Texas hummingbirds 2017 highlights video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Jewels Of The Davis Mountains: 2017 West Texas Hummingbird Cam Highlights

14 December 2017

From North America’s smallest breeding bird—the Calliope Hummingbird—to the comparably colossal Blue-throated Hummingbird, relive the rich diversity of tiny fliers (and more) that visited the West Texas hummingbird cam in 2017.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky Pet Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Advertisements

Six-year-old Muslim Down’s Syndrome boy a ‘terrorist’?!


This video says about itself:

26 May 2016

Attacks on Muslims are on the rise, and a group in Dallas, Texas is arming up in fear of a Muslim uprising.

By Rachel Roberts, 3 December 2017:

Teacher reports six-year-old Muslim boy with Down’s Syndrome to police for ‘terrorism

Mohammad Suleiman ‘cannot speak at all’, his parents say

A supply teacher‘s call to police about a six-year-old Muslim boy with Down’s Syndrome led to his family being investigated for terrorism.

Officers launched the probe after six-year-old Mohammad Suleiman allegedly kept repeating the words “Allah” and “boom” [in] class.

His parents from the Texan city of Pearland, around 20 miles south of Houston, have claimed this cannot be true because “he doesn’t speak at all” and has “the mental capacity of a one-year-old.”

The boy’s father said the family been through hell after becoming the subjects of both a police and social services investigation.

“The last three or four weeks have been the hardest of my life,” Maher Suleiman told the Fox26 news channel. “My wife and kids were crying a few days ago and I told them everything is fine.

“Mohammad was born with Down’s Syndrome Chromosome 21. He needs care all the time.”

He added: “They claim that he’s a terrorist. This is so stupid, this is discrimination actually. It’s not implied discrimination, it’s a hundred per cent discrimination.”

Sutherland Springs, Texas massacre, why?


This 6 November 2017 video from the USA is called 26 Dead In Horrific Mass Shooting In Texas Church.

By Kate Randall in the USA:

Twenty-six dead in Texas church massacre: A society ravaged by pathological violence

7 November 2017

A small town in Texas was the scene of a horrific mass shooting Sunday morning. A lone gunman, wearing black tactical gear and a ballistics vest, and toting what authorities described as an “assault-type rifle,” opened fire at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, population about 700, southeast of San Antonio, killing 26 people.

At least a dozen of the dead were children, one as young as 18 months. Eight members of one family were killed. The grandmother of the shooter’s wife was also killed. Fifteen of the 20 wounded remain in area hospitals, several in critical condition. …

When Americans turned on their televisions or checked their phones or laptops midday Sunday, many shook their heads in disgust at the news of yet another gruesome mass shooting in America. More innocent lives gunned down in what authorities would have us believe are “senseless killings,” with no real explanation provided aside from describing the gunman as someone gripped by “pure evil.”

But do such banal explanations hold up under conditions where these mass shootings continue to occur with regularity and increasing brutality? The Sutherland Springs shooting took place just five weeks after the Las Vegas shooting at a country music festival, the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history, which left 59 dead and 546 injured.

Eight of the 20 deadliest mass shootings in the US have taken place over the past five years (all figures include the perpetrators):

Speaking at a joint press conference with Japanese President [no, Prime Minister] Shinzo Abe in Japan, President Trump stated: “I think that mental health is a problem here. Based on preliminary reports, this was a very deranged individual with a lot of problems over a very long period of time … but this isn’t about guns.” …

But such statements are cold comfort to the Sutherland Springs families who are grieving and offer little by way of explanation to the public at large as to why such atrocities continue to happen. Of course, the perpetrators of these mass shootings are invariably deranged individuals. How could it be otherwise? What “sane” person would gun down innocent people at a church, a university, an elementary school, or a music festival? But there are always deeper societal issues at work in the lives and actions of these individuals that drive them to lash out with violence.

In his 26 years, Devin Patrick Kelley had already participated in his share of violence before Sunday’s incident. A spokeswoman for the Air Force confirmed that Kelley, who joined the military after graduating from high school in 2009, was court-martialed in 2012 on two charges of assaulting his first wife and her child. The child reportedly suffered a fractured skull.

He was confined for a year, given a bad conduct discharge, and reduced in rank to an airman basic. Although this discharge should have barred him from purchasing weapons, the Air Force never informed the FBI of the charges against him.

Kelley’s first wife divorced him in 2012 and he remarried in Texas in 2014. Authorities say there was a “domestic situation” between him and his in-laws that led to the assault. His mother-in-law was a parishioner at the Sutherland Springs church, and she had reportedly received threatening text messages from him, although she was not present at the church on Sunday.

NBC also reported that two of Kelley’s ex-girlfriends said he stalked them after breakups. A search of criminal records in Comal County, Texas, where he lived, found a record of only minor violations, including driving with an expired registration, speeding, and driving without insurance.

While Kelley lived in Colorado Springs, Colorado for a short time in 2014, he was arrested on an animal cruelty charge, according to police records, involving beating a dog with both fists and punching it in the head and chest, a witness said. He paid a fine in that case.

But the question remains, what kind of society molds such an individual, willing to settle a seemingly petty score by carrying out mass murder? One must first look to the US military. For Kelley and other young men and women, the US has been in a perpetual state of war—in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Africa and elsewhere—for their entire lives. The current occupant of the White House is threatening the obliteration of an entire nation and people in North Korea.

Kelley—faced with the prospect of unemployment, a low-paying job in the service industry or the precarious “gig” economy—chose to enlist in the military upon graduation from high school. He likely absorbed the military’s jingoism and “America First” mentality, but the Air Force eventually spit him out with a bad conduct discharge after he abused his family.

Thousands of young people have also been drawn into the abuse of opioids, spurred on by the lack of job opportunities and the predatory drug companies. Opioid overdoses claimed the lives of about 64,000 Americans last year, a jump of 21 percent over the previous year, according to new figures release by the Centers for Disease Control.

And while the Trump administration claims that not one cent in additional funding can be provided for the opioid “public health emergency,” the White House and the Republicans are pushing through a massive tax cut for corporations that will lower the corporate tax rate from the current 35 percent to 20 percent.

Increasing numbers of older workers are unable to retire, and are working into their 70s to maintain their health insurance and enough money to pay their rent or mortgages. For the first time since 1993, at the height of the AIDS epidemic, life expectancy actually declined between 2014 and 2015.

It is no wonder that a new report from the American Psychological Association, “Stress in America: The State of Our Nation,” reveals that nearly two thirds of Americans (63 percent) are “really, really, really stressed” about the future of the United States. This stress about the future of America supersedes even the usual suspects: money (62 percent) and work (61 percent).

Other common sources of stress reported by those surveyed include social divisiveness (59 percent), health care (43 percent), the economy (35 percent), potential wars/conflicts with other countries (30 percent), unemployment and low wages (22 percent), and climate change and environmental issues (21 percent).

Despite these very real concerns among ordinary Americans, the two big-business parties have no interest in addressing issues of social inequality and the struggles of workers and young people on a daily basis to survive and provide for their families.

The mainstream media and cable news networks took some time away from talk of “Russian meddling” in the 2016 elections to provide some sensationalist and uninformative coverage of the Sutherland Springs church massacre. But this coverage was peppered with new “revelations” about Russia and Vladimir Putin’s intervention into every aspect of American political life. It would not be shocking to hear one of the media’s talking heads suggest that Putin may have somehow been responsible for Sunday’s shooting tragedy.

And take a look at how quickly right-wing conspiracy theorists tied Kelley to “antifa terror” before anyone knew anything. [HuffPost]

AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY How America’s mass shooting crisis is rooted in its domestic violence problem. The Texas church shooter’s ex-wife said she lived in constant fear of Devin Patrick Kelley. Tearful church members reunited a week after the tragedy to worship in a baseball field. And the church itself has been transformed into a memorial for the victims. [HuffPost]

Texas church mass murderer bought weapons legally


This 6 November 2017 video from the USA says about itself:

TYT Politics’ Emma Vigeland gives the latest on the massacre on Sunday. A gunman killed at least 26 people at a church service in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

From the Washington Post in the USA:

The Air Force says it failed to follow procedures, allowing Texas church shooter to obtain firearms

The Air Force says it failed to follow policies for alerting federal law enforcement about Devin P. Kelley’s violent past, enabling the former service member, who killed at least 26 churchgoers Sunday in Sutherland Springs, Tex., to obtain firearms before the shooting rampage.

Kelley should have been barred from purchasing firearms and body armor because of his domestic violence conviction in 2014 while serving at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. Kelley was sentenced to a year in prison and kicked out of the military with a bad conduct discharge following two counts of domestic abuse against his wife and a child, according to Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek.

“Initial information indicates that Kelley’s domestic violence offense was not entered into the National Criminal Information Center database,” Stefanek said in a statement released Monday. …

Firearms retailer Academy Sports also confirmed Monday that Kelley purchased two weapons from its stores after passing federal background checks this year and last. …

A separate law prohibits violent offenders from purchasing body armor, which Kelley was seen wearing during the rampage. …

Lawmakers called on Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to review military investigative organizations and determine how many convicted former service members the military has failed to properly document for the FBI. …

[Former Army lawyer and professor at the South Texas College of Law in Houston] Corn said it appears there is confusion within the Air Force, and other military branches, about only reporting violent crimes that result in dishonorable discharges, which are more severe punishments under military law than the bad conduct discharge Kelley received….

Sky Gerrond, a former Air Force security operations officer who spent seven years in military law enforcement, said a dishonorable discharge may have been a more appropriate punishment for the severity of Kelley’s crime. Had the Air Force court system handed down that punishment, Gerrond said, it is more probable the details of Kelley’s conviction would have reached the FBI’s database.

From the New York Times in the USA:

Texas Gunman Broke Child’s Skull and Assaulted Wife in Troubled Life

By ALAN BLINDER, DAVE PHILIPPS and RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr.

NOV. 6, 2017

NEW BRAUNFELS, Tex. — He beat his wife, cracked his toddler stepson’s skull and was kicked out of the military. He drove away friends, drew attention from the police and abused his dog. Before Devin P. Kelley entered a rural Texas church with a military-style rifle, killing at least 26 people on Sunday, he led a deeply troubled life in which few in his path escaped unscathed.

In 2012, while stationed at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico, Mr. Kelley was charged with assault, according to Air Force records, which said he had repeatedly struck, kicked and choked his first wife beginning just months into their marriage, and hit his stepson’s head with what the Air Force described as “a force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm.” …

Some neighbors said they sometimes heard gunfire from [Devin Kelley’s] property. But in this stretch of the Texas hill country, that is hardly cause for alarm.

One neighbor, who would give his name only as Doug, said he heard shots fired at the Kelley property that would set his dogs barking.

“My dogs, they would be outside, and we would hear, ‘Bim-bam, bim-bam, bim-bam, bim-bam,’” he said.

THE AIR FORCE FAILED TO ENTER TEXAS CHURCH SHOOTER’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RECORD IN U.S. DATABASE Which could have kept Devin Patrick Kelley, who had been convicted of assaulting his wife and stepchild, from buying a gun and shooting 26 people to death Sunday. Half of the people killed in the attack were children — including one who was 18 months old. Eight of the victims were from the same family. President Donald Trump said that gun control would have left “hundreds more dead” in that church. And here’s how churches and other soft targets can train for a shooting. [HuffPost]

Military veteran’s mass murder in Texas, USA


Devin Kelley, perpetrator of Texas massacre

From Huffington Post in the USA today:

At least 26 are dead and 20 others injured after a gunman opened fire at a small Baptist church in rural Texas on Sunday morning. The ages of the wounded and dead range from 5 to 72 years.

Multiple media reports identified the suspect as 26-year-old Devin Patrick Kelley. His motive remains unknown.

Kelley was previously a member of the United States Air Force, serving at a base in New Mexico.

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas ― More than 100 people gathered outside the post office here on Sunday night, just blocks away from the First Baptist Church where a lone gunman killed 26 members of this tight-knit community on Sunday morning. It was the worst mass killing in the state’s history.

“Who are we going to be tomorrow?” Stephen Curry, a pastor from a nearby church, asked the crowd. “We’re going to be people of love.”

“Amen!” the audience exclaimed. …

Kelley was previously a United States Air Force member who served in logistics readiness at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, from 2010 until his bad conduct discharge in 2014. He was court-martialed in 2012 for assault on his spouse and assault on their child.

It is reported that mass murderer Kelley ‘was not a terrorist‘. I suspect that has something to do with Kelley being white and not a Muslim. Before it was known that non-Muslim Kelley was the perpetrator, nazi Internet site The Daily Stormer already blamed Muslims. Not just the Daily Stormer nazis, also ‘mainstream’ media like the Murdoch empire, and not just the Murdoch empire, tend to blame Muslims even if perpetrators are racist Islamophobes like Breivik in Norway or Alexandre Bissonnette in Quebec.

However, if a perpetrator of a bloodbath happens to be a Muslim, then corporate media and Donald Trump tend to blame Muslims in general. If the perpetrator happens to be a white male, like in the Las Vegas massacre and now the Texas church massacre, then they, correctly, don’t blame white men in general.

Devin Patrick Kelley is not just a white man, but also apparently a pious Christian, as he taught at a Bible school. Should we now blame Christians in general wrongly, like Muslims are blamed in general wrongly? No, even though among Christians there are violent individuals and violent groups, like in most religions.

Devin Patrick Kelley is not just a Christian white man, but also an armed forces veteran. Should soldiers or ex-soldiers in general be blamed for such atrocities? No; but the tensions of United States perpetual wars do often cause PTSD or other mental health problems in soldiers or veterans. Which may cause domestic violence; like in Kelley’s case. Or murder; also like in Kelley’s case. And in the case of other non-Muslim veterans and soldiers, like in the Florida airport massacre. Or in the case of the Muslim serving soldier in another massacre in Texas, at Fort Hood military base; which was blamed widely on Islam instead of the PTSD cause in corporate media.

By Trévon Austin in the USA:

Over 25 killed in mass shooting in Texas

6 November 2017

At least 25 people have been killed, and many more injured, in a mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, a small town about 30 miles east of San Antonio. Devin Kelley, a 26-year-old male, walked into the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs and opened fire, marking one of the deadliest mass shootings in American history, and the largest in Texas history.

The shooting wounded nearly everyone inside the church that attended the service, about 50 people, in a town of just a few hundred. Among those killed, 23 people died inside the church, two outside the building, and one person died after being transported to a hospital, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety. The ages of the wounded and dead ranged from 5 to 72, authorities said.

Freeman Martin, regional director for the Texas Department of Public Safety, said the shooter was dressed in all black, tactical-type gear, when he opened fire on the church. “He was seen dressed in all black. He started firing at the church,” he said. “He moved to the right side of the church and continued to fire, then he went in the church.” He was “dressed all in black tactical type gear and was wearing a ballistic vest.”

According to Guadalupe County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Robert Murphy, the shooter was killed after a brief chase. It is not known whether or not Kelley shot himself, but one report claims that a citizen inside of the church confronted Kelley.

He “grabbed his rifle and confronted the suspect,” who was armed with a “Ruger AR assault type rifle,” according to heavy.com. The unidentified citizen was then reported to have chased Kelley, who attempted to flee in a vehicle and ran off the road. Kelley was found dead in the vehicle with a gunshot wound.

“We don’t know if it was a self-inflicted gunshot wound or if he was shot by our local resident who engaged him with gunfire,” authorities said.

A witness, a cashier at a gas station across the street from the church, told CNN she heard about 20 shots being fired in quick succession while a church service was underway around 11:30 a.m. local time.

David Flores, a local resident, told CNN, “My dad saw the gunman run into the church building and then he heard shots and saw people running.” Flores told CNN. “People covered in blood and screaming. It was pandemonium everywhere.”

According to both witness accounts and official reports, pregnant women and young children were among the victims in the shooting, including the pastor’s 14-year-old daughter Annabelle, and a two-year-old toddler, according to reports by KNES5.

“There were several children injured,” Flores told CNN. “I know three, personally, who are in critical condition.”

In the aftermath of the shooting, FBI authorities searched Kelley’s Facebook profile and found a posted picture of a rifle Kelley called a “bad bitch.” His profile picture showed two children as well. His Facebook account has since been removed.

According to the Daily Beast, “Kelley was married and Kelley’s mother-in-law listed a P.O. box in Sutherland Springs as a mailing address. San Antonio police reportedly raided Kelley’s home on Sunday evening,” and “he briefly taught at a summer Bible school.”

Authorities have also revealed that Kelley was part of the US Air Force after high school, from 2010 to 2014. CBS News reported that “Kelley is a former U.S. Air Force member who served from 2010 to 2014. He was dishonorably discharged and court martialed in May 2014.”

The tragedy that unfolded Sutherland Springs marks the 307th mass shooting—defined as an incident in which four or more people are shot or killed—in the United States this year, according to information compiled by the Gun Violence Archive.

An article published by the Guardian after the mass shooting in Las Vegas reported that 1,516 mass shootings had occurred within the last 1,735 days, with 1,719 killed and 6,510 injured. Using data from Gun Violence Archive, the Guardian concluded “there is a mass shooting … every nine out of 10 days on average.”

AT LEAST 26 DEAD IN SHOOTING AT TEXAS BAPTIST CHURCH SUNDAY And 20 more are injured. Shooting suspect Devin Patrick Kelley reportedly began firing on the congregation with a Ruger AR assault-type rifle and was found dead of a gunshot wound after a car chase. A former member of the Air Force, he was court-martialed in 2012 for assaulting his spouse and their child. The victims in Sunday’s shooting ranged in age from 5 to 72, including the pastor’s daughter and an 8-months pregnant woman. “I don’t think they could have escaped. You’ve got your pews on either side,” Wilson County Sheriff Joe Tackitt Jr. said Sunday. The Baptist church carnage was the 307th mass shooting in the U.S. this year, and such shootings are becoming more common and more deadly. President Donald Trump called the shooting a “mental health problem at the highest level.” [HuffPost]

So, now Donald Trump at last discovers the mental health issue, now that the culprit is a white Christian man. While completely disregarding it on earlier occasions which he abused for stoking Islamophobia to promote his ‘war on terror‘ from which he profits financially personally.

Here’s a list of shootings at churches over the years.

Remember that viral photo of the bicyclist who flipped off Trump’s motorcade? Turns out she got fired for that.

President Kennedy murdered, some documents released, some still secret


This video from the USA says about itself:

Rush to Judgment (1966)

A 1966 film by [President] J[ohn] F[itzgerald] K[ennedy] Assassination Researcher Mark Lane. In this documentary key eyewitness accounts just three years after the assassination.

By Eric London in the USA:

27 October 2017

Bowing to pressure from the Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Trump administration delayed the release of thousands of documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in November 1963 in an announcement last night.

An additional batch of thousands of less sensitive documents related to the assassination was released online last night at 7:30 pm, in accordance with a 1992 law that scheduled documents for release this year.

The New York Times reported, however, that “following a chaotic last-minute campaign by intelligence agencies lobbying for selected redactions, Mr. Trump agreed to postpone the disclosure of other documents while officials screen them again for sensitive information.”

By Phillip Francis in the USA today:

JFK’s assassination was conspired by [right-wingers in then South] Vietnam?

Richard Nixon during Watergate

Nixon had some theories of his own. | Wikimedia Commons

In a released document from the Rockefeller Commision, a testimony from then-CIA Director Richard Helms in 1975 outlines a conspiracy theory held by Richard Nixon. Nixon believed that the coup and death of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem and that [sentence sic] the CIA was responsible for the whole thing. Nixon asserted that the assassination of JFK was revenge for that act. …

[Helms said] President Johnson used to go around saying that the reason President Kennedy was assassinated was that he had assassinated President Diem and this was just … justice.

By Barry Grey in the USA:

Newly released documents point to state cover-up and complicity in assassination of John F. Kennedy

28 October 2017

Information contained in nearly 2,900 previously classified documents released Thursday concerning the assassination of President John F. Kennedy further undermines the official narrative of a lone killer and points to a cover-up and complicity on the part of forces within the US intelligence agencies.

What are generally deemed the most sensitive—and potentially incriminating—documents were withheld, as President Donald Trump acceded to extraordinary pressure from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation and delayed their release.

These 300 documents, consisting of thousands of pages of material, include an extensive file on the head of the CIA office in Dallas at the time of the November 22, 1963 killing; a dossier on a prominent Dallas businessman who conferred with nightclub owner Jack Ruby just before Ruby shot and killed the accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald; files on two anti-Castro Cuban terrorists involved in mass murder; documents concerning Oswald’s six-day trip to Mexico City and meetings with Russian and Cuban officials seven weeks before the Kennedy assassination; and information on Watergate burglars and longtime CIA operatives E. Howard Hunt and James McCord.

From the moment the 35th president was killed by a volley of shots as his caravan drove past Dealey Plaza in Dallas up to the present time, there has been a systematic effort to keep from public view critical facts pointing to political motives underlying the murder and to dismiss all questioning of the 1964 Warren Commission Report as “conspiracy theories.”

The commission, announced by Lyndon Johnson a week after Kennedy’s assassination and headed by the chief justice of the Supreme Court, Earl Warren, concluded that Oswald, acting alone and using a mail order rifle, killed Kennedy by firing three shots from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository building, which overlooks Dealey Plaza. The commission said Oswald had no connection to US intelligence agencies or other parties.

The American public, with good reason, has never accepted this narrative. A recent poll by FiveThirtyEight and SurveyMonkey found that only 33 percent of Americans believe the assassination was the work of only one person, while 61 percent believe others were involved. A 1979 report issued by the House Select Committee on Assassinations seconded this view, concluding that Kennedy “was probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy.”

Kennedy’s assassination had a traumatic effect on the American public and continues to haunt the popular imagination. It came at a time of mounting crisis for US imperialism both at home and abroad, signaling the beginning of the end of the United States’ post-World War II global economic and geopolitical hegemony. Only weeks before his death, Kennedy sanctioned the coup that overthrew South Vietnamese President Diem, leading to his murder, an event that marked a nodal point in the escalation of the US intervention in Vietnam.

Washington’s mounting economic contradictions were reflected in a worsening balance of payments crisis and gold drain, which would lead eight years later to the collapse of the Bretton Woods monetary system and the ending of dollar-gold convertibility.

Domestically, the ruling class faced a growing civil rights insurgency and a militant working class determined to defend and extend its postwar economic gains. The elimination of Kennedy was an inflection point in the transition of US ruling class domestic policy from social reform and relative class compromise to class war and political reaction.

The documents released on Thursday make clear that both the FBI and the CIA were well aware of Oswald’s activities and were closely tracking him in the period leading up to the assassination. Yet they failed to warn the Secret Service, tasked with protecting the president, about the former Marine, turned expatriate living in the Soviet Union, turned active member of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee.

One of the more spectacular documents concerns 1975 testimony by Richard Helms, the CIA director under presidents Johnson and Nixon, to the President’s Commission on CIA Activities, which was headed by then-Vice President Nelson Rockefeller. A lawyer for the commission is quoted asking Helms: “Is there any information involved with the assassination of President Kennedy which in any way shows that Lee Harvey Oswald was in some way a CIA agent or agent…?” At that point the document breaks off, without Helms’ reply.

Other material documents the fact that the intelligence agencies were closely monitoring Oswald’s movements. One document shows that the CIA intercepted Oswald speaking to a Russian KGB agent in Mexico City on September 28, 1963. Another, dated October 25, a month before the assassination, is from the New Orleans office of the FBI. In it, the FBI notes Oswald’s involvement in the New Orleans chapter of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee and discusses the agency’s contacts with Cuban sources concerning Oswald.

A number of documents shed light on the systematic nature of the cover-up, which began virtually the moment the shots rang out on Dealey Plaza. One is a memo from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover dictated the evening of November 24, 1963, shortly after Jack Ruby shot and killed Oswald, before live TV cameras, as the Dallas police were leading the handcuffed suspect down a corridor in the police headquarters building.

Hoover says, “Last night we received a call in our Dallas office from a man talking in a calm voice and saying he was a member of a committee organized to kill Oswald.” He notes that he informed the Dallas police of the call and insisted that they take precautions to prevent an attack on Oswald. Furious that the accused assassin was killed before a confession had been extracted from him, Hoover writes of the need for “something issued so that we can convince the public that Oswald is the real assassin.” This was written, of course, before any serious investigation of the killing had begun.

Lyndon Johnson, who told Earl Warren that his commission had a “patriotic mission” to stamp out “dangerous rumors” of state involvement in the assassination, was himself convinced that Kennedy was the victim of a conspiracy. One document in the trove released Thursday shows Richard Helms telling the Rockefeller Commission in 1975 that Johnson “used to go around saying that the reason President Kennedy was assassinated was that he had assassinated President Diem.”

In its account of the released documents, the Washington Post writes: “The CIA publicly acknowledged in 2014 that John McCone, its director at the time of the assassination, participated in a ‘benign cover-up,’ according to a paper by agency historian David Robarge. His article said McCone was ‘complicit in keeping incendiary and diversionary issues off the commission’s agenda.’ He wrote that McCone did not tell the commission about CIA-Mafia plots to kill Castro, some of which had been planned at the Mexico City station.”

There is ample material in the newly released papers concerning the criminal activities of the US government in the period leading up to the assassination. A 1975 document from the Rockefeller Commission speaks of Attorney General Robert Kennedy telling the FBI that the CIA considered approaching Chicago mobster Sam Giancana to have the mafia go to Cuba and kill Fidel Castro for $150,000. Schemes to assassinate Castro included the use of gunmen, poison pills, a skin-diving suit contaminated with a disabling fungus and tuberculosis, and a “booby-trap spectacular seashell.”

Behind the public face of the Kennedy administration, marked by soaring rhetoric about the defense of democracy around the world, both John and Robert Kennedy had a particular fascination with assassination plots, particularly against Castro. It was less than three years since the Bay of Pigs debacle, in which President Kennedy signed off on the CIA scheme to use Cuban anti-Castro expatriates to invade the island, murder Castro and install a US puppet regime.

Despite the failure of the plot and Kennedy’s fury over the CIA’s false assurances and incompetence, his administration remained mired in the swamp of anticommunist adventurers and terrorists. Two of the CIA’s anti-Castro allies, Luis Posada and Orlando Bosch, were implicated in the blowing up of a Cuban commercial airliner and death of 73 innocent passengers in 1976. Posada escaped from prison in Venezuela with the aid of an anti-Castro group with close ties to the Reagan administration. He was subsequently implicated in terrorist bombings in Cuba in the late 1990s.

Other illegal activities described in the newly released documents include the FBI’s relentless wiretapping of Martin Luther King, Jr., whom Hoover considered to be part of a world communist conspiracy, and FBI spying on Mark Lane, a liberal lawyer and author of a number of books debunking the Warren Commission Report.

The US media and the Kennedy assassination documents: “Move along, nothing to see here”: here.