Genoa G8 police brutality victims compensated at last


This 2002 Associated Press video says about itself:

1. Wide shot pan of Genoa city and port
2. Various activists clapping to mark the moment of Carlo Giuliani’s death
3. Close up Carlo’s father, Giuliano Giuliani, shaking hands with people and clapping
4. Release of balloons
5. Photo of Carlo
6. Photo of police vehicle that ran over Carlo Giuliani
7. Flowers marking his death
8. Demonstration with poster
9. Shops barricades over the front
10. Deserted streets
11. Wide shot thousands on march
12. Ground shot of march
13. Top shot of marchers
14. Close up top shot of marchers with banners
15. Police outside McDonald’s
16. Demonstrators at front of march
17. Police at McDonald’s
18. Wide shot thousands of marchers, pullout
19. Banner and protestors
20. Sign with cross through riot police
21. Riot police heading towards marchers who wanted to go towards a prison
22. Wide shot standoff during demo
23. Police walking away
24. Top shot march

STORYLINE:

Tens of thousands of people held commemorations in Genoa, Italy, on Saturday for an anti-globalisation protester killed last year by police at the Group of Eight summit.

A 23-year-old protester, Carlo Giuliani, was shot dead …

Since his death, Giuliani has become a symbol for the movement, with activists condemning his death as an act of police brutality.

During Saturday’s commemoration in the square where Giuliani was killed, protesters let loose colored balloons printed with the words “Ciao Carlo” at the time of the shooting, 5:27 p.m. (1527 GMT). …

Crowd estimates varied with police saying about 60,000 people attended while organizers estimated it at 100,000.

The overwhelming majority of demonstrators held peaceful demonstrations.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

After 16 years compensation for demonstrators abused in Genoa

Today, 15:07

Six demonstrators who were injured in 2001 at the G8 summit in Genoa will each receive compensation of 45,000 euros from the Italian authorities. Italy admits that the police used excessive force.

The summit of eight major industrialized countries was marred by violent clashes between protesters and police in July 2001. In three days, hundreds of people were injured. One demonstrator was shot dead … .

Torture

Amnesty International spoke of the greatest violation of human rights in a Western country since World War II. Most criminal cases against the responsible police officers of the last few years led to acquittal, especially as torture is not a crime in Italy.

In a case before the European Court of Human Rights Italy and six protesters have now reached a settlement. The authorities will not only pay 45,000 euros per person, but also costs.

Code

In 2015, the European Court already awarded damages of 45,000 euros to an injured demonstrator. Also Italy was then commissioned to work on the inclusion of torture in the Criminal Code. However, that has still not happened.

Governments torturing refugees, new report


This video from Britain says about itself:

18 July 2016

Over 65 million people have fled their homes; please help by signing here.

Families are being ripped apart. The 6 richest countries which own half the world’s wealth host less than 9% of refugees. Wealthy governments need to welcome more refugees and provide more support so they are safe.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Oxfam: refugees mistreated at European Union borders

Today, 06:25

Refugees attempting to travel to northern Europe via the Balkans are often faced with violence and intimidation by authorities. Oxfam charity organisation says in a report (.pdf) that policemen, border guards and other officials in the Balkans regularly cross red lines and wrongly send migrants back or treat them unlawfully.

Oxfam bases itself on interviews with 140 refugees who came to Europe in 2015 and 2016. They expose, according to the aid organization “a disturbing pattern” of abuse of power and violence. According to aid agencies border guards do everything to get people back across the borders.

In the report a man from Afghanistan says that he was put into a cage in Bulgaria and did not get any food for three days. “And I was not the only one treated cruelly. They beat us and even did electric shocks,” said Issaq.

Hungarian border guards are said to have snatched valuables from migrants. They were then deported. “Our cell phones were destroyed, they took our money away“, said Afghan Malik. “We were beaten and then driven back to the border.”

Hypothermia

Other examples mentioned in the report were in Serbia, Croatia and Macedonia. Eg, a group of migrants in Serbia was told that they would be taken to a refugee center. Instead, the group was dumped along the border with Bulgaria in the freezing cold. By the time they were found, two of them had become hypothermic and unconscious.

Also, several migrants tell that policemen used air conditioning of cars to scare them off. Nabil from Afghanistan says he deliberately had to sit in the cold, though he had ended up in the water in an attempt to reach Croatia. “After the police had caught us, we were locked into a car with air conditioning. It was really cold.”

Oxfam says that some things are extra bad as Bulgaria, Hungary and Croatia are European Union countries. “The EU should be a bastion for human rights, but by accepting such conditions, they really support violent behaviour“, says Oxfam.

British government help for Bahraini torturers


This video says about itself:

22 November 2015

Bahraini security forces are torturing detainees during interrogation. Institutions set up after 2011 to receive and investigate complaints lack independence and transparency.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Britain covered up extent of intelligence training

Monday 6th February 2017

BRITISH authorities were accused yesterday of covering up the provision of intelligence training to Bahraini police on how to gather information about protesters.

The government’s intelligence project was put in place after protesters in the Gulf kingdom were rounded up and sentenced to death, international human rights charity Reprieve claims.

Bahraini police officers were allegedly paid by the Foreign Office to visit Belfast in August 2015 so that the Police Service of Northern Ireland could teach them how to gather intelligence ahead of demonstrations.

Protesters in Bahrain, such as Mohammed Ramadan, have been targeted by police and tortured into falsely confessing to capital crimes.

Mr Ramadan, a father of three young children, is now on death row and could be executed at any time.

The training, which also included sessions on the use of water cannon, dog handling and public order tactics, was kept secret.

The government has repeatedly denied providing public order training to Bahrain’s security forces.

A statement from the Cabinet Office said: “The UK does not fund any programmes in Bahrain focused on public order.”

However, documents obtained by Reprieve show that Bahrain’s police received an “introduction to combined operational training with a focus on public order.”

The training was prepared by Northern Ireland police officers during a week-long “scoping” visit to Bahrain in April-May 2015, during which they assessed Bahrain’s public order set-up, Reprieve said.

Reprieve death penalty team director Maya Foa said: “It is outrageous that the government has covered up this project, which risks supporting the execution of protesters in Bahrain.

“Bahrain is notorious for arresting, torturing and sentencing to death people involved in protests.

“By training Bahrain’s police how to gather intelligence on protesters, there is a serious risk that Britain is helping them arrest and execute people who are guilty of nothing more than calling for reform.

“It is scandalous that the government has sought to sweep this under the carpet.”

German army torture scandal


This 2011 video is about torture in the German navy and army.

If we read about how German soldiers treat their fellow soldiers, then we can only have extremely big concerns about how German soldiers will treat African civilians during the German government’s neocolonial wars in Mali and elsewhere

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

‘Sadistic hazing for German recruits’

Today, 13:38

Soldiers of the German army base Pfullendorf have been found guilty of mistreatment and humiliation of recruits, weekly magazine Der Spiegel writes.

Pfullendorf is an ‘elite unit’ according to Der Spiegel.

There are said to be sadistic hazing rituals in the training for medics.

The magazine describes degrading practices at the barracks. Eg, newcomers would have to undress during training and recordings were made of that. Victims also had to insert tampons anally. That was filmed as well.

Also, soldiers would be tied up for hours naked on chairs while being sprayed with garden hoses. According to Der Spiegel, the Bundeswehr expects that investigation will find out still further abuses.

There were already in 2015 stories about misconduct in the medic training. Investigation, however, then did not discover anything. In October last year a female soldier approached the minister directly with new accusations. …

There is currently an investigation whether the commanding officers knew of the practices.

CIA torture, new information


This video says about itself:

Here the rain never finishes: exclusive CIA torture report from the ACLU

13 October 2015

Survivors of Central Intelligence Agency torture are sueing the contractor psychologists who designed one of the most infamous programs of the post-9/11 era. Salim, one of the three ex-detainees in the suit, is a Tanzanian fisherman who says that flashbacks from his ordeal in CIA custody are a permanent part of his life.

By Shelley Connor in the USA:

Declassified reports reveal torture techniques used by Bush-era CIA

21 January 2017

Newly disclosed documents from the CIA detail the “enhanced interrogation” techniques—torture—used on detainees at black sites throughout the world. The documents, 50 in all, include information that was not presented to the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into the CIA torture program in 2014.

This information has been released amid a pitched legal battle concerning the handling of the full 6,700 page document that was presented to the Senate Intelligence Committee.

The documents were released as the result of an American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Freedom of Information Act suit against the CIA. The documents describe, in clinical, disinterested prose, a harrowing array of torture techniques used against suspects, from extreme humiliation to potentially deadly force.

The use of “mock burials,” in which detainees were forced into coffin-shaped boxes with hidden ventilation holes, the slamming of detainees repeatedly into walls, and the exposure of denuded detainees to extreme cold stand out as particularly inhumane practices. The documents include an investigation into the 2002 death of suspected Taliban militant Gul Rahman, who died of hypothermia at a black site north of Kabul, Afghanistan. At the time of his death, Rahman was clad in nothing but an adult diaper, and had been chained to a vent in his cell throughout a cold, November night.

Attorneys for two of the CIA’s victims, Abu Zubaydah and Abdul Rahim Al-Nashiri, are currently fighting for the preservation of the full report of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s findings, which doubtless contain even more gruesome details.

Judge Emmet G. Sullivan, who is adjudicating Zubaydah’s habeas corpus request, issued a memo demanding that the United States government “immediately” deposit a complete and un-redacted copy of the Senate report with the court by February 10. Last week, Judge Royce C. Lamberth of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia ordered the Obama administration to hand a copy over to the court, as well, in the case of Al-Nashiri. The Obama administration resisted on both counts.

Excerpts from the reports reveal how prisoners were subjected to torture through “walling” and waterboarding. During walling, a towel rolled up and placed behind the prisoner’s neck was the only precaution taken to ensure that the victims did not sustain concussions or spinal injuries when yanked upright by their chains and slammed into walls by their interrogators. Zubaydah was rendered unconscious and suffered seizures as a result of this treatment; to this day, he still experiences blackouts, headaches and seizures.

After three consecutive days of waterboarding, walling, and mock burials, Zubaydah was given a day-long reprieve from the aggressive interrogations. He was given Ensure, a meal replacement drink, and was again released to his cell, where interrogators disrupted his sleep purposely throughout the night. The next morning, interrogators again hooded Zubaydah and inflicted their torments upon him anew. After telling interrogators that he had no new information to offer, he was slapped and forced into a dark, upright box with a container for his waste.

Even after Zubaydah “showed distress,” he was left in the box for four hours. He was removed from this box, was walled again for two hours, and was then shoved into what interrogators called “the small confinement box.” Here, he was forced into a modified fetal position, with his back curved downward and his legs drawn up.

“Subject remained in the small box for one hour and ten minutes. Subject sounded distressed and did not appear to adapt as well to his time in the small confinement box,” interrogators recounted. He was waterboarded and walled for several more hours after being removed from the box. “Subject has not provided any new threat or elaborated on any old threat information. Medical assessment is that subject remains stable and that his physiologic condition is close to normal given his present circumstances,” the report affirmed.

Zubaydah himself remembers those events in much more excruciating detail. He told his lawyers that he remembered “screaming unconsciously,” in pain because he was unable to stretch his legs, unbend his back, or stand upright. The documentation of his torture reveals that the small box was used to the maximum amount allowable by interrogators.

The reports substantiate claims by several detainees that interrogators drugged them with powerful pharmaceuticals without consent during interrogation—a practice regarded as unethical by medical professionals. For years, the CIA asserted that detainees were only “sedated” as a last resort, mainly as a safety measure.

However, the released documents reveal another practice entirely. In April of 2002, interrogators documented plans to transport Zubaydah “in a state of pharmaceutical unconsciousness … to maximize the intended effect of disorienting.”

These documents have been released at a critical juncture. Obama ascended to the presidency eight years ago amid hopes that he would end the opacity and latitude the intelligence apparatus had enjoyed under Bush. Yet during his last week in office, he worked feverishly to ensure that the full, damning report of state-sanctioned torture would remain safely sealed in the presidential archives, where they would be free from public viewing until 2028. In response to Judge Royce Lamberth’s order to remand a copy to the court, Obama administration lawyers argued that doing so would endanger executive-congressional cooperation and that the document enjoyed enough protection by being included in Obama’s archives.

This action is of a piece with the rest of Obama’s presidency, which began with him granting immunity to war criminals from the Bush and Cheney era. Obama’s lukewarm expressions of distaste for torture are not borne out by his policies, through which domestic spying, extrajudicial assassinations and legalized entrapment have become standard operating procedure.

While Al-Nashiri fights for his freedom—and his life, as the Obama administration has sought the death penalty—James Mitchell, a primary architect of many Bush-era torture regimens, remains free.

Another criminal who walks free, CIA director John Brennan, worked to intimidate members of the Senate Intelligence Committee. He ordered CIA thugs to break into Senate staffers’ computers and delete information concerning the CIA’s torture program. He then brazenly claimed that those staffers should be prosecuted for possessing confidential information, and arrogantly stated that the CIA had a right to withhold information from the Senate Intelligence Committee, to which it is supposed to be answerable.

Obama doused the flames between Brennan and outraged members of the Senate committee by stating that no one would be prosecuted. This effectively granted Brennan immunity and provided a precedent for the cover-up of war crimes.

Meanwhile, whistleblowers such as Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowden, and CIA analyst John Kiriakou were punished for the “crime” of revealing the sadistic nature of military and intelligence practices. Kiriakou, particularly, stands out as a symbol for the injustice of the Obama administration; while James Mitchell boasts openly to the press about waterboarding detainees, Kiriakou was prosecuted by the Obama Justice Department and sentenced to 30 months in prison for revealing the use of waterboarding to the American public.

Many Americans are rightly concerned about the dangers posed by recently inaugurated President Donald Trump. Attorneys for victims such as Zubaydah and al-Nashiri, among others, fear that Trump could, at the behest of Senate Republicans, destroy the full Senate torture report. Trump himself has expressed support for waterboarding and other techniques; “Torture works,” he has told reporters.

The Central Intelligence Agency announced February 2 that its new deputy director will be Gina Haspel, a 32-year CIA veteran who ran one of the first secret prisons where Al Qaeda suspects were subjected to torture in the period following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the US: here.