Texas African American mother calls police, gets arrested


This video from the USA says about itself:

White Cop Tackles Black Mom After She Calls For Help

23 December 2016

A cop in Fort Worth Texas has been placed on limited duty after he responded to a woman’s call that her 7-year-old son was assaulted by a neighbor. Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, Ben Mankiewicz and Brett Erlich hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

A white cop has been placed on restricted duty Thursday after video surfaced showing him tackling and arresting a black woman who had called police to report her child had been attacked.

The 6-minute, profanity-laced clip posted on Facebook shows the exchange between the woman, Jacqueline Craig, and an unidentified police officer from the Fort Worth Police Department. The cop was responding to Craig’s call to police that a white neighbor had just grabbed her son by the neck for ignoring his order for the 7-year-old boy to pick up a piece of garbage on the ground.

“He defied him, so that’s why he did it,” Craig is heard telling the officer. “So I have a problem with that. My son is 7 years old. You don’t have the right to grab him, choke him.” …

Craig, her daughter and their cousin, Brea Hymond, were all arrested.

Read more here.

Keep ‘your fat mouth shut’: Trump-backing school principal under fire for attacking Texas cuffed-mom: here.

Texas hummingbirds 2016 highlights


This video from the USA says about itself:

West Texas Hummingbird Highlights 2016

22 November 2016

With the 2016 season of the West Texas Hummingbird Cam winding down, we wanted to share some of our favorite moments from this year on cam.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers.

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

For the past 10 years, researchers from West Texas Avian Research have been banding hummingbirds at this site and others throughout the Trans-Pecos region of Texas to study the status and distribution of hummingbirds throughout the poorly known region.

The active banding of hummingbirds continues (off camera) at this site in the Davis Mountains, and from time to time you may hear researchers working in the background. Some common species in you may hear vocalizing include Western Scrub Jays, Acorn Woodpeckers, and Canyon Wrens (among others).

Thanks to West Texas Avian Research for their enthusiasm and support for hosting the camera at this remote research site, and to cam sponsor Perky-Pet®.

Acorn woodpecker’s balance problems at Texas, USA feeder


This video from the USA says about itself:

21 November 2016

An Acorn Woodpecker sneaks some nectar while only barely hanging on.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Hummingbird, bee share nectar in Texas


This video from the USA says about itself:

Hummingbird and Honey Bee Share Some Nectar – Nov. 4, 2016

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Amethyst-throated hummingbird, first ever in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

18 October 2016

The first-ever Amethyst-throated Hummingbird spotted in the United States spent the afternoon sipping from the Perky-Pet feeder on our West Texas Hummingbird Cam, making multiple visits throughout the evening. The mega-rarity was first spotted by the cam host, who also documented its presence with still images.

Watch live at http://AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers

The West Texas Hummingbird Feeder Cam is nestled in the mountains outside Fort Davis, Texas, at an elevation of over 6200 feet. This site hosts a total of 24 Perky-Pet® Grand Master hummingbird feeders, and during peak migration can attract hundreds of hummingbirds from a dozen species that are migrating through the arid mountains.

Texas hummingbirds, identification video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Hummingbird Identification Video – Oct. 7, 2016

Want to learn more about how to identify the hummingbirds that you see on the West Texas Hummingbird Cam? Let us help you out! Watch the video and use the identification tools that are listed for each of the species in this video.

Watch all the action live at AllAboutBirds.org/TexasHummers to practice your new skills!

Male and Female Black-chinned – These slender hummers are comparatively small with dull, metallic green backs, flat foreheads and long bills. Males are identified by an iridescent purple band present underneath a black chin. Females often have a grayish crown with dull gray underparts.

Immature Male Anna’s – These rare visitors are medium-large sized and stocky with a short black bill. Immature males often exhibit a throat patch and face that is speckled with iridescent rosy-pink. Notice the lack of any cinnamon wash on the body or rufous on the tail? This distinguishes the juvenile male Anna’s Hummingbird from Rufous Hummingbirds.

Male Magnificent – The iridescent purple crown and equally striking green gorget easily distinguish the large, long-billed male Magnificent Hummingbird from the other visitors on camera.

Male Calliope – These tiny birds are the smallest you’ll see north of Mexico in North America. The male Calliope exhibits a streaky magenta and white throat pattern combined with green upperparts and short, thin bill.

Male and Female Rufous – The male Rufous Hummingbird is named for its color. The brilliant orange face, sides and back, combined with the vivid red-bronze gorget set these pugnacious individuals apart from the rest. Females are equipped with an iridescent reddish spot in the center of the throat. These medium-sized female hummingbirds have buffy rufous sides, green heads and backs, and whitish bellies.