About petrel41

Blogging on animals, peace and war, science, social justice, women's issues, arts, and much more

Saudi Arabia, oppression, resistance and war

This video says about itself:

Inside Saudi Arabia: Butchery, Slavery & History of Revolt

3 October 2015

Meet the new head of the United Nations panel on Human Rights: the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Abby Martin takes us inside the brutal reality of this police-state monarchy, and tells the untold people’s history of resistance to it. With a major, catastrophic war in Yemen and looming high-profile executions of activists, The Empire Files exposes true nature of the U.S.-Saudi love affair.

Woolly mammoth discovery in Michigan, USA

This video from the USA says about itself:

Woolly mammoth skeleton unearthed by Michigan farmers

3 October 2015

Two farmers in Michigan made an astonishing discovery when they unearthed the remains of a woolly mammoth while digging in a soybean field.

Experts say it is one of the most complete sets ever found in the state.

University of Michigan researchers say there is evidence the mammoth lived 11,700-15,000 years ago.

Thirsty Indian leopard gets head stuck in pot

This video says about itself:

30 September 2015

A thirsty leopard found itself in a tight spot after he went foraging for water in an Indian mining dump.

The wild animal was found with its head stuck in a metal pot in the Indian village of Sardul Kheda in Rajasthan in the country’s north-west.

The agitated leopard wandered around as it struggled to get rid of the vessel, with onlookers recording and photographing the scene.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Forest officials eventually tranquilised the animal and sawed the pot off.

It was then taken to an enclosure a safe distance from the village.

District forest officer Kapil Chandrawal said: “It has been brought to a safe place.

“We have also called veterinarians to assess its health, which is in good condition. We have also tranquilised the animal.”

Mr Chandrawal said the leopard was around three and a half years old.

Disruption to wild habitats have led to increasing numbers of wild animals straying into inhabited areas in search of food.

According to the BBC, a recent wildlife estimate puts the leopard population of India at between 12,000 and 14,000.

‘Afghan patients burned in their beds in United States air force attack’, nurse tells

This 3 October 2015 video is called Nineteen dead, dozens missing in air strike on Kunduz hospital.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Afghanistan Kunduz hospital air strike: MSF nurse describes ‘patients burning in their beds’

MSF nurse Lajos Zoltan Jecs was in the hospital during the series of bombing raids – here’s what he saw

Lajos Zoltan Jecs

Sunday 4 October 2015 13:19 BST

Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) nurse Lajos Zoltan Jecs was in the charity’s Kunduz trauma hospital when the facility was struck by a series of aerial bombing raids in the early hours of Saturday morning. He describes his experience.

It was absolutely terrifying.

I was sleeping in our safe room in the hospital. At around 2am I was woken up by the sound of a big explosion nearby. At first I didn’t know what was going on. Over the past week we’d heard bombings and explosions before, but always further away. This one was different – close and loud.

At first there was confusion, and dust settling. As we were trying to work out what was happening, there was more bombing.

After 20 or 30 minutes, I heard someone calling my name. It was one of the Emergency Room nurses. He staggered in with massive trauma to his arm. He was covered in blood, with wounds all over his body.

At that point my brain just couldn’t understand what was happening. For a second I was just stood still, shocked.

He was calling for help. In the safe room, we have a limited supply of basic medical essentials, but there was no morphine to stop his pain. We did what we could.

I don’t know exactly how long, but it was maybe half an hour afterwards that they stopped bombing. I went out with the project coordinator to see what had happened.

What we saw was the hospital destroyed, burning. I don’t know what I felt – just shock again.

We went to look for survivors. A few had already made it to one of the safe rooms. One by one, people started appearing, wounded, including some of our colleagues and caretakers of patients.

We tried to take a look into one of the burning buildings. I cannot describe what was inside. There are no words for how terrible it was. In the Intensive Care Unit six patients were burning in their beds.

We looked for some staff that were supposed to be in the operating theatre. It was awful. A patient there on the operating table, dead, in the middle of the destruction. We couldn’t find our staff. Thankfully we later found that they had run out from the operating theatre and had found a safe place.

Just nearby, we had a look in the inpatient department. Luckily untouched by the bombing. We quickly checked that everyone was OK. And in a safe bunker next door, also everyone inside was OK.

And then back to the office. Full – patients, wounded, crying out, everywhere.

It was crazy. We had to organise a mass casualty plan in the office, seeing which doctors were alive and available to help. We did an urgent surgery for one of our doctors. Unfortunately he died there on the office table. We did our best, but it wasn’t enough.

The whole situation was very hard. We saw our colleagues dying. Our pharmacist – I was just talking to him last night and planning the stocks, and then he died there in our office.

The first moments were just chaos. Enough staff had survived, so we could help all the wounded with treatable wounds. But there were too many that we couldn’t help. Somehow, everything was very clear. We just treated the people that needed treatment, and didn’t make decisions – how could we make decisions in that sort of fear and chaos?

Some of my colleagues were in too much shock, crying and crying. I tried to encourage some of the staff to help, to give them something to concentrate on, to take their minds off the horror. But some were just too shocked to do anything. Seeing adult men, your friends, crying uncontrollably – that is not easy.

I have been working here since May, and I have seen a lot of heavy medical situations. But it is a totally different story when they are your colleagues, your friends.

These are people who had been working hard for months, non-stop for the past week. They had not gone home, they had not seen their families, they had just been working in the hospital to help people… and now they are dead. These people are friends, close friends. I have no words to express this. It is unspeakable.

The hospital, it has been my workplace and home for several months. Yes, it is just a building. But it is so much more than that. It is healthcare for Kunduz. Now it is gone.

What is in my heart since this morning is that this is completely unacceptable. How can this happen? What is the benefit of this? Destroying a hospital and so many lives, for nothing. I cannot find words for this.”

Afghan conflict: MSF demands Kunduz hospital inquiry: here.

Mammals and songbird swimming, video

Many animals are better swimmers than people believe.

In this video from the Netherlands we see, eg, a hare, a stoat, a red fox and a roe deer in the water.

And a jay, who had much more trouble.

Vlieland fungi and birds

This video is about Vlieland.

After 25 September, 26 September 2015 was our second day on Vlieland island. We did not only see Slauerhoff’s poetry then.

Early in the morning, a robin singing.

Curlew and redshank sounds from the Wadden Sea not far away.

In the afternoon, we went to the forested area north of the village.

Many fungi, including shaggy ink cap.

White saddle fungi, 26 September 2015

And these white saddle fungi. Like the other photos on this blog post, this is a macro lens photo.

Mycena species, 26 September 2015

And these fungi: about same colour, but different species, much smaller.

Great spotted woodpecker sound.

In the sand dunes close to the North Sea beach, big parasol mushrooms.

On the North sea jetties: herring gulls, ruddy turnstones, oystercatchers, a red knot.

European searocket flowers on the beach.

Common puffballs, 26 September 2015

Back to the forest. These common puffballs grew there.

Fungus, 26 September 2015

And this mushroom.

Bolete, 26 September 2015

And this young bolete.

Sulphur tufts, 26 September 2015

Finally, these young sulphur tufts.

Back in the village. A male chaffinch.