Norwegian politician’s sympathy for school murder Swedish nazi

This video says about itself:

Swedish school murderer Anton Lundin Pettersson

23 October 2015

He was dressed like Darth Vader as he killed a teacher and a student with a sword at a school in Trollhättan, Sweden. The horrifying attack happened at a high school in the city on the morning of October 22. The suspect has been named as Anton Lundin Pettersson, 21. Cops were called to the scene at 10:10 a.m. local time on October 22. In total, three people are dead, including Pettersson. Reports from Sweden indicate that two others are in stable but serious condition.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Students Posed for Photos With Pettersson Thinking He Was Dressed for Halloween

Anton Lundin-Pettersson Facebook page

The BBC reports that the suspect is not known to local police in Trollhättan. The network says that he killed a student and a teacher at the school with a sword, while injuring another teacher and student. There was so much confusion during the attack that pupils at the Kronan School posed for photos with Pettersson, thinking it was all part of a Halloween joke.

He was shot and killed by responding police officers to the school. Pettersson was a resident of Trollhättan, according to his Facebook page. The two dead people were found at the entrance to the school. A police spokesperson said that more than one knife was used in the attack. He acted alone, reports Russia Today.

Trollhattan Sword Attack Darth Vader Suspect Hitler Neo Nazi You Tube
Police work at the scene of the school. (Getty)

Speaking to the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet, a student at the school, using the pseudonym Sara, described that Pettersson was blaring “horrible, Halloween-type” music. When students left their classrooms they saw Pettersson, thinking it was a prank, the students went to take photos with him. After a teacher tried to move him along, Sara says Pettersson stabbed that man. Sara and her friends ran and although he chased them, they managed to escape.

Anton Lundin Pettersson: Photos of Trollhattan Killer

A man in a Darth Vader mask killed two people at a Swedish school. His YouTube page shows his sympathies for Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany.
Click here to read more

2. His YouTube Channel Shows His Admiration for Hitler & Nazi Germany

Trollhattan Sword Attack Darth Vader Suspect Hitler Neo Nazi You Tube
Police have cordoned off the scene at the school. (Getty)

A police spokesman, Thord Haraldsson said that Pettersson’s home has been searched by investigators and that officers found “interesting things,” according to the BBC report. Haraldsson didn’t comment about Pettersson’s links to Nazi extremism. Though Pettersson’s YouTube page shows an admiration for Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. The Local in Sweden reports that he was also critical of Islam and immigration. The Swedish newspaper Expressen reports that Pettersson was a subscriber to leading right-wing bloggers in the country.

The attack comes as the Swedish government confirmed that in 2015, the country will take in up to 190,000 asylum seekers, stemming from the refugee crisis in Syria.

From The Local in Norway:

Norway politician resigns after sword killer post

Published: 26 Oct 2015 10:15 GMT+01:00

A politician for Norway’s populist right-wing Progress Party

the party of which racist mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik used to be a member

has been forced to resign after posting on Facebook that he could ‘almost understand’ the 21-year-old Swede who unleashed a brutal sword attack at a school on Thursday.

Claus Forberg, 76, who serves in the city council in Kragerø, southern Norway, resigned from the party on Monday.

Forsberg on Friday wrote on a closed Facebook page that he “could almost understand that Swedish fool who ran amok at school with a sword.” He added that he had only called the Swedish killer “a fool” because he had worn a mask.

The apparent approval of the attack by 21-year-old Swede Anton Lundin-Pettersson, which left a 21-year-old teaching assistant and a 15-year-old student dead, was immediately condemned by his own party.

Lundin-Pettersson, a computer gamer who dressed only in black or camouflaged clothes, died on Thursday after being shot by police at the end of his attack. According to Swedish police, he selected his victims by skin colour.

Norway’s Prime Minister Erna Solberg also said it was “totally unacceptable” for politicians to give any support to violence.

“It is legitimate to discuss politics and express the worries many have, but it is not legitimate to incite violence or give support to violence,” she said.

But Forberg was initially unapologetic, arguing that the failure of governments in Sweden and Norway to control immigration from Muslim countries was forcing people into drastic acts.

He blamed “the politics that are conducted in Norway in Sweden,” where “people give in to Muslims” for the attack.

“The Muslims are in the process of changing Norwegian society,” he wrote.

He told Norway’s ABC news that he himself thought of carrying out similar attacks.

“I can also fantasise about taking the lives of some Arabs,” he said.

Only later, when he realised the extent of the opposition his remarks had triggered, did he admit any fault.

Forberg made his remarks on the “Stop the extreme mass immigration” Facebook group, which is only visible to members.

Swedish police on Friday confirmed that Anton Lundin-Pettersson’s attack was a “hate crime” with victims selected on the basis of their skin colour.

As well as killing two, the 21-year-old wounded three others before he was shot by Swedish police.

Norwegian hiker discovers ancient Viking sword

Press conference on the discovery of the Viking sword, photo by Bjarte Brask Eriksen

From The Local in Norway:

Hiker finds 1,200-yr-old Viking sword in Norway

Published: 21 Oct 2015 07:35 GMT+02:00

A hiker travelling the ancient route between western and eastern Norway found a 1,200-year-old Viking sword after sitting down to rest after a short fishing trip.

The sword, found at Haukeli in central southern Norway will be sent for conservation at the University Museum of Bergen.

Jostein Aksdal, an archeologist with Hordaland County said the sword was in such good condition that if it was given a new grip and a polish, it could be used today.

“The sword was found in very good condition. It is very special to get into a sword that is merely lacking its grip,” he said.

“When the snow has gone in spring, we will check the place where the sword was found. If we find several objects, or a tomb, perhaps we can find the story behind the sword,” he said.

He said that judging by the sword’s 77cm length, it appeared to come from 750-800AD.

“This was a common sword in Western Norway. But it was a costly weapon, and the owner must have used it to show power,” he said.

Rare black-throated thrush on Texel island

This 2013 video is about a black-throated thrush in Norway.

Today, Dutch birder Ruud van Beusekom saw a young female black-throated thrush.

This Asian species is rare in western Europe.

The bird is near Loodsmansduin camping ground near Den Hoorn village on Texel island.

Humpback whales and northern lights video

This video says about itself:

7 October 2015

A group of humpback whales basking under the Northern Lights has been captured on camera by Norwegian TV. The video was filmed off the coast of Kvaløya (Whale Island) near the city of Tromsø.

Humpback whales in the Netherlands: here.

After Breivik’s massacre, back to Utøya in Norway

This video from the USA says about itself:

Norway Terrorism: Its time to talk about real Western Christian Nazi Terrorism | Oslo Utøya 22/7/11

From Associated Press:

Norway’s Utoya youth camp to reopen, four years after mass shooting

Island was site of nation’s worst massacre, when Anders Behring Breivik killed 69 during 2011 rampage

August 6, 2015 10:27AM ET

Four years ago a far-right fanatic gunned down 69 people, shattering tranquillity on the idyllic Norwegian island of Utoya after killing eight in a bomb blast in the center of the capital, Oslo.

This week a flood of newcomers will be arriving on the island as the Labor Party’s youth camp opens for the first time since the massacre, on July 22, 2011.

Emilie Bersaas, a camp organizer, said they won’t allow “that dark day [to] overshadow the nice and bright” memories of past camps or future weekend youth meetings and social events organized by the party’s youth wing, which owns the island, about 25 miles from Oslo.

More than 1,000 students have enrolled for three days of seminars on politics that start Friday. …

Many of the island’s traditional red-and-white wooden buildings have been renovated, and construction continued feverishly Wednesday to complete new conference and meeting rooms. A bright circular steel memorial engraved with the victims’ names has been given pride of place among pine trees on a secluded spot overlooking Tyrifjorden, the surrounding lake.

Mani Hussaini, the president of the youth group, believes that a good balance was found in constructing buildings and restoring old ones, describing the reopening as “an important step” for going forward after the events of 2011.

Utoya will “always [be] a place where we honor and remember our comrades, a place to learn and a place for political engagement,” he told reporters.

The murderous rampage of the self-styled “militant nationalist” Anders Behring Breivik, who randomly shot students as he walked through the island, shocked Norway, a nation of 5 million people in the far north of Europe. About 1 in 4 people in the country were affected by the massacre, through family, friendships or work connections.

It left lasting traces on Utoya, including the dark green cafeteria, which bears bullet marks from the murder of 13 people. It has not been renovated and will open as a center for learning after another building has been built around it.

Survivor Ragnhild Kaski, secretary-general of the youth organization, remembered with glee and excitement how she gave her first political speech in that fateful cafeteria — tinged with deep sorrow and emptiness over the loss of her friends.

“For me, that building will always be the building where I was giving a speech for the very first time, when I was 17 … At the same time, that’s the place where people lost their lives and I was saving mine,” she said. “So it kind of shows it’s part of the island. You have both the good and the bad memories.”

In 2012, Breivik was convicted of mass murder and terrorism and was given a 21-year prison sentence that can be extended for as long as he is deemed dangerous to society — which legal experts say likely means he will be locked up for life.

But his attack on the government quarter in the capital and the students of a left-wing movement in Norway that prides itself on equality and democracy has left a scar on its reputation as a country that doesn’t need armed police and where political leaders can walk freely.

Since the shooting, 16 regional support groups and a national organization were set up to help families of the victims.

On Utoya, the victims’ names, engraved in longhand on the suspended memorial, glittered in the cloudy sky. The youngest was that of a 14-year-old boy; the oldest, that of Breivik’s first target on the island, a 45-year-old security guard.

But not all 69 names are there. Eight spaces have been left for those names parents do not want displayed.

“It’s still too early for some now, and that’s a natural thing, I think,” said Lisbeth Roynehold, whose 18-year-old daughter, Synne, was killed. “Because we grieve in different ways and some parents need more time.”

Roynehold, who is the leader of a July 22 support group, welcomes the reopening of the camp.

“By going back to the island, I think the youngsters will fight for what my daughter fought for,” she said quietly, her folded hands twitching. “They are fighting for democracy.”

‘We are taking the island back’: Norway’s long road back to Utøya. Four years after Anders Behring Breivik murdered 69 people on the island of Utøya, the political youth group he attacked has returned for its annual summer camp for the first time. Will their defiance in the face of such horror bolster the country’s uneasy healing process? Here.