Black vultures, mates for life


This 30 November 2018 video from Florida in the USA says about itself:

Black Vulture couple spends some quality time behind the Backyard. You can tell by the twinkle in their eyes they are deeply in love. They are monogamous and mate for life but don’t build traditional nests in trees. Another lovely couple is here:

To to see a pair actually mating (Rated R) check out here:

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Young California condor fledges, videos


This video from California in the USA says about itself:

California Condor Family Spreads Their Wings In The Sun – Oct. 14, 2018

The family that suns together stays together! Watch the California Condors spread their wings in succession after the sun peeked through the clouds in Hutton’s Bowl. Sunbathing may serve primarily to dry feathers prior to flight, but researchers suggest it may also aid in thermoregulation and reduction of feather deformations.

The California Condor cam is a collaboration between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Santa Barbara Zoo, the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Watch Live 24/7, with highlights and news updates, at http://allaboutbirds.org/condors

This video says about itself:

All Three Condors Take Off In Succession in Hutton’s Bowl – Oct. 14, 2018

Enjoy this family moment from the California Condor cam when the condors take off over the canyon one after another in Hutton’s Bowl. Fledgling #923 follows his parents’ lead with a steady flight after mom (wearing yellow tag #289) and dad (wearing blue tag #374) flap their enormous wings and fly out of view of the camera.

Young California condor’s first short flight


This video from California in the USA says about itself:

Hutton’s Bowl Condor Chick Makes Jump-Flight While Exploring Canyon – Sept. 24, 2018

California Condor chick #923 is growing up in front of our eyes. Over the last few weeks, the cross-canyon cam has captured the young condor exploring the farther reaches of the cliff side near the Hutton’s Bowl nest. As the chick continues to progress towards fledging, we’ll see it perform increasing amounts of wing exercise that sometimes lofts it into the air for short distances, like this jumping flight across a cliff side gap this morning. These short burst of wing activity will aid the chick as it navigates the canyon side near the nest, but they are not considered a fledge event.

Condor experts have defined fledging as the first flight that takes a nestling beyond a walking commute to the nest entrance and necessitates an aerial return to the nest entrance.

The California Condor cam is a collaboration between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Santa Barbara Zoo, the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. This view of the Hutton’s Bowl California Condor Nest is a new view set up from across the canyon, giving a view of the nesting area as well as the surrounding cliff faces that the chick #923 has been traversing. If the chick’s not visible on this cam, be sure to check on the nest cam itself, here.

Zoo-born vultures doing well in wild Sardinia


This 10 January 2018 video from Artis zoo in Amsterdam in the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

Today two young griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) are going from ARTIS to Sardinia to be released in the wild later this year. The birds hatched in April and May last year in ARTIS. One young bird was cared for by a same-sex male griffon vulture couple. The other vulture is the offspring of two vultures which had been injured in the wild in Spain and – after having partially recovered – were admitted to ARTIS.

Things are going well for these two young vultures, freed on 14 April 2018, Artis reports:

The vultures initially stayed in the vicinity of the protected area in the Parco Regionale di Porto Conte, where they were fed carcasses. The young vultures from ARTIS stayed in the vicinity of the location where they were freed for the first ten days. Around 24 April they both flew to the south and joined a colony of about 140-160 griffon vultures there.

The ARTIS vultures mix well with the other griffon vultures. They fly along with the colony, and are usually seen together at the feeding place. One of the two birds, the female, is very dominant and actively defends her place near a carcass, or at a shadowy spot under a tree.

Rare bearded vulture in Dutch Zeeland


This weekend, this bearded vulture was seen flying over Dishoek and Oostkapelle towns in Zeeland province in the Netherlands. It probably still is around there.

It is estimated the bird is about two years old. It has no ring, meaning it is a wild bearded vulture.

See also here.

Griffon vultures depend on sun to fly


This video says about itself:

Griffon Vultures Depend on the Sun to Fly. Why?

The Griffon vulture is one of the largest vulture species. Because of its giant stature, it uses an immense amount of energy to take off. Luckily, these birds have found a way to use the rising currents of hot air to their advantage. From: DAVID ATTENBOROUGH‘S CONQUEST OF THE SKIES: Triumph.