Abstract expressionist painting in Cornwall


This video says about itself:

21 July 2016

While Abstract Expressionism was mostly associated with New York City and its vibrant arts scene, it also had an outpost in St Ives, a small coastal town in Cornwall, England. Julian Stallabrass speaks to curator Chris Stephens about the art of two of its main protagonists, art critic and painter Patrick Heron and artist Peter Lanyon. How did their work incorporate the movements key themes of abstraction, landscape and the sublime?

One stolen Dutch painting will return to museum


Nieuwstraat in Hoorn (1784) - Izaak Ouwater (recent photo)

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Again painting stolen from Westfries Museum found

Today, 16:09

The West Frisian Museum in Hoorn has once again found one of 24 paintings that were stolen from the museum in 2005. It is Isaac Ouwater‘s Nieuwstraat in Hoorn.

A Ukrainian delivered the 1784 painting today to the Dutch embassy in Kiev. According to the Westfries Museum the man had bought the painting, with authenticity certificate, in good faith.

The buyer is also willing to give back the work to the West Frisian Museum, without conditions. The painting is badly damaged and will not any soon be shown after restoration, according to a spokesman.

Major museum looting

On the night of 9 to January 10, 2005, the painting was stolen along with 23 other paintings and 70 pieces of silverware. According to the museum the loot was the heart of their 17th- and 18th-century collection.

It took years before a trace was found of the stolen art. … Later all the paintings proved to be in Ukraine.

After research by the museum it turned out that the key men in this art theft were Oleh Yaroslavovych Tyahnybok, the leader of the neo-nazi Svoboda party; and Valentyn Oleksandrovych Nalyvaichenko, until recently the boss of the Ukrainian secret police, now a right-wing member of parliament.

Among other things with the help of an art detective then four of the stolen paintings were identified. Of the remaining twenty works now this one has been found. …

It is not yet clear when the recovered paintings will return to the museum in Hoorn. The Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security has already submitted an application to the authorities in Ukraine.

Hieronymus Bosch exhibition, last weekend


This video says about itself:

30 November 2015

Het Noordbrabants Museum presents: Jheronimus Bosch – Visions of a genius. From 13th February to 8th May. Twenty panels and triptychs and nineteen drawings are making it the largest exhibition of Hieronymus Bosch in the Netherlands ever. The exhibition is a highpoint of the National Event Year Jheronimus Bosch 500 in 2016.

That exhibition of works by the famous painter Hieronymus Bosch in Den Bosch, the city where he lived, in the Netherlands, is almost over. This weekend is the last weekend.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that about 400,000 tickets were sold, to visitors from 81 countries.

About 25% of all visitors were from foreign countries. Most from Belgium (7%), Germany (6%) and Britain (4%). Also from countries like South Africa, the USA, Argentina, China and Russia.

Flowers, threatened birds on murals


This 2014 video is from Lisse town in the Netherlands. Artist Judith van der Meer made a mural there, depicting flowers. Lisse is a center for bulb flower growing.

And this 2015 video shows Ms van der Meer making a mural depicting flowers and sports people in a tunnel in Teylingen local authority.

And this 2013 video shows Ms van der Meer making a mural depicting flowers, boats and other items at Sassenheim railway station.

Godwit mural

In April 2016, Ms van der Meer finished her mural at the Ridderspoortunnel in Leiden. The part on the photo depicts a black-tailed godwit. The red around the bird on the picture symbolizes that black-tailed godwits are a threatened species. The Ridderspoortunnel mural the biodiversity in the area. It also depicts a garganey, buttercup, green hawker dragonfly, smooth newt and a ruff.

Caravaggio, Schalcken paintings rediscovered (?)


This video says about itself:

Baroque Caravaggio Project

17 February 2012

Description of Caravaggio‘s paintings:

Judith Beheading Holofernes

Martyrdom of Saint Matthew

The Seven Works of Mercy

Caravaggio depicted Judith Beheading Holofernes twice. One version is well-known and mentioned in the video. The other version appeared to be lost. Until, maybe, now.

From the BBC today:

Painting thought to be Caravaggio masterpiece found in French loft

A painting that may be by the Italian master Caravaggio and worth £94m ($135m) has been found in the loft of a house in southern France.

It was found in Toulouse two years ago and passed to art expert Eric Turquin, who says it is a version of the 1599 work, Judith Beheading Holofernes.

He said it was discovered by the owners when they investigated a roof leak.

The French government has placed a bar on the work leaving the country for 30 months while tests are carried out.

The work, which depicts the Biblical heroine Judith beheading an Assyrian general,

rather: Babylonian

is thought to have gone missing about 100 years after it was painted.

Another version of it, which was also thought to be lost before its rediscovery in 1950, hangs in Rome’s National Gallery of Ancient Art.

Experts at Paris’ Louvre Museum are examining the work to try to establish its creator, though Turquin said there would “never be a consensus” on who painted it.

If it proves to be genuine, the French Government will be given the first chance to purchase the work.

Caravaggio – whose real name was Michelangelo Merisi – was born in 1571 or 1573 and had a violent and chaotic life, dying in mysterious circumstances at the age of 38.

He pioneered the Baroque painting technique known as chiaroscuro, in which light and shadow are sharply contrasted.

He was famed for starting brawls, often ended up in jail, and even killed a man.

He was allegedly on his way to Rome to seek a pardon when he died, having spent the last few years of his life fleeing justice in southern Italy.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that a 1667 painting by Dutch seventeenth century painter Godfried Schalcken has been found again, after having been lost.

Young woman offering a wafer, by Godfried Schalcken

The painting is called Young woman offering a wafer.

Rembrandt self-portrait exhibition in England


This video says about itself:

20 January 2016

I’m down at the Ulster Museum to see Rembrandt‘s final self portrait before he died aged 63. You could say that these self portraits were the selfies of his day!

This painting represents one of his finest works. It is on a tour of the outer reaches of the UK so that folk unable to travel to London’s National Gallery might have an opportunity to see it. It remains at the Ulster Museum until early February.

Rembrandt (1606–1669) is perhaps the best-loved and most admired painter of the seventeenth century. Born in Leiden, he spent most of his life in Amsterdam, where he worked for a wide circle of wealthy and influential patrons. Rembrandt’s reputation was built on his skill in producing ambitious and dazzling biblical scenes, history paintings and portraits, yet it is through a remarkable series of self-portraits that we feel closest to the painter’s inner thoughts and character.

Rembrandt produced some 80 self-portraits – paintings, drawings and prints- over the course of his 40-year career. No artist before Rembrandt, and only a very few since, have made self-portraiture such a significant part of their life’s work. Self Portrait at the Age of 63, painted in the final year of the artist’s life, is among the very last works he finished. It is a work of sheer virtuosity: proof, if ever it were needed, that with maturity his talent had only become all the more profound.

Self Portrait At The Age Of 63, normally on show at the National Gallery in London, will be the main attraction in a new exhibition at the Ulster Museum.

Anne Stewart, curator of fine art with National Museums Northern Ireland, said: ” One of his most famous self-portraits, this incredible work of art is considered one of his most important and poignant works.

“There is an intensity and pride about the painting, as well as deep pain and sadness. There is a strong sense that this was a self-portrait by someone who knew he was close to the end of his life.”

Some of the Ulster Museum’s own collection of old masters, Dutch paintings from the 17th century will also be on display, including works by Salomon van Ruysdael, Jan Symonsz Pynas, Jan van der Heyden and Nicolaes Maes.

Belfast is the first stop on the National Gallery Masterpiece Tour which aims to bring some of the world’s most famous paintings to a wider audience.

By Philip Norton in Britain:

Facing up to questions of mortality

Saturday 9th April 2016

PHILIP NORTON recommends an intriguing exhibition of a Rembrandt painting

Rembrandt: Self-portrait at the Age of 63
Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal
5/5

VISITING this exhibition is quite the opposite of the dreaded school trip to an art gallery.

No traipsing through room after room of dark brown paintings with ropes to dent curiosity and a monotony of gilt frames captive under spotlights. Just a single picture, in a darkened room, the hessian walls painted with layers of midnight-blue emulsion.

A Rembrandt self-portrait is the last of three paintings to be chosen from the National Gallery’s collection for a mini “masterpiece” tour of the provinces. It began three years ago with Manet’s Execution of Maximilian, followed in 2015 by a Venetian landscape by Canaletto.

The greatest impact of this precisely measured — and privately sponsored — gesture of generosity is the sharp focus lent to the chosen paintings. Seeing the painting alone brings to mind the just-completed work resting on Rembrandt’s easel.

Its restoration of 1967 is still quite evident — there are no layers of smoke and dirt to peer through.

Completed in 1669 it was the last of nearly 40 self-portraits. Much had happened since the round-faced young man of 22 turned into the more determined face of just a year later. By 1634, the painter is clearly enjoying his status with flamboyant velvet beret and a Three Musketeers’ moustache.

This is perhaps Rembrandt’s last carefree self-portrait as by the age of 34, although clearly increasing in stature and painterly confidence, he presents an internalised figure.

Mortality has perhaps become the dominant subject of inquiry.

By the time of this final portrait he was 63 and much has been said about his world-weary look.

It’s true he had suffered much loss. Only his fourth child Titus survived into adulthood. Three previous children were lost to infant illness and their mother Saskia had died from tuberculosis in 1642.

Titus, the subject of a number of Rembrandt’s paintings, was through a complicated arrangement the owner of a company employing Rembrandt. He also died a few months before this self-portrait was completed.

The fatigue of a man who lived beyond his means is evident and it’s true that in 1656 he was forced to sell his prized collection of antiquities to side-step bankruptcy. By 1660, nine years before this last portrait, his house — today the Rembrandt museum in Amsterdam — went too and even his printing press.

These events, until quite recently, shaped our view of the picture. It was thought Rembrandt died in poverty with barely enough money for food and so this painting was seen almost entirely as the reflection of a ruined man.

But it was not the case at all. Historians have since shown he died having built up a second smaller but still significant collection of antiquities and master drawings, enough to fill three rooms of his house. He was never forgotten in his lifetime but was always working and selling pictures.

What was perceived as the look of a ruined man is clearly more a case of acceptance and resignation.

The information panel shows the X-rayed canvas revealing an earlier version in which Rembrandt presented himself in the white beret of the painters studio holding paint brushes.

He had portrayed himself this way before and perhaps most telling, in this final version, is his decision to remove the props.

Rembrandt is no longer the salesman furthering his prospects but a quietly balanced image brimming with the shadows of past certainties. It’s the sort of painting WB Yeats called “the right twigs for an eagle’s nest.”

Runs until May 15, opening times: abbothall.org.uk, then at the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, May 21-July 17, opening times: bristolmuseums.org.uk.

Hieronymus Bosch exhibition, tickets available after all


This video is called Human & Animals by Hieronymus Bosch in The Garden of Earthly Delights.

Today, Dutch NOS TV reports about the Hieronymus Bosch exhibition in Den Bosch city. Earlier, it was said all tickets were sold out.

Now, however, tickets are available again.

This was done by having the museum open from 8am till 1am at night, from 22 April till 6 May.

In the night of 7 May-8 May the exhibition will be open all night. The museum calls that ‘The night of the owl’, because Hieronymus Bosch often depicted owls.