilities.”

What drove Uematsu to murder disabled people remains unclear. He was clearly a deeply disturbed individual whose mental instability may well have been compounded by poor working conditions and the lack of assistance for staff members. There are some hints that he might have been attracted to extreme right-wing groups. The New York Times, for instance, noted that he had been following “several right-wing accounts” on Twitter.

The Abe government, in particular, has given succour to right-wing and fascistic organisations in Japan through its efforts to remilitarise Japan, integrate the country into US-led wars and promote virulent Japanese nationalism. This agenda only encourages a climate in which violence is seen as normal and that finds its most reactionary expression in the extreme right.

From British daily The Independent:

What makes Uematsu a psychopath is the utterly savage manner in which he acted on his contempt for the disabled, but behind his grotesque act of terror lies a sobering reality: we, the disabled, are oppressed, dehumanised and hated.

We are seen as a hindrance to society, sucking the life out of a dying economy, feeding off the struggling state. We are the lazy leeches who rob you, “the taxpayer”, of your hard-earned wages.

The UK is no exception.

Sika deer in Japan, video


This video says about itself:

[Sika] Deer Battle For Dominance – Wild Japan – BBC

24 July 2016

Deer in Japan fight over the females.

Bees, bears, honey in Japan


This video says about itself:

Honey-trapping Bears – Wild Japan – BBC

20 July 2016

This beekeeper has found a humane way of preventing bears from stealing honey, and with the help of local conservationists, relocate the bears to safer areas.