Owls and wolves, video


This video says about itself:

Master of the Sky: Owl Vs Wolf – Super Powered Owls – BBC

15 April 2016

Owls have an amazing aerial agility, a great defensive move especially when you have young to protect.

Lynx meets wolf in Poland, video


This video says about itself:

Rare encounter of wolf and lynx in nature

Watch the exceptional encounter between the highly threatened wolf and a family of lynx in Poland’s wild forests. See also here.

Both animals have bounced back from the brink of extinction in Europe thanks to strong protection under EU Nature laws, but they are still at risk. We are campaigning to ensure that Europe’s beauties of nature are effectively protected.

Learn more about WWF campaign here.

Wolves’ sex life, video


This video says about itself:

Wolves Unable to Separate After Sex! – Animal Attraction – BBC

29 January 2016

The alpha couple will actively discourage last years offspring from mating to ensure that there are not more mouths to feed, but a young male seems adamant to pursue the interest of one young female…

‘Dutch’ wolf to Dutch museum


This video says about itself:

Wolf spotted in Netherlands for first time in over 100 years

13 March 2015

A wolf has been seen in the Netherlands for the first time in over a century, with footage showing the predator trotting around near a railway track in Noord-Sleen.

Then, that wolf went back to its native Germany; where a truck killed it.

Today, Dutch radio reported that this wolf is coming back to the Netherlands. Later this year, it will be included in the collection of Naturalis museum in Leiden.

Ice age wolf’s bone discovery on Texel island


The Texel wolf's bone. photo: Ecomare

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands:

Dec 24, 2015 – An exciting discovery on the beach at beach post 12 on Texel. Hiker Els ten Napel found a big bone in the sand. Because she wanted to know what animal it came from, she took it to Ecomare. It proved to be a bone from the Ice Age. Judging from the shape, it is a thigh bone of a wolf. On Texel fossil bones are found regularly, they come from the seabed to the beach. …

From the deep brown color of the wolf’s bone you can see that it probably dates from the last ice age. It would therefore be between 10,000 and 100,000 years old. Wolves were quite common in the last ice age. They hunted many large herbivorous animals that were here then. There were at that time also other carnivorous animals: lions, hyenas, brown bears and humans, but they were a lot rarer. Ecomare has the bones of these predators from the ice age in the collection.

First winter snow at International Wolf Center


This video from Minnesota in the USA says about itself:

International Wolf Center – First Snow of Winter – 20 November 2015

The International Wolf Center advances the survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wildlands and the human role in their future.

‘Wolves more intelligent than dogs’, new research


This video says about itself:

Wolves and dog

10 February 2009

Friendship of the wolves and the German Shepherd

By Bob Yirka:

Wolves found to be better at problem-solving task than domesticated dogs

September 16, 2015

(Phys.org)—Monique Udell, a researcher with Oregon State University, has found via experimentation, that domestic dogs appear to have lost some of their problem solving abilities as a result of their long history with humans. In her paper published in the journal Biology Letters, she describes a study she carried out and offers some theories on why she believe domesticated dogs may have lost some of their natural skills.

Udell notes that have long been known to work with people as they go about their lives, in contrast to animals in the wild—one such striking behavior is their tendency to look back at their human companion when faced with a perplexing situation—seemingly asking for help. To learn more about this behavior, Udell enlisted the assistance of ten dogs that live as pets (and their owners), ten that live in shelters, and ten that have been raised by humans.

Each of the animals was presented with a tasty sausage, which they were allowed to sniff, but not eat. Instead, the sausage was placed inside of a with a snap-on lid connected to a short length of rope. To open the , the animals needed to pull on the rope while holding down the container—a task Udell deemed relatively easy for animals as smart as dogs and wolves. Udell conducted the experiments in two ways, one where the animal was left alone with the container, the other where there was a human (their owners) standing close by.

Udell reports that none of the pet dogs was able to open the container and just one of the was able to do so, but eight of the ten wolves succeeded. The presence of a person nearby didn’t help much, the same number of wolves succeeded and one pet did so. She notes that all of the dogs from both groups spent a lot more of their time looking at the person, than did the wolves. Next, Udell allowed a human to offer encouragement to the dogs—doing so increased the success rate of the shelter dogs, four of them opened the container, but still just one pet dog was able to do it.

The experiment is intriguing Udell notes, because all of the dogs and wolves were capable of opening the container, but only the wolves were truly motivated to do so, as demonstrated by a much higher level of persistence—the dogs on the other hand appeared much more ready to ask for help.

More information: When dogs look back: inhibition of independent problem-solving behaviour in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) compared with wolves (Canis lupus), Biology Letters, Published 16 September 2015.DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0489

Abstract

Domestic dogs have been recognized for their social sensitivity and aptitude in human-guided tasks. For example, prior studies have demonstrated that dogs look to humans when confronted with an unsolvable task; an action often interpreted as soliciting necessary help. Conversely, wolves persist on such tasks. While dogs’ ‘looking back’ behaviour has been used as an example of socio-cognitive advancement, an alternative explanation is that pet dogs show less persistence on independent tasks more generally.

In this study, pet dogs, shelter dogs and wolves were given up to three opportunities to open a solvable puzzle box: when subjects were with a neutral human caretaker, alone and when encouraged by the human. Wolves were more persistent and more successful on this task than dogs, with 80% average success rate for wolves versus a 5% average success rate for dogs in both the human-in and alone conditions. Dogs showed increased contact with the puzzle box during the encouragement condition, but only a moderate increase in problem-solving success. Social sensitivity appears to play an important role in pet and shelter dogs’ willingness to engage in problem-solving behaviour, which could suggest generalized dependence on, or deference to, human action.