Saving Bulgarian, Sudanese birds from electrocution


This 2013 video says about itself:

Bulgaria‘s Nature

BSPB’s volunteer Alexander ‘Sancho’ Marinov (Bulgaria) and nature researcher Anneloes Tukker (The Netherlands) tell us about the wildlife diversity of Bulgaria.

From BirdLife:

Saving birds from electrocution: BirdLife Bulgarian Partner rewarded for its work on power lines

By Elodie Cantaloube, Wed, 28/01/2015 – 09:03

On 27 January, the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds (BSPB; BirdLife in Bulgaria) and the BirdLife Partnership were rewarded with the Renewables-Grid-Initiative (RGI) “Good Practice Award” in the environmental protection category.  The award, presented at RGI’s annual conference in Brussels, recompenses the NGOs’ work on preventing bird deaths due to electrocution and collision with power lines in Bulgaria and Sudan.

Svetoslav Spasov, Projects Director at the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds, accepting the award, stated: “I am delighted that in two particular cases we were able to secure the over-head power lines and prevent the death of many Eastern Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria and Egyptian Vultures in Sudan. There is still a lot to be done for a permanent solution; we need active cooperation and partnership between state authorities, private electric companies and [the] nature conservation community.”

Between 2009 and 2013, electrocution from power lines accounted for the death of 67% of tagged Eastern Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria. In Sudan, an infamous power line that runs from the Port Sudan area to the Red Sea coast is estimated to have electrocuted hundreds and perhaps thousands of Egyptian Vultures since its construction in the 1950s.

BSPB’s work started with investigating the threat to the eagles and vultures in Bulgaria, and then working with grid operators such as EVN to retrofit insulation materials to make the lines safe. It then became clear that these birds also faced similar threats at the other end of their migratory flyway. BirdLife’s UNDP/GEF Migratory Soaring Birds (MSB) project and its local NGO partner, the Sudanese Wildlife Society, decided to take action. Thanks to their efforts, in 2014, the Sudanese Company for Electricity Transmission finalized the decommissioning of the Port Sudan power line and has replaced it by a new fully insulated and bird-safe line.

Dr Ivan Scrase, Acting Head of Climate Change Policy from the RSPB (BirdLife in the UK) added: “This is great work, solving problems caused by mistakes in the past when there was less awareness of the risks power lines can cause for birds, and how to avoid them using good design and routing. As we build the infrastructure needed to deal with the huge threat climate change poses to the world’s wildlife, we must get it right first time”.

This “Good Practice Award” rewards outstanding practice in grid development, innovation and improvement to existing practices in the field – be it environmental protection, stakeholder participation or one of the many other fields surrounding grid development. Its main purpose is “to inspire future action and innovative thinking”.

Sudanese government bans International Women’s Day


This video says about itself:

Sudan woman whipped including in the face while police laugh–Warning Graphic images

14 Dec 2010

Amenesty International say Article 152 – moral codes relating to dress, allow women and even girls to be charged for wearing trousers.

From Al Jazeera:

Women’s day event denied permission in Sudan

It is unclear why permission was denied though March 8 event had been held without incident for the past eight years.

Last updated: 09 Mar 2014 15:02

Sudanese authorities have rejected permission for an International Women’s Day event in Khartoum, despite President Omar al-Bashir’s vow that freedoms should be respected.

The women in the capital were told on Sunday that they needed additional authorisation from a government commission handling voluntary activities but that was just a delaying tactic, said Fahima Hashim, director of the Salam Centre for women’s rights.

“We didn’t get the permission” from state security agents for Saturday’s planned event, she said.

The March 8 event – marked around the world when women are recognised for their achievements – had been held without incident for the past eight years at Khartoum’s Nubian Club, Hashim told AFP.

Hashim said it was unclear why approval was denied, but it might be connected with the larger size of this year’s event.

“We had more than 30 groups joining us,” she said.

The day-long event typically features exhibitions, forums, films and concludes with a party.

In January, al-Bashir appealed for a political and economic “renaissance”, including political freedom, in the country ravaged by armed insurrection and political turmoil.

Hashim said his renaissance was just “a lot of talk.”

COMMUNISTS from six countries issued a call at the weekend for a campaign of solidarity with the Sudanese Communist Party and the staff of its banned newspaper Al-Midan. Party representative Rashid Alsheikh told a meeting in London of parties from Britain, Iran, Greece, Cyprus and Bangladesh that all copies of the paper had been confiscated by the Sudanese regime’s security forces from the beginning of January: here.

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African refugees protest in Israel


This video says about itself:

14 Oct 2012

Sudanese refugees protest in front of the government’s offices in center Tel Aviv, against the plan to imprison refugees, October 14, 2012.

Israel is building a new facility that could house thousands of additional asylum seekers in the Negev Desert.

From daily Haaretz in Israel:

African migrants take to the streets to demand Israel consider asylum requests

Human rights groups assert open detention center no different from jail. ‘I didn’t come for $3,500,” says one refugee about government exit grant.

By Ilan Lior | Dec. 22, 2013 | 12:20 PM

An estimated 1,000 Sudanese and Eritrean migrants, along with Israeli human rights activists, marched through the streets of Tel Aviv on Saturday night to urge the government to consider the asylum requests of migrants from Africa and release the approximately 3,000 held in Israeli custody.

“I looked into the eyes of the people here with me – everyone has had enough,” said Najmaldin, a Sudanese migrant who took part in the rally and did not want to give his last name. “People want their asylum requests looked into. If someone’s a refugee he should stay here; if someone’s not a refugee he should go back to Africa.”

“We demand a solution from the Israeli government for the people who are currently in prison and for us,” he said. “The people who are in Saharonim and in south Tel Aviv – it’s the same story, the same problems.”

Human rights groups say an estimated 3,000 of the 50,000 asylum seekers in Israel are locked up in the Saharonim detention center in the Negev. The government moved 480 of them to Holot, a nearby open detention facility, after the Knesset approved a legal amendment earlier this month authorizing the open center, where migrants are locked in only at night.

Though they are technically free to leave the premises during the day, they have to be present for roll call three times a day, a restriction meant to prevent them from finding jobs outside the facility. Last week hundreds of migrants marched out of the open center in protest, but were ultimately taken back into custody.

On Saturday, demonstrators marched from Levinsky Park in south Tel Aviv, where many migrants live, to Independence Hall on swanky Rothschild Boulevard. In an unplanned continuation of the protest, the demonstrators kept marching through Tel Aviv and blocked off some of the city’s roads, waving signs reading “Liberty” and “Not another jail.”

Human rights groups have said there is no real difference between the open detention center and a jail. Several of the groups have filed a High Court petition against the law that authorizes the Holot center, as well as allowing the state to hold migrants for up to a year without trial, down from three years.

Police detained two migrants for questioning Saturday on suspicion of attacking a police officer and disturbing the peace, and used pepper spray in an effort to disperse the rally.

Million, an Eritrean migrant who took part in the rally, said race was a major factor in the Israeli government’s treatment of the asylum seekers.

“The Israelis are white, the Africans are black,” he said. “The blood is the same blood. But the government of Israel, a democratic state, is not acting in a democratic manner and is putting the blacks in jail.”

Nazer said Israeli efforts to sway migrants like him to go back to Sudan or to neighboring Eritrea, by offering grants to those who leave the country, would not succeed. The cabinet recently agreed to more than double the amount offered, bringing the grant to $3,500.

“I didn’t come here for $3,500,” said Nazer. “I came here because I’m a refugee. The State of Israel wants to send us back to Sudan and Eritrea. How can we go back? There’s a war there.”

Sometimes it’s kind of scary how Israel treats asylum seekers. From jailing them with no trial to brutal arrests and now, referring to them as numbers. It’s as if they don’t think they’re human beings, with names: here.

Many refugees in Israel are from South Sudan; where there is horrible violence now.

Washington issues warning as South Sudan slides toward civil war: here.

Thousands of Africans, Israelis march in Tel Aviv to demand freedom for asylum seekers: here.

A penal colony for Africans in the heart of Israel: here.

Support Israeli actresses refusing to perform at West Bank settlement: here.