Dutch young wolves, first ever video


This August 2019 video is about the first young wolves born in the Netherlands ever since the 19th century.

Patrick van Es made this video in the Veluwe region.

There are now three adult wolves and 3-5 pups in that region.

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White wolves in Canadian Arctic, video


This 19 August 2019 video, recorded in Canada, says about itself:

The Wolf Queen and Cubs | Kingdom of the White Wolf

The high Arctic is the realm of the Arctic wolf. On Ellesmere Island, these wolves‘ line is unbroken, reaching back ten thousand years.

About Kingdom of the White Wolf:

Watch photographer Ronan Donovan as he tracks and observes Arctic wolves. The three-hour special airs on August 25 starting at 8/9c on Nat Geo WILD.

Wolves, cougars, elk in Yellowstone, USA


This video says about itself:

Fearless predator – Cougar attack bears, deer and jaguar

Puma (mountain lion, cougar) is a predator of the Puma [genus] of the cat family. It lives in North and South America.

From the S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources, Utah State University in the USA:

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators

August 2, 2019

Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park.

The study highlights that where prey live with more than one predator species, attention to one predator that ignores the role of another may lead to misunderstandings about the impact of predators on prey populations and ecosystems. It also offers new insight into how prey can use differences in hunting behavior among predators to maintain safety from all predators simultaneously.

Utah State University researchers Michel Kohl and Dan MacNulty co-led the study, published in Ecology Letters, with Toni Ruth (Hornocker Wildlife Institute and Wildlife Conservation Society), Matt Metz (University of Montana), Dan Stahler, Doug Smith, and P.J. White (Yellowstone National Park). Their work was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation, Ford Foundation, and Utah State University as part of Kohl’s doctoral research. The study was based on long-term data from the Park’s wolf and elk monitoring programs and Ruth’s cougar research, which is detailed in a forthcoming book from the University Press of Colorado.

The team revisited global positioning system (GPS) data from 27 radio-collared elk that had been collected in 2001-2004 when numbers of wolves and cougars were highest. Kohl and MacNulty combined the elk GPS data with information on the daily activity patterns of GPS-collared cougars and wolves and the locations of cougar- and wolf-killed elk to test if elk avoided these predators by selecting for ‘vacant hunting domains’, places and times where and when neither predator was likely to kill elk.

“Cougars hunted mainly in forested, rugged areas at night, whereas wolves hunted mainly in grassy, flat areas during morning and at dusk” said Kohl, lead author of the paper and now an assistant professor at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia in Athens. “Elk sidestepped both cougars and wolves by selecting for areas outside these high-risk domains, namely forested, rugged areas during daylight when cougars were resting, and grassy, flat areas at night when wolves were snoozing.”

Recognizing that cougars and wolves hunted in different places and at different times allowed the researchers to see how elk could simultaneously minimize threats from both predators. “Had we ignored the fact that these predators were on different schedules, we would have concluded, incorrectly, that avoiding one predator necessarily increased exposure to the other,” said MacNulty, who is an associate professor in USU’s Department of Wildland Resources and Ecology Center. “Movement out of the grassy, flat areas and into the forested, rugged areas to avoid wolves did not result in greater risk from cougars and vice versa because these predators were active at different times of the day.”

Despite the compatibility of elk spatial responses to cougars and wolves, Ruth, who is now executive director of the Salmon Valley Stewardship in Salmon, Idaho, cautioned that “some adult elk still end up on the cougar and wolf menu, with those in poor condition during winter being most at risk.”

Nevertheless, “the findings help explain why we observe wolves, cougars, and elk all coexisting and thriving on the Yellowstone landscape” said Stahler, who leads the current study of cougars in the Park. He notes that the ability of elk to coexist with wolves and cougars is consistent with their “long, shared evolutionary history”.

More surprising, however, was that cougars, not wolves, exerted the most pressure on elk habitat selection. “Wolves are often the presumed or blamed predator for any change in a prey population, numerical or behavioral,” said Smith, who leads the Park’s wolf program. “Our research shows that this is not necessarily true, and that other large predators in addition to wolves need to be considered.”

“Despite the fact that most prey species live in habitats with multiple predators, the majority of research on predator-prey interactions focuses on a single predator species,” added Betsy von Holle, program director for the National Science Foundation’s Division of Environmental Biology. “The novelty of this research is the simultaneous study of multiple predator species, revealing the complexity of predator avoidance behavior by the prey.”

Yellowstone, USA wolves hunting, video


This 30 July 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

After a long winter, the wolves of Yellowstone go after weaker prey.

RNA — the short-lived transcripts of genes — from the “Tumat puppy”, a wolf of the Pleistocene era has been isolated, and its sequence analyzed in a new study by Oliver Smith of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues publishing on July 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The results establish the possibility of examining a range of RNA transcripts from ancient organisms, a possibility previously thought to be extremely unlikely because of the short lifespan of RNA: here.

Wolves eating fish, unique video


This 4 July 2019 video from Minnesota in the USA says about itself:

Wolves Catching and Eating Fish: First-Ever Video | Nat Geo Wild

Groundbreaking research in Voyageurs National Park, MN, reveals that the region’s wolves developed a diverse diet that includes fish and fruit.

Dutch young wolves born, after 200 years


This 2016 video from Arctic Canada says about itself:

Babysitting Cute Wolf Pups | Snow Wolf Family And Me | BBC

With the adults gone Gordon tries to get a closer look at the wolf pups and see if he can spot any differences between them.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that three young wolves were born in the Veluwe region in April this year.

This camera trap video shows them.

They are the first wolf cubs born in the Netherlands since about 200 years ago, when the species was exterminated.

Their parents probably came from Germany last year.