Bat tower in the Netherlands not torn down


Bat tower in Klarenbeek, the Netherlands

Today, regional broadcaster Omroep Gelderland reports about a tower in Klarenbeek village. Marten Brascamp built this tower in his garden in 2011, with permission of local authorities.

However, when it turned out the tower was for housing bats, authorities rescinded the permit, and ordered that the tower should be torn down.

A judge ruled in favour of Marten Brascamp.

Today, the Council of State affirmed that decision.

Good news for the many brown long-eared bats living in the tower.

This is a brown long-eared bat video from Sweden.

Texel island bats research


This is a serotine bat video.

On 9 August 2015, Ecomare museum on Texel in the Netherlands reported on bat research on the island.

Only one species, as far as they know, has colonies on Texel: the serotine bat. Serotine bats have been seen on all Dutch Wadden Sea islands; but only on Texel breeding colonies are known.

107 bats were counted during the 2015 Texel count; less than in other years.

Celebrate International Bat Night in English church, 28 August


This 29 September video from the USA says about itself:

Bats: Guardians of the Night

Visit Bat Conservation International to learn more about these amazing species and what we can do to protect them.

From Wildlife Extra:

Unique opportunity to celebrate International Bat Night

On Friday 28 August, to mark International Bat Night, The Churches Conservation Trust (CCT) is offering wildlife enthusiasts, their families and friends the opportunity to stay overnight in a 13th century church inhabited by a colony of Natterer’s bats.

Guests are invited to sleep in the aisle of the church and sample “champing” (church camping) whilst learning more about the mysterious creatures overhead from bat experts on site.

The event will take place at The Church of St John the Baptist in Parson’s Drove, Cambridgeshire, a stunning Grade II* church which has been in The CCT’s care since 1974 and which is a long-time favourite of both bats and architecture enthusiasts.

An expert bat-handler will lead the evening with a presentation about the fascinating animals and everyone will have a chance to try out the bat detectors.

After sunset, the bats will appear from under the church roof and guests can help The CCT count them as they emerge for their night’s feeding.

The unique break was inspired by The CCT’s hugely successful champing holiday breaks, which give people the chance to stay overnight in some of the UK’s most beautiful churches.

Camp beds will be provided in the aisles of the church so guests can get some rest before rising at 4.30am to enjoy the spectacle of the bats swarming back to the church. A hearty breakfast will be provided at 8.30am.

The bat survey will be crucial in helping ecologists on site understand more about these mysterious creatures. For more information about the event please visit The CCT website here.

This event is suitable for children over eight. Families with younger children are welcome to join in without champing at the evening-only event. Tea, coffee and squash included in the ticket price and all children will receive a free bat toy!

Bat Champing Packages cost from £45 (£25 for under 16s) including breakfast, bat talks, bat detectors and bed in an aisle of a stunning 13th century church

Bat Watching Evening tickets are available for £5 (£2 for children)

New nectar-feeding bat species discovered in Brazil


This video says about itself:

Green Ambassador Brazil Bat Research

11 May 2007

With the University of Campo Grande the Green Ambassadors researched the biodiversity of bats in the Pantanal, Brazil. Where over 700 plant species depend on bats for pollination.

The video is in Portuguese, but its subtitles can be switched to English or other languages.

From Wildlife Extra:

New bat species discovered

A new species of nectar-feeding bat from Brazil has been unexpectedly discovered during a study into the whole genus of Lonchophylla.

The scientists Drs. Ricardo Moratelli and Daniela Dias examined both wild and museum specemins of L. mordax, when they realised, rather than looking at one species they were looking at two different species.

Called L. inexpectata, the new species has considerably paler ventral (abdominal) fur and some of their measurements were inconsistent with L. mordax, including differences in the skull and the teeth morphology.

The scientific description of the new species is here.

Bats hibernating and mating, new study


This video is about bat hibernation in Endless Cave, in Washington County, Indiana, USA.

From PLOS One:

Bats Swarm Where They Hibernate: Compositional Similarity between Autumn Swarming and Winter Hibernation Assemblages at Five Underground Sites

Jaap van Schaik, René Janssen, Thijs Bosch, Anne-Jifke Haarsma, Jasja J. A. Dekker, Bart Kranstauber

Abstract

During autumn in the temperate zone of both the new and old world, bats of many species assemble at underground sites in a behaviour known as swarming. Autumn swarming behaviour is thought to primarily serve as a promiscuous mating system, but may also be related to the localization and assessment of hibernacula. Bats subsequently make use of the same underground sites during winter hibernation, however it is currently unknown if the assemblages that make use of a site are comparable across swarming and hibernation seasons.

Our purpose was to characterize the bat assemblages found at five underground sites during both the swarming and the hibernation season and compare the assemblages found during the two seasons both across sites and within species. We found that the relative abundance of individual species per site, as well as the relative proportion of a species that makes use of each site, were both significantly correlated between the swarming and hibernation seasons. These results suggest that swarming may indeed play a role in the localization of suitable hibernation sites. Additionally, these findings have important conservation implications, as this correlation can be used to improve monitoring of underground sites and predict the importance of certain sites for rare and cryptic bat species.

Bats in Wassenaar World War II bunkers: here. And here.

WWII ALMOST INVOLVED A BAT BOMB “Imagine: a quiet, tense night in the middle of wartime. A plane rips through the air above your city, rupturing the stillness. The bay doors open, and out whistles a bomb. It drops and drops. Everyone braces. But when it explodes, the city is filled not with the flash of impact, but with hundreds and hundreds of tiny, whirling bats. This ridiculous vision — in which Japanese cities were destroyed by a giant bomb full of bats that were themselves carrying tinier bombs — was called Project X-Ray, and it was but a claw’s breadth from becoming a reality.” [Atlas Obscura]

Children’s story about bats


This video is called Fun Facts About Bats.

From the site of NASA in the USA, where the story continues:

THE STORY OF Echo the Bat

In the upper elevations of Arizona, there was a forest of tall Ponderosa pine trees. The forest was covered with snow and the evenings were quiet as animals slept through the cold winter nights. When spring arrived, the snow melted and a colony of female bats made their home in a hollow pine tree to raise their young.

Echo and his mom hang upside down safe in their tree. Echo is under his mom’s wings. There is a crescent moon outside.

Unlike birds who hatch from eggs, bats are mammals. The mother bats will give birth to their young and feed them mother’s milk. Because their pups are too young to fly and catch their food, Mother bats care for their pups during the first month.

As the warm days of spring led to summer, a baby bat was born. He had a tiny, furry body with awkward wings. His mother held him close to her and wrapped him in her wings. All day long, she could hear his chirping cry echo through the hollow tree. From that day on, his mother called him “Echo.”