Sudanese dictatorship whitewashes mass murder


This 12 July 2019 video says about itself:

Sudan‘s Livestream Massacre – Documentary – BBC Africa Eye

On June 3, 2019, there was a massacre on the streets of Sudan’s capital, Khartoum. This is the story of that massacre, told through the phone cameras of those who kept filming, even as they came under live fire.

BBC Africa Eye has now analysed more than 300 videos shot in Khartoum on June 3rd. Using these videos, we can bring you a shocking, street-level view of the violence that was inflicted on protesters that morning – and the first direct testimony from men who say they took part in this attack.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Anger in Sudan about government report conclusions about mass slaughter

In the Sudanese capital Khartoum, hundreds of people took to the streets late last night. They protested against the results of a government investigation into the bloody crushing of a sit-in last month at the army headquarters.

Researchers who investigated the events on 3 June by order of the military regime say that 87 civilians died. According to the demonstrators, that number is far too low. They say there were 127 dead and they also disagree with the conclusion in the report that the perpetrators did not act on behalf of the government.

There have been demonstrations in Sudan for months. Why actually?

The protests were initially directed against President Bashir, who came to power in the early 1990s. An international arrest warrant has been running against Bashir for years because he is held responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Sudanese Darfur region.

Years ago, Western corporate media and corporate politicians used to call Sudan a dictatorship. However, ruling General al-Bashir came back into the NATO governments’ good books by helping the 2011 NATO war on Libya (which caused bloodbath after bloodbath with no end in sight, ruin of healthcare, sharp decline in women’s rights, rise of racism, torture of refugees and others, and the comeback of slavery 170 years after its abolition).

Al-Bashir continued to be in the self-styled Free World’s good books, by helping the European Union to stop refugees. And by helping United States President Trump and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed in their bloody war against the civilians of Yemen. As long as Bashir continued to do that, Bashir killing his own people in Darfur and elsewhere did not matter to the NATO countries’ political establishment.

The army deposed Bashir in April this year, in a relatively bloodless coup. Since then, the protesters have been asking the army that has taken over power to make way for a transitional government awaiting free elections. Despite an agreement concluded earlier this month, there is still no prospect. The conversations will continue. …

The results of the investigation committee come a few weeks after a prominent BBC program. In the documentary Sudan’s Livestream Massacre it can be seen that paramilitaries, by order of the military rulers, open fire on the protesters in Khartoum.

The documentary makers of BBC Africa Eye have analyzed over 300 videos of protesters, made when the outburst of violence was in full swing. These images have only rarely emerged, because the military council regularly blocks the internet. The paramilitaries with ties to the military council deny that they were behind the violence.

This 28 July 2019 video is called Sudanese protesters reject findings of June 3 probe.

See also here.

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6 thoughts on “Sudanese dictatorship whitewashes mass murder

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