CIA torture update


This video says about itself:

Here the rain never finishes: exclusive CIA torture report from the ACLU | Guardian Docs

13 October 2015

Survivors of Central Intelligence Agency torture are sueing the contractor psychologists who designed one of the most infamous programs of the post-9/11 era. Salim, one of the three ex-detainees in the suit, is a Tanzanian fisherman who says that flashbacks from his ordeal in CIA custody are a permanent part of his life.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

US: Authorities allow torture and killing case against CIA

Friday 22nd April 2016

A CIVIL RIGHTS case against the CIA for the torture and killing of prisoners in a twisted experiment has received the tacit green light from authorities.

The Justice Department submitted a motion before todays’ hearing in a case brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, asking for classified information to be kept under wraps.

But the ACLU’s lawyers were encouraged that the department did not immediately invoke state secrets privilege to block the proceedings.

“The government is actually going to show up at the hearing instead of trying to shut it down,” said attorney Dror Ladin. “It’s going to be suggesting procedures that might allow the case to go forward.”

The government invoked those privileges in the case of Khaled El-Masri, a German citizen who unsuccessfully sued after he was beaten and sodomised while held at a CIA-run prison in Afghanistan known as the “Salt Pit.”

Today’s hearing stems from a ACLU lawsuit against two CIA-employed psychologists, James Mitchell and John “Bruce” Jessen, filed last October on behalf of three former prisoners of the agency.

The two devised an experimental CIA interrogations programme based on 1960s tests involving dogs and the theory of “learned helplessness.”

One of the victims, Gul Rahman, was interrogated at the Salt Pit and subjected to isolation, darkness and extreme cold water, and was later found dead from hypothermia.

The other two, Suleiman Abdullah Salim and Mohamed Ahmed Ben Soud, were held in CIA prisons but never charged. Both are now free.

Zubaydah’s later fate in the hands of the CIA was of a far grimmer nature. He had the dubious luck to be the subject of a number of CIA “firsts”: the first post-9/11 prisoner to be waterboarded; the first to be experimented on by psychologists working as CIA contractors; one of the first of the Agency’s “ghost prisoners” (detainees hidden from the world, including the International Committee of the Red Cross which, under the Geneva Conventions, must be allowed access to every prisoner of war); and one of the first prisoners to be cited in a memo written by Jay Bybee for the Bush administration on what the CIA could “legally” do to a detainee without supposedly violating U.S. federal laws against torture: here.

Ex-Abu Ghraib torture prison interrogator speaks


This video from the USA says about itself:

A Torturer’s Confession: Former Abu Ghraib Interrogator Speaks Out

7 April 2016

Eric Fair served as an interrogator in Iraq working as a military contractor for the private security firm CACI. He was stationed at the Abu Ghraib prison and in Fallujah in 2004. In a new memoir, Fair writes about feeling haunted by what he did, what he saw and what he heard in Iraq, from the beating of prisoners to witnessing the use of sleep deprivation, stress positions and isolation to break prisoners. The military described such actions as “enhanced interrogations,” but Eric Fair uses another word—torture. He writes, “If God is on anyone’s side in Iraq, it’s not mine.”

This video from the USA says about itself:

Former Abu Ghraib Interrogator: Because of Trump & Cruz, Door Still “Wide Open” for U.S. to Torture

7 April 2016

As Republican presidential candidates promise to bring back the torture techniques used under the George W. Bush administration, we speak with one of the men who actually carried out these policies. Eric Fair served as an interrogator in Iraq working as a military contractor for the private security firm CACI. He was stationed at the Abu Ghraib prison and in Fallujah in 2004. His new book, “Consequence: A Memoir,” has just been published.

This video from the USA says about itself:

7 April 2016

As a former interrogator in Iraq working as a military contractor for the private security firm CACI, Eric Fair was stationed at the Abu Ghraib prison and in Fallujah in 2004. While in Fallujah, he witnessed a torture device known as the Palestinian chair. He writes in his new book, “Consequence: A Memoir,” that the chair was a way to immobilize prisoners in order to break them down both physically and mentally. He also wrote that the Israeli military taught them how to use the Palestinian chair during a joint training exercise. For more, we’re joined by Eric Fair, whose new book, “Consequence: A Memoir,” has just been published.

Johan Cruyff: How Can You Play Soccer Next to a Torture Center?


JSC: Jamaicans in Solidarity with Cuba

Source:  TeleSUR
24 March 2016

cruyff 1Cruyff was the star of the Holland team of the 1970s which invented the style of “Total Football.” | Photo: AFP

Cruyff dazzled fans with this trickery and rejected Argentina’s brutal dictatorship in an unmatched soccer career.

Johan Cruyff, one of the greatest soccer players of his generation, and perhaps ever, missed the 1978 FIFA World Cup held in Argentina as he didn’t want to play close to the torture chambers the right-wing government had set up to house dissidents of the regime.

RELATED: Johan Cruyff Father of Modern Day Soccer Dies Aged 68

Dictatorship in Argentina

“How can you play soccer a thousand meters from a torture center?” he is quoted as saying before the tournament.

The South American nation was in turmoil at the time of the competition after a right-wing coup, led by General Jorge Rafael Videla, Admiral Emilio Eduardo Massera…

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Donald Trump and still more fanatical warmongers


This video from the USA sdays about itself:

Donald Trump Wants to Commit War Crimes and Neocons Still Think He’s Too Moderate

1 March 2016

Republican front-runner Donald Trump’s campaign has come under fire from high-level military officials, including former CIA Director Michael Hayden, who has said if Trump were elected president, it is possible U.S. military officials would refuse to follow his orders. Trump has pledged to reinstate forms of torture, including waterboarding, and other practices he said were “so much worse.” He has also repeatedly called for killing the family members of terrorists—a practice that violates the Geneva Conventions.

We speak with Zaid Jilani, staff reporter at The Intercept, who argues the pledges Trump made about torture are “flatly illegal,” but past presidents have also disobeyed and disavowed international law. His new article is “Neoconservatives Declare War on Donald Trump.” We also speak with Mychal Denzel Smith, Knobler fellow at The Nation Institute and a contributing writer for The Nation magazine.

George W Bush torture still covered up


This video from the USA says about itself:

What Is the Government Still Hiding? ACLU Continues Fight to Obtain Photos of Bush-Era Torture

18 February 2016

Earlier this month, the Pentagon released nearly 200 photographs relating to the abuse of prisoners by U.S. military personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan but refused to release a larger batch of 1,800 images. The American Civil Liberties Union has been fighting for nearly 12 years to win release of photos related to the Bush administration’s torture program. The released images include close-ups of bruised and lacerated body parts and bound, blindfolded prisoners. The withheld photos are believed to be far worse. We speak to ACLU attorney Alex Abdo.

Bahrain absolute monarchy news


This video from the European parliament says about itself:

Bahrain: the case of Mohammed Ramadan

4 February 2016

Alyn Smith MEP speaks on the institutional reform in Bahrain and raises the case of Mohamed Ramadan who is one of five people facing the death penalty in Bahrain.

From Index on Censorship:

10 Feb: Failure to reform: Five years of dissent in Bahrain

9 February 2016

On the 5th anniversary of the 2011 Bahrain uprising, reform has stalled and human rights abuses have continued to be systemic and widespread. With the region in turmoil and abuses on the rise, has the UK’s reform assistance achieved its stated objectives?

Bahrain’s UK-funded police watchdog fails to investigate torture claims. UK has given more than £2m to fund judicial reforms but there are concerns over alleged abuse of Mohammed Ramadan: here.

This video from the European parliament is called Marietje Schaake – Plenary speech on Bahrain, the case of Mohammed Ramadan (04-02-2016).

‘Sham reforms’: UK-funded watchdog in Bahrain fails to investigate torture allegations: here.

US Republican Trump advocates waterboarding and even worse torture


Donald Trump on torture

On top of this blog post is a quote about torture by Donald Trump, one of the United States Republican party presidential election candidates, during an election debate in New Hampshire yesterday.

Another Republican candidate, George W Bush’s little brother Jeb Bush, had already said that his older brother’s waterboarding torture was OK. In yesterday’s New Hampshire debate, candidate Ted Cruz agreed with that.

So did Donald Trump, like he had done before; adding in New Hampshire: “I would bring back a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding.” What exactly did Trump refer to? Under George W Bush, there was lots of torture, like sexual torture and rectal feeding, “a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding“. Did Trump refer to these forms of torture, as practiced by the CIA and others in Guantanamo Bay, Abu Ghraib and elsewhere? These forms of torture, along with torture in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, staunch allies of the Washington political establishment, became the main inspiration for torture by the ISIS terrorists.

Or does candidate Trump want to bring back even earlier times? The times of the 1692 Salem witch trials in what is now Massachusetts state in the USA?

Then, 81-year-old farmer Giles Corey, accused of witchcraft, was stripped naked; then, a heavy board was laid on top of him; then, the torturers put more and more heavy stones on his stomach and chest. Until Giles Corey died after two days of this torture.

Donald Trump’s son claims waterboarding ‘no different to what happens in college frat houses’. Like father like son: here.

Marco Rubio: I would tell rape victim ‘it’s a terrible situation’ but have the rapist’s baby anyway: here.