John Lydon’s 1978 warnings on Jimmy Savile censored by BBC

This video from Britain says about itself:

Piers Morgan’s Life Stories – Friday 25 September 2015 at 9pm on ITV.

John Lydon discusses what’s in his bag.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

John Lydon says he was ‘banned from BBC’ over Jimmy Savile comments

The former Sex Pistol says he ‘did his bit’ to alert the public to Savile but that his comments made in 1978 were never aired

Thursday 24 September 2015 11.54 BST

John Lydon has claimed he was banned from the BBC after speaking out against Jimmy Savile.

The former Sex Pistol was referring to an interview he’d given in 1978, during which he had said that Savile was “into all sorts of seediness. We all know about it but we’re not allowed to talk about it. I know some rumours.”

Speaking to Piers Morgan for his Life Stories show, he said: “I’m very, very bitter that the likes of Savile and the rest of them were allowed to continue. I did my bit, I said what I had to. But they didn’t air that.”

He continued: “I found myself banned from BBC radio for quite a while, for my contentious behaviour. They wouldn’t state this directly; there’d be other excuses.”

The band were already in the BBC’s bad books before Lydon’s Savile comments: God Save The Queen received a total ban on radio play from the corporation in May 1977. Lydon didn’t go into the specifics of what the ban entailed, although he said: “Weren’t I right? I think most kids wanted to go on Top of the Pops but we all knew what that cigar muncher was up to.”

US soldiers in Afghanistan told not to stop child abuse

This video from the USA says about itself:

US Tax $ Funds PedophiliaWikiLeaks

3 January 2011

Cenk Uygur (host of The Young Turks) shares the latest revelation from WikiLeaks regarding US taxpayer money going to fund sex with underage boys in Afghanistan.

The now infamous Wikileaks recently released a cable from Afghanistan revealing U.S. government contractor DynCorp threw a party for Afghan security recruits featuring trafficked boys as the entertainment. Bacha bazi is the Afghan tradition of “boy play” where young boys are dressed up in women’s clothing, forced to dance for leering men, and then sold for sex to the highest bidder. Apparently this is the sort of “entertainment” funded by your tax dollars when DynCorp is in charge of security in Afghanistan.

DynCorp is a government contractor which has been providing training for Afghan security and police forces for several years. Though the company is about as transparent as a lead-coated rock, most reports claim over 95% of their budget comes from U.S. taxpayers. That’s the same budget that DynCorp used to pay for a party in Kunduz Province for some Afghan police trainees. The entertainment for the evening was bacha bazi boys, whose pimps were paid so the boys would sing and dance for the recruits and then be raped by them afterward. That’s your tax dollars at work — fighting terrorism and extremism in Afghnistan by trafficking little boys for sex with cops-in-training.

In fact, the evidence linking DynCorp to bacha bazi was so damning, Afghan Minister of the Interior Hanif Atmar tried to quash the story. Upon hearing a journalist was investigating DynCorp and the U.S. government’s funding of the sex trafficking of young boys in Afghanistan, Atmar warned any publication of the story would “endanger lives,” and requested the U.S. suppress the story. Atmar admitted he had arrested eleven Afghans nationals as “facilitators” of the bacha bazi party. But he was only charging them with “purchasing a service from a child,” which is illegal under Sharia law and the civil code. And in this case “services” is not used as a euphemism for sex; so far, no one is being held accountable for the young boys whose rapes were paid for by the U.S. taxpayers.

As if this story couldn’t get any more outrageous, Atmar went on to say that if news of the incident got out, he was “worried about the image of foreign mentors”. In other words, why should something as piddling as the humiliation, objectification, sale, and rape of some children tarnish the good name of DynCorp and all the work (read: money) they’re doing in Afghanistan? After all, bacha bazi is growing in popularity in Afghanistan, especially in areas like Kunduz. Why shouldn’t U.S. government contractors be able to win local favor by pimping young boys?

Of course, this isn’t the first time DynCorp has used U.S. tax dollars to support sex trafficking. In Bosnia in 1999, Kathryn Bolkovac was fired from the company after blowing the whistle on DynCorp’s staffers pimping out girls as young as 12 from Eastern European countries. DynCorp settled a lawsuit involving Bolkovac, and her story was recently featured in The Whistleblower, where she was portrayed by Rachel Weiss. It’s a happy ending for one DynCorp whistle blower, but will there be a Bolkovac in Afghanistan?

It’s time American taxpayers demanded a zero tolerance policy on our money being used to support child sex trafficking overseas. Tell the UN Mission to Afghanistan the time has come to crack down on those who buy and sell boys in bacha bazi, whether they’re Afghans or U.S. government contractors, security personnel or citizens. No one should be able to traffic children so sex and get away with it, and that includes repeat offender DynCorp. We have a right to demand our tax dollars go to fight trafficking, not support it. And we have a right to demand the U.S. government and their contractors be held accountable for exploiting the boys of Afghanistan.

From the New York Times in the USA:

U.S. Soldiers Told to Ignore Afghan Allies’ Abuse of Boys


SEPT. 20, 2015

KABUL, Afghanistan — In his last phone call home, Lance Cpl. Gregory Buckley Jr. told his father what was troubling him: From his bunk in southern Afghanistan, he could hear Afghan police officers sexually abusing boys they had brought to the base.

“At night we can hear them screaming, but we’re not allowed to do anything about it,” the Marine’s father, Gregory Buckley Sr., recalled his son telling him before he was shot to death at the base in 2012. He urged his son to tell his superiors. “My son said that his officers told him to look the other way because it’s their culture.”

Related Coverage:

U.S. Denies an Airstrike Killed 11 Afghan Narcotics Officers

Rampant sexual abuse of children has long been a problem in Afghanistan, particularly among armed commanders who dominate much of the rural landscape and can bully the population. The practice is called bacha bazi, literally “boy play,” and American soldiers and Marines have been instructed not to intervene — in some cases, not even when their Afghan allies have abused boys on military bases, according to interviews and court records.

The policy has endured as American forces have recruited and organized Afghan militias to help hold territory against the Taliban. But soldiers and Marines have been increasingly troubled that instead of weeding out pedophiles, the American military was arming them in some cases and placing them as the commanders of villages — and doing little when they began abusing children.

“The reason we were here is because we heard the terrible things the Taliban were doing to people, how they were taking away human rights,” said Dan Quinn, a former Special Forces captain who beat up an American-backed militia commander for keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave. “But we were putting people into power who would do things that were worse than the Taliban did — that was something village elders voiced to me.”

The policy of instructing soldiers to ignore child sexual abuse by their Afghan allies is coming under new scrutiny, particularly as it emerges that service members like Captain Quinn have faced discipline, even career ruin, for disobeying it.

After the beating, the Army relieved Captain Quinn of his command and pulled him from Afghanistan. He has since left the military.

Four years later, the Army is also trying to forcibly retire Sgt. First Class Charles Martland, a Special Forces member who joined Captain Quinn in beating up the commander.

“The Army contends that Martland and others should have looked the other way (a contention that I believe is nonsense),” Representative Duncan Hunter, a California Republican who hopes to save Sergeant Martland’s career, wrote last week to the Pentagon’s inspector general.

In Sergeant Martland’s case, the Army said it could not comment because of the Privacy Act.

When asked about American military policy, the spokesman for the American command in Afghanistan, Col. Brian Tribus, wrote in an email: “Generally, allegations of child sexual abuse by Afghan military or police personnel would be a matter of domestic Afghan criminal law.” He added that “there would be no express requirement that U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan report it.” An exception, he said, is when rape is being used as a weapon of war.

The American policy of nonintervention is intended to maintain good relations with the Afghan police and militia units the United States has trained to fight the Taliban. It also reflects a reluctance to impose cultural values in a country where pederasty is rife, particularly among powerful men, for whom being surrounded by young teenagers can be a mark of social status.

Some soldiers believed that the policy made sense, even if they were personally distressed at the sexual predation they witnessed or heard about.

“The bigger picture was fighting the Taliban,” a former Marine lance corporal reflected. “It wasn’t to stop molestation.”

Still, the former lance corporal, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to avoid offending fellow Marines, recalled feeling sickened the day he entered a room on a base and saw three or four men lying on the floor with children between them. “I’m not a hundred percent sure what was happening under the sheet, but I have a pretty good idea of what was going on,” he said.

But the American policy of treating child sexual abuse as a cultural issue has often alienated the villages whose children are being preyed upon. The pitfalls of the policy emerged clearly as American Special Forces soldiers began to form Afghan Local Police militias to hold villages that American forces had retaken from the Taliban in 2010 and 2011.

By the summer of 2011, Captain Quinn and Sergeant Martland, both Green Berets on their second tour in northern Kunduz Province, began to receive dire complaints about the Afghan Local Police units they were training and supporting.

First, they were told, one of the militia commanders raped a 14- or 15-year-old girl whom he had spotted working in the fields. Captain Quinn informed the provincial police chief, who soon levied punishment. “He got one day in jail, and then she was forced to marry him,” Mr. Quinn said.

When he asked a superior officer what more he could do, he was told that he had done well to bring it up with local officials but that there was nothing else to be done. “We’re being praised for doing the right thing, and a guy just got away with raping a 14-year-old girl,” Mr. Quinn said.

Village elders grew more upset at the predatory behavior of American-backed commanders. After each case, Captain Quinn would gather the Afghan commanders and lecture them on human rights.

Soon another commander absconded with his men’s wages. Mr. Quinn said he later heard that the commander had spent the money on dancing boys. Another commander murdered his 12-year-old daughter in a so-called honor killing for having kissed a boy. “There were no repercussions,” Mr. Quinn recalled.

In September 2011, an Afghan woman, visibly bruised, showed up at an American base with her son, who was limping. One of the Afghan police commanders in the area, Abdul Rahman, had abducted the boy and forced him to become a sex slave, chained to his bed, the woman explained. When she sought her son’s return, she herself was beaten. Her son had eventually been released, but she was afraid it would happen again, she told the Americans on the base.

She explained that because “her son was such a good-looking kid, he was a status symbol” coveted by local commanders, recalled Mr. Quinn, who did not speak to the woman directly but was told about her visit when he returned to the base from a mission later that day.

So Captain Quinn summoned Abdul Rahman and confronted him about what he had done. The police commander acknowledged that it was true, but brushed it off. When the American officer began to lecture about “how you are held to a higher standard if you are working with U.S. forces, and people expect more of you,” the commander began to laugh.

“I picked him up and threw him onto the ground,” Mr. Quinn said. Sergeant Martland joined in, he said. “I did this to make sure the message was understood that if he went back to the boy, that it was not going to be tolerated,” Mr. Quinn recalled.

There is disagreement over the extent of the commander’s injuries. Mr. Quinn said they were not serious, which was corroborated by an Afghan official who saw the commander afterward.

Sergeant Martland, who received a Bronze Star for valor for his actions during a Taliban ambush, wrote in a letter to the Army this year that he and Mr. Quinn “felt that morally we could no longer stand by and allow our A.L.P. to commit atrocities,” referring to the Afghan Local Police.

The father of Lance Corporal Buckley believes the policy of looking away from sexual abuse was a factor in his son’s death, and he has filed a lawsuit to press the Marine Corps for more information about it.

Lance Corporal Buckley and two other Marines were killed in 2012 by one of a large entourage of boys living at their base with an Afghan police commander named Sarwar Jan.

Mr. Jan had long had a bad reputation; in 2010, two Marine officers managed to persuade the Afghan authorities to arrest him following a litany of abuses, including corruption, support for the Taliban and child abduction. But just two years later, the police commander was back with a different unit, working at Lance Corporal Buckley’s post, Forward Operating Base Delhi, in Helmand Province.

Lance Corporal Buckley had noticed that a large entourage of “tea boys” — domestic servants who are sometimes pressed into sexual slavery — had arrived with Mr. Jan and moved into the same barracks, one floor below the Marines. He told his father about it during his final call home.

Word of Mr. Jan’s new position also reached the Marine officers who had gotten him arrested in 2010. One of them, Maj. Jason Brezler, dashed out an email to Marine officers at F.O.B. Delhi, warning them about Mr. Jan and attaching a dossier about him.

The warning was never heeded. About two weeks later, one of the older boys with Mr. Jan — around 17 years old — grabbed a rifle and killed Lance Corporal Buckley and the other Marines.

Lance Corporal Buckley’s father still agonizes about whether the killing occurred because of the sexual abuse by an American ally. “As far as the young boys are concerned, the Marines are allowing it to happen and so they’re guilty by association,” Mr. Buckley said. “They don’t know our Marines are sick to their stomachs.”

The one American service member who was punished in the investigation that followed was Major Brezler, who had sent the email warning about Mr. Jan, his lawyers said. In one of Major Brezler’s hearings, Marine Corps lawyers warned that information about the police commander’s penchant for abusing boys might be classified. The Marine Corps has initiated proceedings to discharge Major Brezler.

Mr. Jan appears to have moved on, to a higher-ranking police command in the same province. In an interview, he denied keeping boys as sex slaves or having any relationship with the boy who killed the three Marines. “No, it’s all untrue,” Mr. Jan said. But people who know him say he still suffers from “a toothache problem,” a euphemism here for child sexual abuse.

US JETS blitzed the northern Afghan city of Kunduz yesterday in preparation for a government counteroffensive against the Taliban: here.

Sandra Bland, other African American women, and Texas police

This 25 July 2015 video from the USA is called Sandra Bland March & Vigil in Houston, Texas.

From the Voice of America:

Anger About Black Texas Woman’s Death in Jail Still Strong

Greg Flakus

August 07, 2015 8:20 PM

PRAIRIE VIEW, TEXAS— A makeshift memorial marks the spot where Sandra Bland was arrested after a traffic stop on July 10.

On July 13, she was found dead in her jail cell. Officials say it was suicide.

Bland’s college classmate Alex McGrew doubts that story.

“She was fun to be around,” he said. “She was a cool person and definitely not a sad, suicidal person at all.”

In video recordings she posted on Facebook, her lively, warm personality is evident. But she also spoke about struggling with depression.

“Do not let the depression hold you down; do not let it keep you in the spot where you are, because depression is nothing but the devil,” Bland says in one of the videos.

Those who believe she did take her life blame the Waller County Jail for being negligent and the state trooper who arrested her for being far too aggressive.

“She should not have died in that jail because, if at all, she should have been given a ticket and she should have been on her way,” U.S. Representative Al Green said at one community gathering.

The charge against Bland, 28, was assault on a police officer, which former Waller County Justice of the Peace Dewayne Charleston says set her up for poor treatment in jail.

“They would have denied her phone privileges; they would have delivered her meals late; they would have made her life miserable,” he said.

Waller County officials have denied any improper treatment of Bland in jail.

Some black people in Texas are willing to give officials the benefit of the doubt and await the result of investigations. But many others see the Bland case in the light of past discrimination.

The student population at nearby Prairie View A&M University, where Bland had gone to school, will swell to 9,000 by the end of the month, and Charleston plans to seek their support.

“When the 9,000 students come back, and all the faculty members come back from vacation, it is going to be a whole different ball game,” he said.

If there has not been a satisfactory resolution of the Bland case in the next few weeks, when students start arriving for the fall semester, activists say there will be many more, and much larger, protests.

Charnesia Corley (photo: Screenshot/ABC13)

From Raw Story in the USA:

Texas cops accused of threatening to break woman’s legs during public strip search

Bethania Palma Markus

07 Aug 2015 at 16:36 ET

A Texas woman says she suffered a nightmare scenario in which Harris County sheriff’s deputies sexually assaulted her in public during a traffic stop last month.

Charnesia Corley, 21, said officers with the Harris County Sheriff’s Department made her pull her pants down and did a body cavity search without her consent while she was lying in a gas station parking lot, according to ABC13.

Corley was driving to a nearby market when she was stopped by deputies. The department told the station she was pulled over for running a stop sign. After stopping her, the deputy ordered Corley out of her car because he said he smelled weed. He cuffed her and placed her in his patrol vehicle parked at a gas station.

After searching Corley’s car and finding nothing, the deputy returned to his car and said he smelled pot there. He called for a female deputy to search Corley, who ordered Corley out of the car and onto the ground.

“Then she tells me to pull my pants down,” Corley told ABC13. “I told her, I said, ‘well ma’am, I don’t have any underwear on.’ She says, ‘well that doesn’t matter. Pull your pants down.’”

While Corley was lying on the ground by her car in the parking lot, the deputy told her, “open your legs.” Corley said she responded that she didn’t want to.

“So she says, ‘well if you don’t open them, I’m going to break them,’” Corley said. “All I could do was just lay there. I felt helpless.”

Corley was charged with resisting arrest and possession of marijuana after deputies allegedly found .02 ounces of marijuana.

However, the department also argued that Corley consented to the search, which seemingly contradicts the allegation that she resisted.

Corley’s attorney, Sam Cammack, said a search in a public place like that is a violation of her civil rights.

“It’s undeniable that the search is unconstitutional,” he told ABC13.

As of now, Corley plans to file an internal affairs complaint.

Corley isn’t the only African-American Texas woman whose treatment by law enforcement has raised concern. Last month, Sandra Bland, 28, was arrested and and found dead in her Waller County jail cell, all because a Texas trooper pulled her over for failing to use her turn signal.

19-Year-Old Unarmed College Student Fatally Shot by Texas Police. Christian Taylor was all set to start his sophomore year at Angelo State University when he was shot dead by police, who claim that he was attempting to rob a car dealership, a claim his family finds hard to believe: here. And here.

British Prime Minister Heath, more child abuse accusations

This video from Britain says about itself:

Edward Heath abuse claims: the investigations

4 August 2015

Three police forces are now investigating historic child sex abuse claims against former Conservative Prime Minister Edward Heath.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Four forces and IPCC now looking at Heath abuse allegations

Wednesday 5th August 2015

FOUR police forces and the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) are now investigating allegations that Tory prime minister Edward Heath abused children.

The Star reported yesterday that Heath was at the heart of an IPCC corruption probe into Wiltshire Police, which allegedly dropped the trial of a person arrested on an unrelated charge in the 1990s after they threatened to expose the then-backbench MP who died in 2005.

The probe is being backed up by Wiltshire Police’s own investigation — and now the States of Jersey Police’s Operation Whistle, Kent Police and the Metropolitan Police are also reportedly involved.

Sir Edward Heath does feature as part of Operation Whistle, currently investigating historical allegations of abuse in Jersey,” a spokeswoman for the island’s force confirmed.

Wiltshire Police said that it and children’s charity NSPCC had received “a number of calls” after appealing on Monday for victims and witnesses to come forward.

One man has claimed that the former PM raped him in 1961 when he was just 12 years old, but that when he spoke up about the Conservative MP’s assault he was branded “a liar and a fantasist.”

Whistle was started following revelations about serious abuse at a Jersey care home and now notorious paedophile Jimmy Savile. Detectives on the island said in June that they were looking at 45 suspects, 13 of whom were “of public prominence.”

She said that Jersey officers were working with Operation Hydrant, a Britain-wide scheme that co-ordinates sex abuse probes.

The sprawling web of investigations is yet another indication of a potential cover-up of sex attacks on children by Establishment figures.

The cascade of revelations followed the IPCC’s announcement of its corruption probe into Wiltshire Police.

The force reportedly shelved the trial of a woman who was in charge of a brothel after she threatened to expose Mr Heath.

The Met refused to confirm whether it was looking into Mr Heath. Kent police has confirmed it is investigating a report of a sexual assault committed in East Kent in the 1960s, linked to Mr Heath by the alleged victim.

See also here.

Jersey: Among those who regularly visited the Haut de la Garenne home was the now-disgraced entertainer Jimmy Savile. “Jimmy Savile often stayed in the same hotel as Ted Heath,” McGrath Goodman told the dpa news agency, adding that both men were alleged to have taken children from Haut de la Garenne: here.

Gloucestershire Police has said it has received an allegation involving the sexual abuse of a child against the former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath. It becomes the sixth police force looking into claims against the former Tory leader, after The Met, Wiltshire, Kent, Jersey and Hampshire services: here.

Claims police covered up historical child sex abuse by MPs and officers investigated: here.

British Conservative politician boasted about child abuse cover-ups

This video from Britain says about itself:

Tim Fortescue from ‘Westminster’s Secret Service’ BBC 1995

A short extract from the Michael Cockerell documentary ‘Westminster’s Secret Service’ broadcast by the BBC in 1995.

Tim Fortescue was a Whip under Edward Heath between 1970 and 1973. In the documentary it was revealed that the Chief Whip kept a little black ‘dirt book‘ which contained information about MPs, and this was used as a method of political control.

According to this list of British Conservative party chief whips, during the early part of Heath’s time as Prime Minister, 1970-1973, the Chief Whip was Francis Pym. From 1973 on, it was Humphrey Edward Gregory Atkins, Baron Colnbrook.

“Anyone with any sense who was in trouble would come to the Whips and tell them the truth, and say now, “I’m in a jam, can you help?” It might be debt, it might be a scandal involving small boys, or any kind of scandal which a member seemed likely to be mixed up in, they’d come and ask if we could help. And if we could, we did. We would do everything we can because we would store up brownie points. That sounds a pretty nasty reason but one of the reasons is, if we can get a chap out of trouble, he’ll do as we ask forever more.”

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Ted Heath child sex abuse claims: Footage shows Tory whip saying government could cover up scandals involving MPs and ‘small boys’

Tim Fortescue said in 1995: ‘We would do anything we could to help – for brownie points’

by Adam Withnall

Tuesday 04 August 2015

A senior whip in the government of the former Tory Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath boasted that he helped Westminster politicians at the time avoid being exposed for “scandals involving small boys”.

Tim Fortescue, a whip under Heath between 1970 and 1973, spoke to the BBC for a documentary entitled “Westminster’s Secret Service”, in which he said the Prime Minister’s Chief Whip kept a little black “dirt book” of MPs’ secrets to maintain political control.

Heath has this week been named as the subject of claims of child sex abuse, made in the 1990s, and the independent police watchdog has launched a probe in to Wiltshire Police’s handling of the accusations.

Fortescue, who died in 2008 aged 92, was a Tory MP for eight years until 1974. The footage of him speaking to the BBC in 1995 emerged last year as the Westminster child abuse scandal came to light.

Then, Fortescue said problems involving members “might be debt, or it might be a scandal involving small boys”.

“They would come and ask if we could help,” Fortescue said. “And if we could we did, and we would do everything we could, because we could store up brownie points.

“That’s one of the reasons we would get a chap out of trouble – because he’d then be ours forever-more.”

Heath, who died 10 years ago, has been accused of raping a 12-year-old boy in his Mayfair flat in 1961. In an interview with The Mirror, the alleged victim, now in his 60s, claimed he was picked up while hitchhiking.

Wiltshire Police has appealed for potential victims of Sir Edward to come forward, after launching an inquiry on the back of allegations made by a retired senior officer.

Labour MP Tom Watson, who used parliamentary privilege to raise claims of a paedophile ring linked to Downing Street, told The Independent: “I received information in 2012 concerning allegations of child abuse carried out by Edward Heath and a separate claim concerning Heath was made to me subsequently.

“I passed them both to the police, who have confirmed to me that at least one of those allegations is being investigated and taken seriously.

“I continue to call for a central police investigation unit for the country . Maybe this investigation would have moved faster had there been one.”

An IPCC spokesman has said it will investigate allegations concerning the force’s handling of an “alleged claim of child sexual abuse made in the 1990s”.

He added: “It is alleged that a criminal prosecution was not pursued when a person threatened to expose that Sir Edward Heath may have been involved in offences concerning children“.

Edward Heath child sex abuse claims: Convicted brothel keeper Myra Ling-Ling Forde threatened to expose former Tory Prime Minister: here.

British Prime Minister Heath, child abuser?

This video from England says about itself:

Sir Edward Heath named in child sex abuse investigation

3 August 2015

Wiltshire Police appeals for anyone who believes they may have been victim of former Prime Minister as IPCC announces inquiry into handling of claims.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Edward Heath ‘child sex abuse‘ allegation: Investigation to be held into Wiltshire police handling of alleged claim in the 1990s

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) will be conducting the investigation

Loulla-Mae Eleftheriou-Smith

Monday 03 August 2015

The police watchdog is to investigate Wiltshire police’s handling of a child sex abuse claim allegedly made against former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath in the 1990s.

The force is to be probed after allegations made by a retired senior officer were referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC).

An IPCC spokesman said it is to investigate “allegations concerning Wiltshire Police’s handling of an alleged claim of child sexual abuse made in the 1990s”.

He added: “It is alleged that a criminal prosecution was not pursued, when a person threatened to expose that Sir Edward Heath may have been involved in offences concerning children.

“In addition to this allegation, the IPCC will examine whether Wiltshire Police subsequently took any steps to investigate these claims.”

Heath, a Conservative, was prime minister between 1970 and 1974 and had a home in Wiltshire county. He died in 2005.

Read more:

Edward Heath ‘child sex abuse claims’: Full statement by the IPCC
Edward Health ‘child sex claims’: Wiltshire Police statement in full

Wiltshire Police said it is carrying out enquiries to identify if there are any witnesses or victims who support the allegations of child sex abuse.

A police spokesperson said: “On becoming aware of the information, Wiltshire Police informed the IPCC and later made a mandatory referral. The IPCC investigation will specifically consider how the force responded to allegations when they were received in the 1990s.

“Sir Edward Heath has been named in relation to offences concerning children. He lived in Salisbury for many y[e]ars and we would like to hear from anyone who has any relevant information that may assist us in our enquiries or anyone who believes they may have been a victim.”

“We take all reports of child abuse, either current or that occurred in the past very seriously. Victims will receive support throughout any investigation and associated judicial process.

“If there is evidence of offences having been committed we will ensure that, if possible, those responsible are held to account through a thorough and detailed investigation. This includes any other parties who are identified as having been involved in child sex abuse.”

Wiltshire Police stressed that it is working with the NSPCC to ensure that any victims are appropriately supported and urged people to contact the force and not to suffer in silence.

Wiltshire Police and Crime Commissioner Angus Macpherson said his office has monitored the process of the investigation “at every stage,” adding that he will be “watching closely to see if any evidence of corruption or poor practice is uncovered”.

“My priority as Commissioner is to put the interests of victims at the heart of everything we do, as well as holding the Force to account for its performance,” he said.

Read more:

Lord Janner allegations to be investigated by child sex abuse inquiry
6 things you need to know about the historic child sex abuse inquiry
Child sex abuse inquiry: The five areas to be investigated

“We have often seen from high profile national cases that victims, who have not spoken of their abuse for many years, find their voice and speak out. I want any victims of child sex abuse, whether current or historic, to know they can have confidence in the service they will receive from Wiltshire Police.”

NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said it is important that those who believe they may have been the victims of abuse have the confidence to speak up.

“Whether abuse happened in the past, or is occurring today, whether those being accused are authority figures or not, allegations of crimes against children must be investigated thoroughly.

“While some people wait years before speaking out we would urge them to act quickly so they can get help as soon as possible. Our trained helpline counsellors are always on duty round the clock to listen and provide assistance.”

Ted Heath: police appeal for victims to come forward over child abuse claims. Metropolitan police detectives have spoken to a man who came forward more than two years ago and claims he was a victim of Heath when he was a teenager: here.

See also here.

British MI5, Margaret Thatcher, child abuse cover-up document

This 22 January 2015 video from Britain says about itself:

Leon Brittan: will new answers emerge on abuse claims? | Channel 4 News

Leon Brittan’s final years were dogged by controversy over those historic sexual abuse allegations – so will his death bring any new information into the public domain?

By Paddy McGuffin in Britain:

Ministers told to reveal all on abuse cover-up

Friday 24th July 2015

Shock files reveal MI5 and Thatcher collusion on top Tory paedophile

THE government was urged to hand over all relevant papers to the child abuse inquiry yesterday after a damning leaked document revealed MI5 and Margaret Thatcher’s administration colluded in a cover-up.

The files show that former MI5 director-general Sir Antony Duff wrote to the then cabinet secretary Sir Robert Armstrong in 1986 over allegations made by two sources regarding an MP “who had a penchant for little boys.”

But Mr Duff warned that “the risks of political embarrassment to the government is rather greater than the security danger,” discounting the child abuse risk.

Napac chief executive Gabrielle Shaw, whose organisation supports survivors of child abuse, told the Star that the fact the documents had only just come to light was “shocking.”

She said: “It is ineptitude at best, and far more suspicious at worst.

“It does not do any favours for survivors when there are whispers of a cover-up and this just adds more fuel to the fire.

“It is good that it has come out now, but you can understand why some people might well be asking: ‘What else has not been handed over?’”

She added that the documents gave “a very disturbing insight into the culture of the times.”

Peter Wanless, head of child protection charity NSPCC, and Richard Whittam QC, who together carried out an inquiry into the handling of historical Westminster abuse allegations, said the documents had reinforced their view that allegations of crimes against children, particularly the rights of the complainant, were given considerably less serious consideration than would be expected today.

The Home Office confirmed that a fresh search of the archives had been carried out after a file emerged earlier this year that should have been submitted to the Wanless and Whittam inquiry.

Former Cabinet minister Leon Brittan, one-time Thatcher aide Peter Morrison, ex-diplomat Sir Peter Hayman and former minister William van Straubenzee were named in other top secret files uncovered following the review.

One of the files relating to Sir Hayman was held by the Cabinet Office but had been “overlooked” during a previous search.

Documents that refer to Mr Straubenzee had been earmarked for destruction, but National Archives officials flagged them up to the government.