Hill blue-flycatcher in Thailand


This video says about itself:

Male Hill Blue-flycatcher (Cyornis banyumas) at the Ang Khang Royal Agricultural Station, Thailand, on 22nd March 2017. Filmed with a Nikon CoolPix P900.

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Monkeys using tools to open shells


This video, recorded in Thailand, says about itself:

Monkeys Use Tools to Open Shells | BBC Earth

3 June 2018

Macaques have learnt to use the sea low tide and rocks to their advantage in order to have a seafood banquet.

Thai people demonstrate against military dictatorship


Thai demonstrators against military dictatorship, Reuters photo

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

In Bangkok hundreds of people have taken to the streets to protest against the military regime in Thailand. They took action at the regional headquarters of the United Nations. The estimated 900 demonstrators want the regime to stop what they believe is intimidation of activists.

The demonstration is one of the biggest against the government in months. It is organized by the People’s Movement for a Just Society, a network that stands up for people who have lost their land because the government has expropriated it.

Fear

Protests against the junta are relatively special in Thailand because Thai people did not dare to demonstrate in recent years.

“Two years ago no one would have taken to the streets to demonstrate against it, but now the irritation about the junta has won the fear”, says correspondent Michel Maas. “These are not the first and certainly not the last demonstrations that will be held there.”

Coup

The army seized power in Thailand in 2014 and thus put an end to a protracted period of protests. The junta promised that free elections would be held, but they have been postponed several times, to the displeasure of the population. The elections are now scheduled for next year.

Maas thinks that the Thai protest movement will become bigger in the coming period.

Thai dictatorship jails blind woman for Facebook share


This video says about itself:

4 January 2018

Blind Thai woman is jailed for 18 months for sharing a ‘royal insult‘ on Facebook. A blind woman was jailed for 18 months by a Thai court on Thursday for sharing a Facebook post deemed defamatory to the royal family, her lawyer said, the latest victim of a tough law that shields the monarchy from criticism.

Nuhurhayati Masoe, 23, who hails from Thailand‘s Muslim-majority Yala province, was punished for publishing an excerpt from an article on the social media platform in October 2016. She heard the article through an audio application for blind people.

Translated from Dutch RTL news today:

Blind Thai woman jailed in prison cell for sharing a Facebook post

A court in Bangkok sentenced a young blind woman to a one-and-a-half-year prison sentence because she had shared a critical post about the monarchy on Facebook.

The lèse majesté laws are particularly harsh in Thailand. Violators can be sentenced to years of imprisonment.

The military in power

The 23-year-old woman had shared an article by royal family critic Giles Ungpakorn.

The woman has confessed that, but she did not expect that only sharing would cause such a severe punishment.

Since the military have been in power through a coup in 2014, more than a hundred people have received long penalties for lèse majesté.

Imprisonment in Thailand for ‘insulting’ 400-year-dead king?


This video from Thailand says about itself:

Sulak Sivaraksa on lèse majesté, nationalistic history, coup, and succession

6 November 2014

The self-proclaimed royalist Sulak Sivaraksa has faced at least three lèse majesté charges. The latest one filed against him at the age of 82 was brought by two retired generals who were not satisfied with Sulak’s speech on King Naresuan, a monarch who ruled Ayutthaya Kingdom about 400 years ago.

Prachatai’s Thaweeporn Kummetha interviewed Sulak Sivaraksa, a renowned royalist and lèse majesté critic at his home in Bangkok.

In Thailand, there is draconian lèse majesté punishment for ‘insulting’ a living king or other royal. There is draconian lèse majesté punishment for ‘insulting’ a living king’s dog.

Now, things in Thailand are getting ‘curioser and curioser‘ as Alice used to say in Wonderland.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

One is not allowed to offend a king who died 400 years ago in Thailand

Today, 12:52

An 85-year-old Thai man may go to a prison cell for insulting a king who reigned 400 years ago. He appeared before the military court in Bangkok today and is accused of lèse majesté.

Sulak Sivaraksa three years ago in a speech at a university asked a question about what happened in 1593. He wondered if the story is true that at that time the Thai king Naresuan killed the Burmese crown prince in a personal duel on an elephant. This ‘battle of Nong Sarai’ is still commemorated every year.

Sulak, who has often expressed criticism about the rulers in Thailand, does not understand why he is still prosecuted for statements he made in 2014. “Maybe they do not like me because I never keep my mouth shut. I speak the truth. I have to be critical. That’s my job.”

People accused of lèse majesté in Thailand may be imprisoned between 3 and 15 years. There is nothing in the law about insulting dead kings, but according to Sivaraksa’s lawyer, it is just how someone interprets the law.

According to a human rights organization, since the army did a coup in Thailand in 2014, 138 people have been accused of lèse majesté.

What next? Will Theresa May in Britain now jail people for saying 16th century King of England Henry VIII had some of his wives beheaded (which is true), because Ms May wants ‘Henry VIII powers’ for herself?

Theresa May as Henry VIII

This picture shows how Theresa May might look if she was Henry VIII, which she isn’t.

This 2015 French video, with English subtitles, asks itself whether French author Charles Perrault based his Bluebeard tale on King Henry VIII.

Five people accused by Thailand’s military junta of hoarding military weapons were charged on Thursday. The charges are a thinly veiled attempt to suppress political opposition and potentially to create a pretext for delaying or calling off elections promised for next year: here.