Egyptian police kill Sudanese refugees

This video says about itself:

Police forces break up a demonstration against austerity measures in Sudan

7 July 2012

Hundreds of Sudanese protesters have been forced to abandon demonstrations against the President Omar al-Bashir and the government’s tough austerity measures, as police fired volleys of teargas at them in Khartoum.

After killing refugees in Turkey … after refugee killing in Bulgaria … after Egyptian police killed terrorists … whoops-a-daisy, tourists

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Police kill 15 trying to cross border into Israel

Monday 16th November 2015

EGYPTIAN police killed 15 Sudanese refugees trying to cross the border into Israel yesterday and wounded eight more.

Police opened fire on the migrants after they ignored warning shots and sprinted toward the border fence in the north of the Sinai Peninsula.

Most of the wounded were in serious condition after they suffered wounds to the chest and stomach.

The incident took place at a crossing about 12 miles south of Rafah on the border with the Israeli-occupied Gaza Strip.

It was also the deadliest incident involving Sudanese citizens since the 2005 clearance of a Cairo refugee camp.

There are more than 45,000 African refugees in Israel, including many from Sudan.

The government claims they are economic migrants whose growing numbers threaten the country’s Jewish character.

British government jails raped, tortured refugee woman

This video says about itself:

12 September 2015

Many tens of thousands of people marched through London, past 10 Downing Street and up to Parliament in solidarity with refugees. They demand Britain grants asylum to more refugees. Jeremy Corbyn joined and addressed the crowds. London2Calais report.

By Paddy McGuffin in Britain:

Raped. Tortured. And locked up in Britain

Friday 9th October 2015

Judge slams Theresa May for ‘truly disgraceful’ asylum regime

A SUDANESE woman who sought safety in Britain after being repeatedly raped and tortured only to be treated “truly disgracefully” by immigration officials won her legal bid in the High Court yesterday.

Mr Justice Collins condemned the “utterly unreasonable and truly disgraceful” treatment of the woman, known only as IKM, and allowed her to claim damages from the government.

The damning ruling comes just days after Home Secretary Theresa May’s rabidly xenophobic anti-immigration and asylum speech at the Conservative Party conference in Manchester.

In it, Ms May said the supposedly “wealthiest, fittest and strongest” people who claimed asylum having already reached Britain — like IKM and 97 per cent of those who seek refuge here — were less deserving than people stuck in refugee camps.

Justice Collins said there was clear medical evidence that IKM had been repeatedly raped and tortured in Sudan.

And she suffered further when she was locked up in an English immigration prison from December 7 2013 to January 2014, the court heard, and had to spend three weeks in hospital to recover.

Ordering damages to be assessed either by the High Court or a county court, the judge said: “Very properly the secretary of state has conceded her detention was unlawful.

“It is well known that she was someone who in all probability had sustained torture and that meant she was someone who should not be detained unless there were very exceptional circumstances. There were none.

“It is, I hope, a unique case because the behaviour of those responsible was utterly unreasonable and truly disgraceful.”

IKM, a non-Arab from Darfur, initially came to England to study but then decided to claim asylum in the Republic of Ireland, believing that she could not claim in England because she possessed a student visa.

Her asylum claim was rejected and her appeal dismissed in 2010.

She made her way back to England via Belfast to an area in north-east England where a local Sudanese community came to her aid.

However, the Home Office ordered that she be dumped in Dublin, pointing to the Dublin Convention asylum rules which state that the country where the claim was lodged bears the responsibility.

But the judge said that was rubbish — IKM’s story was solid and five doctors agreed she was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

“In circumstances such as these, it is difficult to see this as other than a cast-iron case for asylum in this country,” he said.

Ms May “should seriously consider whether it really is humanitarian to require” an unbending following of the rules “rather than adopting a compassionate approach in the particular circumstances of this case.”

David Mitchell, applying for permission to appeal on behalf of the Home Office, claimed the ruling “emasculated” the Dublin Convention.

But Justice Collins dismissed the claim, saying the government had the choice whether or not to stick strictly to it.

Ms May still has the option to go to the appeal court directly.

Saving Bulgarian, Sudanese birds from electrocution

This 2013 video says about itself:

Bulgaria‘s Nature

BSPB’s volunteer Alexander ‘Sancho’ Marinov (Bulgaria) and nature researcher Anneloes Tukker (The Netherlands) tell us about the wildlife diversity of Bulgaria.

From BirdLife:

Saving birds from electrocution: BirdLife Bulgarian Partner rewarded for its work on power lines

By Elodie Cantaloube, Wed, 28/01/2015 – 09:03

On 27 January, the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds (BSPB; BirdLife in Bulgaria) and the BirdLife Partnership were rewarded with the Renewables-Grid-Initiative (RGI) “Good Practice Award” in the environmental protection category.  The award, presented at RGI’s annual conference in Brussels, recompenses the NGOs’ work on preventing bird deaths due to electrocution and collision with power lines in Bulgaria and Sudan.

Svetoslav Spasov, Projects Director at the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds, accepting the award, stated: “I am delighted that in two particular cases we were able to secure the over-head power lines and prevent the death of many Eastern Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria and Egyptian Vultures in Sudan. There is still a lot to be done for a permanent solution; we need active cooperation and partnership between state authorities, private electric companies and [the] nature conservation community.”

Between 2009 and 2013, electrocution from power lines accounted for the death of 67% of tagged Eastern Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria. In Sudan, an infamous power line that runs from the Port Sudan area to the Red Sea coast is estimated to have electrocuted hundreds and perhaps thousands of Egyptian Vultures since its construction in the 1950s.

BSPB’s work started with investigating the threat to the eagles and vultures in Bulgaria, and then working with grid operators such as EVN to retrofit insulation materials to make the lines safe. It then became clear that these birds also faced similar threats at the other end of their migratory flyway. BirdLife’s UNDP/GEF Migratory Soaring Birds (MSB) project and its local NGO partner, the Sudanese Wildlife Society, decided to take action. Thanks to their efforts, in 2014, the Sudanese Company for Electricity Transmission finalized the decommissioning of the Port Sudan power line and has replaced it by a new fully insulated and bird-safe line.

Dr Ivan Scrase, Acting Head of Climate Change Policy from the RSPB (BirdLife in the UK) added: “This is great work, solving problems caused by mistakes in the past when there was less awareness of the risks power lines can cause for birds, and how to avoid them using good design and routing. As we build the infrastructure needed to deal with the huge threat climate change poses to the world’s wildlife, we must get it right first time”.

This “Good Practice Award” rewards outstanding practice in grid development, innovation and improvement to existing practices in the field – be it environmental protection, stakeholder participation or one of the many other fields surrounding grid development. Its main purpose is “to inspire future action and innovative thinking”.

Sudanese government bans International Women’s Day

This video says about itself:

Sudan woman whipped including in the face while police laugh–Warning Graphic images

14 Dec 2010

Amenesty International say Article 152 – moral codes relating to dress, allow women and even girls to be charged for wearing trousers.

From Al Jazeera:

Women’s day event denied permission in Sudan

It is unclear why permission was denied though March 8 event had been held without incident for the past eight years.

Last updated: 09 Mar 2014 15:02

Sudanese authorities have rejected permission for an International Women’s Day event in Khartoum, despite President Omar al-Bashir’s vow that freedoms should be respected.

The women in the capital were told on Sunday that they needed additional authorisation from a government commission handling voluntary activities but that was just a delaying tactic, said Fahima Hashim, director of the Salam Centre for women’s rights.

“We didn’t get the permission” from state security agents for Saturday’s planned event, she said.

The March 8 event – marked around the world when women are recognised for their achievements – had been held without incident for the past eight years at Khartoum’s Nubian Club, Hashim told AFP.

Hashim said it was unclear why approval was denied, but it might be connected with the larger size of this year’s event.

“We had more than 30 groups joining us,” she said.

The day-long event typically features exhibitions, forums, films and concludes with a party.

In January, al-Bashir appealed for a political and economic “renaissance”, including political freedom, in the country ravaged by armed insurrection and political turmoil.

Hashim said his renaissance was just “a lot of talk.”

COMMUNISTS from six countries issued a call at the weekend for a campaign of solidarity with the Sudanese Communist Party and the staff of its banned newspaper Al-Midan. Party representative Rashid Alsheikh told a meeting in London of parties from Britain, Iran, Greece, Cyprus and Bangladesh that all copies of the paper had been confiscated by the Sudanese regime’s security forces from the beginning of January: here.

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