‘Scientology covered up sexual abuse’


This video from the USA says about itself:

3 March 2017

Los Angeles police are probing allegations of sexual assault against That ’70s Show actor Danny Masterson, authorities told The Hollywood Reporter Friday. There is also a report of a possible cover up by the Church of Scientology.

From The Independent in Britain today:

Church of Scientology allegedly covered up abuse claims filed against That ’70s Show TV star Danny Masterson

The incidents were said to have occurred in the early 2000s

Jacob Stolworthy

Actor Danny Masterson, who appeared in sitcom That ’70s Show, is reportedly being investigated by the LAPD after allegations that accusations of sexual assault were covered up by the Church of Scientology.

Variety has reported that the LAPD is looking into claims of sexual assault that were said to have been committed by Masterson – a practicing Scientologist – in the early 2000s. Masterson has denied the claims.

A statement from the LAPD reads: “Three women have come forward and disclosed that they were sexually assaulted by Masterson during the early 2000s.”

The claims that the Church of Scientology covered up the allegations against the actor come courtesy of journalist Tony Ortega.

Masterson’s representative told Variety that the “false allegations appear to be motivated to boost Leah Remini’s anti-Scientology television series [Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath].“ …

Masterson appeared in That ’70s Show alongside Ashton Kutcher with whom he currently stars in Netflix comedy The Ranch.

81 WOMEN ACCUSE FORMER USA GYMNASTICS DOCTOR OF SEXUAL ABUSE USA Gymnastics president Steve Penny resigned on Thursday afternoon in response. [HuffPost]

NATO’s ‘new’ Libya, world’s worst child abuse


This 30 October 2011 video is called Jean Bricmont: The 3 victims of the lie of the humanitarian war in Libya.

From the BBC today:

Libya exposed as an epicentre for migrant child abuse

By Paul Adams, BBC News

The United Nations has warned that large numbers of children are still risking their lives to make the dangerous journey from Libya to Italy.

Unicef says almost 26,000 children – most of them unaccompanied – crossed the Mediterranean last year.

In its new report, Unicef says many children suffer from violence and sexual abuse at the hands of smugglers and traffickers.

But they rarely report their abuse, for fear of arrest and deportation.

The agency also says there is a lack of food, water and medical care in Libya’s detention centres.

The plight of children, many of them unaccompanied by parents, has become a tragically familiar part of the wider story of mass migration over the past two years.

But while much has been said about the extreme dangers faced at sea, the privations experienced on land, especially in Libya, are less familiar.

Unicef’s latest report, A Deadly Journey for Children, documents – in sometimes horrific detail – stories of slavery, violence and sexual abuse experienced by huge numbers of vulnerable children making their perilous way to Italy.

“What really shocked Unicef staff and me… is what happens to them [children] on this route,” says Justin Forsyth, the organisation’s deputy executive director. “Many of these children have been brutalised, raped, killed on this route.”

Girls such as nine-year-old Kamis, who set off with her mother from their home in Nigeria. After a desert crossing in which a man died, followed by a dramatic rescue at sea, they found themselves held at a detention centre in the Libyan town of Sabratha.

I was in Sabratha when that torture jail was still not there, only the ancient Roman theatre and other archaeological buildings; before NATO’s ‘humanitarian’ war on Libya. I cry.

“They used to beat us every day,” Kamis told the researchers. “There was no water there either. That place was very sad. There’s nothing there.”

Much of the violence is gratuitous, and much of it is sexual.

“Nearly half the women and children interviewed had experienced sexual abuse during migration,” the report says. “Often multiple times and in multiple locations.”

Borders, it seems, are particularly dangerous.

“Sexual violence was widespread and systemic at crossings and checkpoints,” says the report.

Many of the assailants are in uniform. This is said to be just one reason why those who suffer abuse are reluctant to report their experiences.

And Libya, as the funnel through which so many journeys pass, has earned itself a shocking reputation as the epicentre of abuse.

“Approximately one third [of those interviewed] indicated they had been abused in Libya,” the report says. “A large majority of these children did not answer when asked who had abused them.”

So commonplace are stories of rape and sexual enslavement that some women embarking on the journey take precautions, such as getting contraceptive injections and carrying emergency protection with them.

The report maps 34 known detention centres in Libya, three of them deep in the country’s desert interior.

Most are run by the government’s

Which government? There are several governments in Libya fighting each other.

Department for Combating Illegal Migration. But Unicef says that armed groups also hold migrants in an unknown number of unofficial camps.

“The detention centres run by militias, we’re much more worried about,” says Mr Forsyth. “That’s where a lot of abuse is happening and we have very, very limited access.”

In 2016, more than 180,000 migrants crossed from Libya to Italy. According to the UN, almost 26,000 of these were children, most of them unaccompanied. The number of unaccompanied children appears to be soaring.

“It’s a combination of factors,” says Mr Forsyth. “The situation in places like Eritrea and northern Nigeria is very bad. Also in the Gambia recently.”

‘I wanted to cross the sea’

Politics aside, poverty and the promise of a better life remain key drivers.

“I wanted to cross the sea,” 14-year-old Issaa told researchers. “Look for work, work hard to earn a bit of money to help my five brothers at home.”

But two and a half years after leaving home in Niger, Issaa was found living alone in a Libyan detention centre.

“My father collected money for my journey, he wished me luck and then let me go.”

The migrants are, of course, heavily dependent on smugglers to get them through the desert and across the sea.

A recent case when dozens bodies were found washed up on the shore near the western city Zawiya shows that this remains extremely hazardous.

But smuggling is all-too often associated with human trafficking. Victims accept migration packages from criminal gangs, only to find themselves forced into prostitution to repay their debts.

“Libya is a major transit hub for women being trafficked to Europe for sex,” the report says.

Libya’s continuing political turmoil makes it extraordinarily difficult to tackle a phenomenon, which the report says has spiralled out of control.

But Unicef is urging Libya, its neighbours and regional organisations to do more to protect children.

A regional initiative, it says, would include improved birth registration, the prevention of trafficking, safe and legal pathways for children fleeing armed conflict and, where appropriate, family reunification.

“Whether they’re migrants or refugees, let’s treat them like children,” says Mr Forsyth. “It’s a reflection of our humanity, our values, how we respond to this crisis.”

Stop EDL nazis abusing our grief, child abuse survivors say


This video from Britain is called EDL Nazi Salute Compilation.

By Peter Lazenby in Britain:

Rotherham‘s victims say: ‘EDL racist rallies are not in our name’

Monday 27th February 2017

VICTIMS of child sex abuse in Rotherham have made an impassioned plea to Home Secretary Amber Rudd to stop the fascist English Defence League (EDL) exploiting their suffering to justify hatred.

The EDL staged another police-protected “national” demonstration in South Yorkshire at the weekend but fewer than 40 EDL extremists turned up in the town.

They were outnumbered by at least four times as many counter-protesters drawn from Rotherham’s multicultural population.

Anti-fascism demonstrator Martin Hickman said: “From what I saw EDL had fewer than 40 people.

“It’s clear every time it comes its numbers get smaller. It’s also worth remembering it calls these national mobilisations.”

Rotherham has been targeted by the EDL, National Front and British National Party in more than 20 demonstrations over the last two years.

The groups refer to the 1,400 girls who were revealed to have been “groomed” for sexual abuse and exploitation by older men that were mainly of Asian origin.

Police and Rotherham Council were criticised for inaction long after the perpetrators had been jailed.

But the far-right groups continue to use it to create division and racial hatred by targeting the town for protests.

The victims and their relatives wrote an open letter to Ms Rudd asking her to stop the marches.

The letter states: “You will be aware that as children we were failed and ignored … If you remember there were 1,400 of us — that’s without taking account of our parents and families.

“Here we are having to be reminded of our abuse over and over again — not by the police or council — but by the number of marches in this town, all in our name.

“What right does anyone have to use our horrendous memories of our abuse to cause hatred and fear in our town?

“We are asking you to put something in place to stop these marches … We live with what happened to us as children constantly.

“This is our town, our abuse, and more importantly for a lot of us, the place where we are bringing our own children up. “Rotherham should not be defined by our abuse but defined by our strength and courage.

“Please help to stop this, let us move forward and be proud of our town and help it mend — we have had enough.”

United States far-rightist Yiannopoulos advocates paedophilia


This video from the USA says about itself:

6 April 2016

Watch Milo Yiannopoulos defend adults having sex with 14 year olds, 30 year olds being attracted to 15 year olds, as well as not giving up the names of Hollywood child abusers he met during parties.

From Pink News in Britain:

Yiannopoulos denies ‘defending paedophilia’ as shocking tapes emerge

20th February 2017, 12:24 PM

Far-right figurehead Milo Yiannopoulos is under fire after clips emerged of him allegedly defending men who have sex with underage boys.

Yiannopoulos has built a large following as a Donald Trump supporter, and is set to speak alongside senior Republicans at the upcoming CPAC [Conservative Political Action Conference] conference – which will be attended by Vice President Mike Pence, Trump advisor Steve Bannon, White House chief Reince Priebus and Senator Ted Cruz, among others.

The far-right figure and internet troll is already deeply controversial, previously claiming he would ‘cure’ himself of being gay if he coulddescribing trans people as “mentally ill gay men dressing up for attention”, and using a university lecture to single out and bully a transgender student on-stage.

Top conservatives are now facing questions about their ties to Yiannopoulos, however, after clips surfaced in which he appeared to defend sex with underage boys.

In one video reported by Uproxx, taken from an old livestream interview with the internet figure, Yiannopoulos attacks the age of consent as an “arbitrary one-size-fits-all policing of culture”.

He adds: “In the homosexual world, particularly, some of those relationships between younger boys and older men — the sort of ‘coming of age’ relationship — those relationships in which those older men help those young boys discover who they are and give them security and safety and provide them with love and a reliable, sort of rock, where they can’t speak to their parents.”

He is also heard bragging about his sexual activity under the age of consent, defending a priest who he had sex with.

When others present protest that his comments “sound like child molestation”, Yiannopoulos insisted: “I’m grateful for Father Michael, I wouldn’t give such good head if it wasn’t for him.”

Pushed on whether he was defending child molestation, he said: “You’re misunderstanding what paedophilia means. Paedophilia is not a sexual attraction to somebody 13 years old who is sexually mature, paedophilia is attraction to children who have not reached puberty, who don’t have functioning sex organs yet, who are too young to be able to understand the way their bodies work. That is not what we’re talking about.”

The comments have reverberated around the political sphere, with CNN’s Jake Tapper taking to Twitter to question the plans for Yiannopoulos to speak at CPAC in light of the revelations..

He wrote: “This guy is speaking at CPAC??????

“Friend of mine, conservative, could not be more distraught by this Milo tape. Was molested as a child. Horrified.

“How on earth can CPAC defend this? Preying on children is the definition of evil. Justifying it in any way is sick and disturbing.”

Yiannopoulos responded in a Facebook post titled ‘A note for idiots’, having been previously banned from Twitter for allegedly encouraging racist abuse.

CPAC Blasted for Milo Yiannopoulos Invite After Pedophilia Remarks Resurface: here.

“The Milo Test,” wrote Charlie Sykes, a conservative former radio host who has written critically of the Republican Party since the rise of Trump. “Anti-Semitism, ok. Racism, ok. Alt Right, ok. Advocacy of pedophilia? Is THAT the bridge too far?”. Here.

SO IT WAS DEFENDING PEDOPHILIA THAT LOST MILO YIANNOPOULOS HIS BOOK DEAL AND CPAC APPEARANCE Videos emerged of Yiannopoulos appearing to condone sexual relationships between adults and 13-year-old boys. [HuffPost]

‘7% of Australian Catholic priests are child abusers’


This video says about itself:

6 February 2017

Seven percent of priests in Australia’s Catholic Church were accused of sexually abusing children between 1950-2010. Journalist Karen Middleton brings more details.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Seven percent of priests in Australia is said to have committed sexual abuse of children between 1950 and 2015. It was already known that child abuse within the Roman Catholic Church occurred in Australia, but not on what scale.

A study by the Australian government further states that the age of the victims was an average of 10 years for girls and for boys 11 years.

The inquiry has the numbers only of documented cases. It involves allegations of sexual abuse. It is assumed that several allegations have been covered up.

Between 1980 and 2015, 4444 Australians reported sexual abuse. The reports came from across the country. In some regions, more than 40 percent of the priests have been accused of child abuse.

Child abuse in United States military families


This video from the USA says about itself:

Reports: U.S. Military Overlooked Rape of Boys

22 September 2015

Brooke Baldwin speaks with father whose son was killed in Afghanistan. Allegations are surfacing marines were told to tolerate abuse by Afghan military.

By Shelley Connor in the USA:

Child abuse and neglect soar in US military families

9 January 2017

A recent investigation by the Los Angeles Times/Tribune has uncovered a significant increase in child abuse and neglect among US military families since 2003.

Using Freedom of Information Act requests, the Times gained access to reports from the Army, Navy and Air Force that reveal that, in many cases, military officials failed to act upon known or suspected cases of child abuse in military families.

The reports confirm that child fatalities in military homes jumped from 14 in 2003 to 38 in 2012; from 2012 to 2014, they remained above 30 per year until they dropped to 23 in 2015—the last year that Pentagon records are available. That same year, the Family Advocacy Program (FAP), a military program aimed at intervening in cases of domestic violence and child neglect, reported 5,378 cases of child abuse and neglect in military families.

For years, the Pentagon has maintained that child abuse is less common and less severe in military homes than it is among the civilian population. It asserts that its vigilance in weeding out drug and alcohol users screens out most abusive parents—moreover, service members, the Pentagon says, are free from the stress of unemployment faced by most civilians, which decreases the financial strain upon military families.

Most proudly, the Pentagon points to its Family Advocacy Program (FAP) and the obligation of base commanders to monitor the welfare of their troops’ families and to order the FAP to intervene in cases where service members are suspected or known to have abused their family members.

Despite the Pentagon’s boasts, however, the rate of child abuse and neglect in the military has risen from 4.8 incidents per 1,000 children to 7.2 within five years. This rise, demonstrated by the Pentagon’s own records, has occurred even as the number of enlisted personnel has declined by 10 percent in recent years.

Moreover, FAP personnel point out that these are only the cases to which its caseworkers are alerted. The Times report quotes Rene Robichaux, who oversees the Army’s clinical child abuse treatment program, who said, “We get about 25 percent of the incidents. The rest occur behind closed doors.”

The FAP was founded in the years following the Vietnam War, when there was a spike in spousal abuse cases amongst returning military personnel. Previous efforts by the military to intervene in domestic abuse cases amongst its members had been poorly funded and unenthusiastically maintained.

FAPs predecessor, the Child Advocacy Program, was established in 1976 to address mounting incidents of child abuse in military homes. In 1979, after multiple reports demonstrated that military service members were responsible for 15 percent of the nation’s total spousal abuse cases, the program was expanded to include spouses and renamed the Family Advocacy Program. The program has a budget of around $2 million a year, and is brandished by the Department of Defense both as a benefit to military recruits and as a shield against the public outcry against the military’s treatment of enlistees and their families.

Child abuse and neglect are known to correlate strongly with deployment. Despite this, base commanders have failed to report cases of abuse to the FAP. Child welfare advocates have pointed out that there is reluctance among commanders to address cases of abuse and neglect, because they can lead to a service member’s discharge. Not only that, these reports can be seen as evidence of a commander’s incompetence to monitor his or her troops.

Several recent high-profile child murder cases have also shown that FAP referrals alone are inadequate to address concerns over child maltreatment in military families.

In the case of 22-month-old Tamryn Klapheke, who died of starvation on Dyess Air Force Base, the FAP had previously intervened, along with Texas’ Child Protective Services, after the infant’s malnourished state was reported by doctors. Tamryn’s father was serving overseas at the time. Tamryn’s mother, Tiffany Klapheke, cooperated with FAP’s requirements, making all of Tamryn’s assigned doctors’ visits and completing a parenting course.

Three months after a social worker had noted in Tamryn’s file that fatality was likely if she were not fed appropriately, the family was released from the program’s oversight. Autopsy reports demonstrate that Tiffany Klapheke had provided neither food nor water for Tamryn for at least four days before she died.

All branches of the military have increased staffing for the FAP in recent years. Nevertheless, the program is overwhelmed, particularly when units return from deployment. A service member might wait for three weeks or more to speak with an FAP therapist after being referred to the program. Moreover, the cases that are referred tend to be extreme, demanding immediate attention. There is an incentive for caseworkers and their managers to quickly move families through the program in order to work through the caseload.

In some cases, parents never come into contact with an FAP caseworker, even when there are multiple, well-documented reports of abuse.

Such was the case of Talia Williams, a five-year-old girl living on Wheeler Air Force Base, who died after being beaten by her father and stepmother in July of 2005. Mrs. Williams had been reported by coworkers numerous times for remarking that beating children was acceptable as long as there were no incriminating marks. Her father did not take such precautions; the staff at Talia’s daycare notified military police after finding bruises on Talia’s arms and back. Talia had told them that her father beat her with a paddle when he was angry.

The FAP agent assigned to Talia’s case never took action; Naeem Williams was sentenced to life in prison for his daughter’s murder. In 2008, Talia’s mother sued the Army for negligence and wrongful death in federal court. The Justice Department attempted to block the suit, arguing that the Army was not responsible for child abuse on its bases. U.S. District Judge Alan C. Kay rejected the government’s motion to dismiss. Last year, the Justice Department settled with Tarshia Williams for $2 million—the amount of the FAP’s yearly budget—in the case of her daughter’s death.

The United States has been at war continuously for more than 15 years. Decreases in enlistment have meant that enlistees face multiple deployments. The stress placed on these service members and their families is well-documented.

Children of service members suffer from anxiety at a higher rate than their civilian cohort. Behavioral problems, distractibility, and cognitive impairment among the children of deployed troops reveals the tremendous strain that their parents’ deployments places upon their young shoulders. When their parents return, readjustment to civilian life is fraught with peril. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent among these service members; added to that is the economic uncertainty to which they return.

It is wholly unsurprising that child abuse and neglect are increasing in these families. In fact, the military’s own research, conducted since the late 1970’s, confirms that this is not a novel, undocumented phenomenon. The evidence accrued steadily throughout the 1980’s that spousal abuse was much more prevalent in the homes of service members who had been deployed, and child abuse, it is well-known, is much more likely in families where there is spousal abuse.

The military’s use of the FAP as a fig leaf to hide behind is therefore obviously disingenuous, as is the Pentagon’s insistence that military families are well-cared for economically.

Many service members, lured to war by the dangling of recruitment bonuses, are now being forced by the Pentagon to repay those bonuses, despite serving multiple overseas tours and incurring significant psychological and financial strain.

The unnecessary deaths of Talia Williams and Tamryn Klapheke testify to the fact that the United States’ endless wars are claiming victims on American soil; moreover, they expose the indifference of the military to the scourge of child abuse amongst its ranks, when addressing it would endanger the steady stream of soldiers to fight and die for the interests of American imperialism.

Dutch cartoonist Peter van Straaten dies


Child abuse, cartoon by Peter van Straaten

This 2011 cartoon is by Peter van Straaten from the Netherlands. It is about sexual child abuse in the Roman Catholic church. It depicts a praying child, abused by a crucifix.

Peter van Straaten died this week, 81 years old.

Van Straaten said about some of the reactions to that cartoon:

I got a huge load of hate mail and even death threats. I’m not used to that at all, it really scared me. … But apparently there were a lot of outraged Catholics. On the advice of my wife, I even removed our nameplate from the front door.