Shark fin soup stopped at Thailand school

This video says about itself:

23 March 2012

Shark finning is a practice used around the world where fishers capture sharks, and remove and sell their fins. Not only is it cruel, it’s hurting all marine life. Humane Society International is working hard to stop shark finning everywhere.

From the Bangkok Post in Thailand:

Shark fin soup removed from menu (Updated)

19 Nov 2015 at 11:55


Montfort College School in Chiang Mai has removed shark fin soup from the menu to be served at the school’s annual party next month at the request of a parent and after the issue was raised by a green advocate.

Friday update
Montfort removes shark’s fin soup from menu

Montfort College has informed us that it responded quickly to the parent’s concerns over serving a dish containing shark fin at next month’s annual reunion party. College officials say they thanked her for her concern and her valuable suggestion and tooks steps to remove the dish on October 26. The story became news after plans to include the dish was publicised by a prominent environmental activist.

Thursday story

Apinya Wipatayotin

Montfort College School in Chiang Mai should remove shark fin soup from the menu to be served at the school’s annual party next month, says a green advocate.

The president of the Lanna Bird and Nature Conservation Club, Rungsrit Kanjanavanit, says he backs the concerns of a school parent who wrote to him saying she was disappointed in the decision to include shark fin on the menu, as it encourages animal cruelty.

The mother said the school was preparing to offer shark fin with crab meat and scallops in red soup, to be served at 260 tables during the annual reunion dinner on Dec 22-23.

Dr Rungsrit, also an environmental activist, said shark fin soup is no longer fashionable. Many airlines and hotels refuse to include the traditional Chinese delicacy on their menus.

The school should remove it from its menu as a good example to society, he said.

Dr Rungsrit said the complainant is the mother of three children at the school. She told him in the letter the school should avoid encouraging cruelty against the shark population.

She said sharks are not food for human beings and their fins have no extra nutrition compared to other kinds of food.

“I don’t want to see the school’s party as part of a vicious circle that kills sharks and destroys the marine ecological system,” she said.

Dr Rungsrit said the mother also wrote to the school to pass on her concerns. Its executives had replied thanking her for her concerns and said they would consider the matter. No word was given on whether other parents have complained.

Eagle news from Australia

This video from Thailand is called White-bellied sea eagle hunting @ Elephant Hills Rainforest Camp.

From Birdline Victoria in Australia:

Sat 14 November 2015

White-bellied Sea-eagle

An adult sea eagle observed being harassed by ravens over Cardinia Reservoir at lunch today.

Big yellow-browed warbler migration on Texel island

This video says about itself:

Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus)

Also known as Inornate Warbler. Filmed at Doi Ang Khang, Thailand, on 4th March 2013.

For information about the status and distribution of this species see the BirdLife International fact-sheet.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands:

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Last week at least a hundred were seen on Texel, in the dunes, in Oosterend, in Den Hoorn and Den Burg: yellow-browed warbler! This small songbird is spotted every year on the island during the fall migration, but never as many as this year, says Adriaan Dijksen of the Vogelwerkgroep Texel.

Thailand dictatorship banned Orwell’s 1984, now New York Times

King of Thailand in Bangkok hospital on 1 September 2015, while employees kneel for him, photo by EPA

After censorship, self-censorship …

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Thai edition of New York Times not published because of article about royal family

Today, 11:42

The publisher of The International New York Times in Thailand did not print today’s edition, because there was an article in it about the future of the Thai royal family. “The article is too sensitive to publish,” said the printer. In Thailand there are strict rules for public discussion about the royal family.

The article discussed the deteriorating health of the 87-year-old King Bhumibol and uncertainty about the survival of the monarchy. It says that the crown prince is known as a playboy and that it will be a chore for him to equal the prestige and status of his father. The newspaper writes that many Thai hope that the daughter of the king, who is much more popular among the population, will succeed the king, but that the law forbids women on the throne.

Lese majeste

Thai subscribers received an email from the newspaper stating that it was the decision of the local publisher to not let the newspaper appear today. “The decision is not supported by The New York Times,” the email says, and readers are refered to the online version of the newspaper.

Overt criticism of the royal family or the monarchy in Thailand can lead to imprisonment up to 15 years for treason. The number of convictions has increased considerably since a military junta in May last year has taken power in Thailand. According to human rights organizations this is part of a larger campaign to silence critics.

Thailand royal insult case: Second suspect dies in as many weeks. Suriyan Sucharitpolwong was admitted to hosital and Thursday and died of natural causes on Saturday, said the Department of Corrections: here.

Thirty years jail for insulting king of Thailand

This June 2014 video is called Thailand dictator watch.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

30 years in jail for insulting Thai king

Today, 12:36

In Thailand, a man has been convicted to thirty years in prison for lèse majesté. He insulted on Facebook among others King Bhumibol.

There are stiff penalties in Thailand for insulting the king, queen, heirs or regents. For each offense a person can receive a maximum sentence of fifteen years.


The court in Bangkok ruled that the 48-year-old Pongsak Sriboonpeng in six cases was guilty of insulting the monarchy. For each charge, he was sentenced to ten years, but because he pleaded guilty, his sentence was halved.

“This breaks a record,” said his lawyer. Because in Thailand there is a state of siege Sriboonpeng can not appeal against the verdict of the military court.


Since the military coup in May 2014 in the country, the number of convictions for lèse majesté has increased considerably. Before the coup took place there were two court cases, now there are at least 56, according to a local human rights organization.

In April, was a businessman was convicteed to 25 years in prison for insulting the monarchy. This week a man with mental problems was sentenced to five years in prison, because he had damaged a portrait of the king and the queen.

Critics think the draconic punishments are for silencing opponents of the monarchy and the military regime.

Thai military dictatorship jails students

This video is called Thailand, 9/11/14: Brutal and barbaric abuses by the Royal Thai Army, a testimony by a human rights lawyer.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Thailand: UN calls on junta to free 14 arrested student protesters

Wednesday 1st July 2015

THE UN human rights office called on Thailand yesterday to release 14 student activists arrested for holding a demonstration.

The university students were detained on Friday on charges of sedition and violating the military government’s ban on political gatherings for holding the rally in Bangkok the previous day.

The military, which seized power last May when it overthrew a civilian government, has banned political gatherings of five people or more and ordered security-related offences to be handled by military courts.

The students were issued with arrest warrants for having conducted rallies in the capital and in the north-eastern province of Khon Kaen last month to mark the first anniversary of the coup.

Each student faces a maximum sentence of seven years in prison.