Buzzard and thorny skates’ eggs


This 2016 video shows buzzards feeding in Belarus.

On 10 January 2020, a buzzard on a branch in the forest.

Great spotted woodpecker.

Two Egyptian geese land at a meadow where four others are present already. They are welcomed, or are they shown they are unwelcome?

On the beach, sanderlings.

Also at least five egg cases of thorny skates.

Texel goldcrests, sanderlings and geese


This video says about itself:

Hyperactive SANDERLINGS on the beach at the Cap-Pele wharf in southeastern New Brunswick, Canada on November 5, 2011.

On 9 January 2021, a walk through the forest and sand dunes of Texel island to the North Sea.

On a meadow, gray lag geese, white-fronted geese and Egyptian geese.

In the forest, goldcrests. And a blue tit hanging upside down on a branch.

On the beach, herring gulls and sanderlings.

Goldcrests on Texel island


This is a goldcrest video from Sweden.

Today, at Den Helder ferry harbour, two jackdaws sitting on top of a sign, a bit distant from each other. The sign warned people to distance spatially.

In the forest west of Den Burg village on Texel island, a great spotted woodpecker calls.

A flock of goldcrests.

Pleistocene frozen wolf pup discovery in Canada


This 22 December 2020 video from Canada is called What scientists have learned about mummified wolf pup from the ice age.

From the BBC, 22 December 2020:

A wolf cub that was found mummified in northern Canada lived at least 56,000 years ago, scientists say.

Hidden in permafrost for tens of thousands of years, the female cub was discovered by a gold miner near Dawson city in Yukon territory in 2016.

She has since been named Zhur, meaning wolf, by the local Tr’ondek Hwech’in people.

Scientists now say the cub, of which the hide, hair and teeth are intact, is “the most complete wolf mummy known”.

“She’s basically 100% intact – all that’s missing are her eyes,” lead author Professor Julie Meachen, a paleontologist and professor of anatomy at Des Moines University in Iowa, told the EurekAlert! science news website.

Using a variety of techniques, the team was able to determine many aspects of the cub’s life, from her age and diet to a probable cause of death.

The findings, published in the Current Biology journal on Monday, show the cub and her mother had eaten “aquatic resources”, including fish such as salmon.

Triassic marine reptile Atopodentatus


This 22 December 2020 video says about itself

The Triassic Reptile With “Two Faces”

Figuring out what this creature’s face actually looked like would take paleontologists years. But understanding this weird animal can help us shine a light on at least one way for ecosystems to bounce back from even the worst mass extinction.