New Dutch wildlife film, interview


This video is about the making of the sequel to the Dutch wildlife film De Nieuwe Wildernis, about the Oostvaardersplassen national park. This sequel is about the Biesbosch national park and other areas in the south-west of the Netherlands.

The video shows an interview with the producer of the film, Ignas van Schaick. It also shows some of the movie’s characters: white stork, three-spined stickleback, sea eagle.

Women without high heels banned at Cannes film festival


This video, recorded in France, says about itself:

EMILY BLUNT Shocked at Cannes High Heel Rule

19 May 2015

The director of the Cannes Film Festival may have put his foot in his mouth! During the film event of the year, women were reportedly being turned away for not wearing high heels and one A-list celebrity isn’t happy. Emily Blunt was shocked to hear the report saying it is very disappointing. The actress added women shouldn’t be wearing high heels anyway in her point of view. Check out the video to see what else Emily Blunt had to say about the rule.

After banning women from wearing miniskirts, and banning women from wearing maxiskirts, and banning women from wearing any type of skirts, and banning women from wearing trousers … now banning women women from wearing shoes without high heels.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Cannes Film Festival rejects women from red-carpet screening of pro-LGBT romance ‘Carol‘ for not wearing high heels

Women, some with medical conditions, ‘turned away for wearing flats

Adam Whitnall

Tuesday 19 May 2015

The Cannes Film Festival is facing an angry backlash after it was accused of turning away women from a red-carpet screening for not wearing high heels.

A number of women in their 50s, some reportedly with medical conditions, were denied access to the showing of Todd Haynes’ entry Carol on Sunday night, according to Screen magazine.

It claimed the women were wearing rhinestone flats at the time – and said that the subject matter of the film itself – a lesbian romance starring Cate Blanchett about fighting against societal norms – added to the outrage of those turned away.

The festival declined to comment on the matter but, Screen reported, did confirm that it was obligatory for all women to wear high heels to red-carpet showings.

The Cannes festival bosses apparently had never heard about women’s health issues with high heels. Nor did they seem to understand that high heels do a lot more damage to their red carpets than other types of shoes :)

On Twitter, the report sparked outrage among users who called Cannes “an outdated embarrassing piece of s*** festival”.

The festival organisers were yet to respond to a request for comment from The Independent.

Vicci Ho, a Cannes regular and former festival programmer, wrote on Twitter that she was “almost turned away” for wearing leather flats, despite doing so because she was suffering ankle problems. She later wrote on the site that the enforcement of the dress code had been “ridiculous this year”: here.

Against the Iraq war, new film We Are Many


This video says about itself:

Do Demonstrations Matter? Amir Amirani and Phyllis Bennis | #GRITtv

13 January 2015

On February 15, 2003, millions of people in over 800 cities on seven continents marched against the impending invasion of Iraq. It was the largest mobilization of people in human history and yet it remains a little-known story. As we approach Martin Luther King Day and think about his legacy of civic resistance, this episode looks at the recent history of the global antiwar movement, and its relevance to today.

A new documentary by this week’s guest, Amir Amirani, tells the story of the mass protests against the Iraq war. From Iraq to Egypt to Syria to today’s protests, the film looks at the legacy of that protest movement and asks, what do mass mobilizations accomplish? Amir Amirani a long time filmmaker for the BBC, tells about his process making the film.

We are also joined by one of the organizers of those historic protests, Phyllis Bennis, an activist, author, and fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies in New York, to talk about the story behind the movement.

This episode also features a profile of the activists behind one of the biggest recent US environmental victories, the struggle that helped lead to New York state’s ban on fracking. And in a commentary, Laura discusses the need for movement unity.

By Ian Sinclair in Britain:

March of the majority

Tuesday 19th May 2015

IAN SINCLAIR recommends We Are Many, Amir Amiani’s documentary on the many millions who demonstrated worldwide against the Iraq war in 2003

We Are Many
Directed by Amir Amirani
4/5

FEBRUARY 15 2003 “was the single largest mobilisation of people in the history of humanity — bar none,” notes US analyst Phyllis Bennis in We Are Many, Amir Amirani’s brilliant new documentary about the global anti-war movement against the Iraq war.

Beginning with the terrorist attacks on 9/11, Amirani uses stirring archive news footage and original interviews with key figures like Tony Benn, Clare Short, Jesse Jackson and Noam Chomsky to tell the story of that momentous day.

Around 30 million people marched in 789 major cities in over 72 countries across the world. A small rally even took place at the McMurdo research station in Antarctica. Over 1,000,000 people marched through London in the biggest protest in British history.

The story will be familiar to many Morning Star readers but the film does include many important and interesting snippets of information and analysis, such as US air force veteran Tim Goodrich blowing apart the fiction that war was a last resort. The US bombing of Iraq increased by over 500 per cent in autumn 2002 “with the purpose of trying to goad Saddam Hussein into retaliating to give us a reason to go to war,” he says.

Elsewhere Hans Blix, the chief UN weapons inspector from 2000 until 2003, amusingly explains that the US and UK “were 100 per cent sure that there were weapons of mass destruction” in Iraq though “they had zero per cent knowledge of where they were.”

And who knew that Virgin boss Richard Branson had made an unsuccessful attempt to stop the war by flying Nelson Mandela to Baghdad on the eve of the invasion?

The film ends by exploring the long-lasting impact of February 15 2003, including its role in shifting British public opinion so much that it made it impossible for the coalition government to go to war against Syria a decade later.

Amirani also tells the unknown story of how the global movement against the Iraq war inspired Egyptians to start protesting against President Hosni Mubarak. “That’s exactly when I was thinking, and others, that if we were triple that number, or four times that number, we could take down Mubarak,” notes one Egyptian activist about the March 2003 protest in Tahrir Square against the war.

Writing in the New York Times, journalist Patrick Tyler commented that the global demonstrations were “reminders that there may still be two superpowers on the planet: the United States and world public opinion.”

Taking its name from the last line of Shelley’s 1819 poem Mask of Anarchy, We Are Many is itself a moving and timely reminder of the power of activism and protest — the perfect antidote to the despair created by the new Tory majority government.

Ian Sinclair’s book The March That Shook Blair: An Oral History of 15 February 2003 is available from the Morning Star shop for £10 + £2.50P&P.

Far from facing the truth, the US is telling new lies about Iraq: Gary Younge. Politicians who claim they had no choice but to support the invasion are wrong. America got a war it wanted – even if it wasn’t what it expected: here.

In 2003 UN imposed sanctions against Iraq – instigated by US and Britain – as a result of which 500,000 children died. IAN SINCLAIR has the story: here.

New film about wildlife in Amsterdam, the Netherlands


This video, with subtitles in English and German, is about a mute swan family in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

According to Dutch daily Het Parool today, the makers of succesful film De Nieuwe Wildernis (The New Wilderness), about Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve, have plans for a new film.

It will be called De Wilde Stad (The Wild City). Its subject is wildlife in Amsterdam, capital city in the Netherlands.

The intention is to have five animals as main characters. It is not yet sure which five species they will be. Provisionally, the filmmakers think about a coot, a grey heron, a brown rat, and a red fox.

Filming will start next month. The plans are for the movie to be in the cinemas before the end of 1916.

New film about anti-Iraq war peace movement


This video from Britain says about itself:

WE ARE MANY – OFFICIAL TRAILER – MAY 21 NATIONWIDE SCREENINGS WITH Q&A, IN CINEMAS MAY 22

24 April 2015

To find out where the film is playing visit: www.wearemany.com/cinemas.

We Are Many tells for the first time the remarkable story of the biggest protest in history, and how it changed the world.

Eight years in the making, filmed in seven countries, and including interviews with John Le Carré, Damon Albarn, Brian Eno, Danny Glover, Mark Rylance, Richard Branson, Hans Blix and Ken Loach amongst others, it charts the birth and rise of the people power movements that are now sweeping the world, all through the prism of one extraordinary day.

On February 15th 2003, over 15 million people marched through the streets of 800 cities on every continent to voice their opposition to the proposed war in Iraq. This unprecedented global march was organised, against all odds, by a patchwork of peace campaigners in many countries, who reveal how they pulled off the historic demonstration, and whose legacy is only now unfolding.

On May 21 we will hold an exclusive live by satellite event (broadcast from Curzon Mayfair, London), after the film there will be a post screening discussion.

Journalist and broadcaster Jon Snow will host the discussion with guests including the film’s director Amir Amirani, executive producer and comedian Omid Djalili, convenor of the Stop The War Coalition Lindsey German and professor of international law at UCL Philippe Sands.

For more information about the film please visit:

www.wearemany.com
www.facebook.com/WeAreManyMovie
www.twitter.com/WeAreManyMovie

From daily The Guardian in Britain today:

We Are Many: the legacy of the global anti-war protests in 2003 – video trailer world exclusive

We Are Many, directed by Amir Amirani, explores the legacy of the global anti-war demonstrations of 15 February 2003, an event that saw an estimated million people march against the Iraq war in London alone.

Filmed over nine years, the film talks to key campaigners, including Damon Albarn, Ken Loach and the late Tony Benn, as well as those who made the decision to go to war. A special satellite screening of the film with a Q+A with Jon Snow takes place in London on 21 May, transmitted to select cinemas across the country, while the film is released on 22 May.

See it first on May 17th as part of Guardian Live at the Rio Cinema.